Could I do this aviation job?

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

choppergirl

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2015
Messages
1,669
Location
Choppergirl's Flying Circus ★★☠★★ AIR-WAR.ORG
I was browsing jobs today, not even aviation jobs, just all jobs, and came across a Naval Aviator job - and I was like, oh to hell with this, basically you have to already be a jet fighter pilot currently to get a jet fighter pilot job. Nowhere to get your foot in the door anywhere; the aviation industry is some kind of bad joke. /end gripe

Then I came across this oddball... you know I click all the oddball jobs.. (right after Chess teacher), and I was like, well, requirements are pretty generic, sounds like if you had a generalist community college education and were responsible, and the type of person that could stay on top of things you could handle it.

BTW, I know where McMurdo Station is at, I watched a Youtube video on it one time, it's at the *** end of the universe in well.. a grey frozen hellscape. I don't even need to look it up to know where it is and all the reasons nobody in their right mind would want to work there - a Snickers Bar would probably cost you $30. But on the other hand, maybe mostly CoronaVirus free?

Job Title: Aviation Operations Coordinator
Assigned Work Site: McMurdo Station, Antarctica
Reports to: Fixed Wing & Helicopter Operations Supervisors
Department: Field
Employment Type: Seasonal Contract Summer
Summary:
ASC’s Science Aviation team manages the scheduling and logistics for NSF’s DOI-contracted aircraft on continent. On the Fixed Wing side, Kenn Borek Air operates a DC-3 Basler and several DHC-6 Twin Otters in the deep field. On the Rotary Wing (Helicopter) side, Air Center Helicopters operates two Astar B3es and two Bell 412s in the near field. Aviation Operations Coordinators support all continental flight activities for helicopter, fixed wing aircraft, and uncrewed aircraft systems. Coordinators are assigned to specific areas of support for the entire season.
The Fixed Wing Operations Coordinator will assist the Aviation Operations Supervisors in the management of aviation resources and in support of active flight operations. Interfaces with flight crews, grantees, National Science Foundation (NSF), field camps, ASC work centers, and any other required agencies to facilitate support requirements for fixed wing flights and uncrewed aircraft systems (UAS) operations. Coordinates cargo and passengers for fixed wing flights. Is responsible for flight data management and reporting. Assists with delivery of the daily flight schedule that is developed based on support requirements and NSF priorities. Assist with tracking of statistical information regarding flight missions, aircraft tasking, cargo and passenger movements, fuel, and geographic coordinates.
The Helicopter Operations Coordinator assists the Helicopter Ops Supervisor in planning and implementing the most efficient use of available rotary wing resources via administrative support of active flight operations from McMurdo’s helicopter hangar. This role interfaces with helicopter contractor flight crews, grantees, NSF managers, field camps, fellow ASC work centers, and other required agencies on station in support of the NSF’s scientific mission at helo-supported camps, directs the movements of constantly changing cargo and passenger loads for helicopter flights in real time, and inputting accurate flight data for all completed missions, as well as tracking it for reporting purposes. Candidates must demonstrate the ability to be autonomous in their role within approx. one month of arrival and be able to remain focused within a busy work environment.
GENERAL DUTIES (not all-inclusive):
Maintains communication with pilots, field parties and/or field camps as required. This responsibility includes relaying updates on weather and other environmental conditions, emergent safety factors, and all changes in support requirements to relevant agencies and participants.
Enters mission data and generates multiple reports in Maximo, Pipeline, Access, Excel, and other programs to facilitate, track, and coordinate all on-continent fixed wing or helicopter missions, cargo movements, and passenger movements for USAP aviation resources.
Facilitates the movement of passengers and cargo on USAP aviation resources by coordinating required support activities between USAP agencies & ASC departments
Utilizes Google Earth and AFF to monitor aircraft movements
Disseminates flight schedule information and updates to USAP community via Public Area Displays, USAP intranet publications, emails, and other methods.
Provides statistical information regarding intra-continental flights including planned vs. actual missions, passenger and cargo movements, causes for flight delays, aborts or cancellations
Maintains fuel cache inventory documentation
Maintains geographic coordinates documentation
Acts as McMurdo-based point of contact for deep field camps and/or collaborates with Cargo Coordinators for building retrograde cargo manifests.
Assists NSF to coordinate support for aircraft, passengers, and cargo from other national Antarctic programs coming to McMurdo Station
  • Assists Supervisor in the execution of allocated flight hours based on NSF priorities by providing input/making decisions as to more efficient ways to conduct flights given current/changing conditions.
  • Contributes to the creation of a daily flight schedule and a weekly flight plan
  • Ensures compliance with applicable Safety, Environmental, Health, and Waste Management policies/procedures and ensures that safety is the highest priority in the workplace
Attends flight-planning meetings with science and operational groups as required as possible.
  • Coordinates wellness checks for mobilizing aircraft crews and other duties related to transiting aircraft
  • Interacts with NSF, their sub-contracting agencies, military personnel and other agency officials in a professional and tactful manner.
  • Acts as a liaison with grantees, NSF, deep field camp supervisors, USAF, NYANG, Kenn Borek Air, ENEA, ASC work centers and any other required entities to facilitate USAP intra-continental aviation support requirements for cargo, passenger and fuel movement
  • Determines the most efficient method to provide support to each of the entities listed above with available USAP fixed wing resources
  • Performs other duties as required.
  • High School diploma or equivalent required. BA/BS degree in a business or an air transportation related field preferred
  • Valid driver’s license is required
  • Experience in aviation logistical support or passenger and cargo movement, to include documentation, expediting, and tracking is strongly preferred
  • Must be willing to work swing shift or evening shift
  • Experience with field work, science support, or remote logistical support is strongly preferred
  • Prior USAP logistical support experience is preferred
  • Experience in administration (including use of email, internet, and Microsoft Office products) required.
  • Must be skilled in word processing, spreadsheets and data base software, and have strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Familiarity with aviation radio communications is preferred
  • Willingness and ability to deploy to Antarctica for extended periods is required.
  • Must be willing and able to lift and move items, parts, assemblies and equipment up to the safety regulation maximum.
  • Must be willing and able to perform physical activities including heavy lifting, climbing in and out of equipment, crawling, and working outdoors.
  • Must successfully complete the physical, dental and psychological (if applicable) examinations as required by the NSF for deploying to Antarctica.
  • Must participate in community programs, such as “house-mouse” (chores in living spaces), “daisy-picking” (cleaning-up around the station), recycling efforts and safety objectives.
  • Must be legally able to work in the United States.
REQUIREMENTS:
We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Job Type: Contract
Salary: $776.95 to $860.00 /hour
Experience:
  • Aviation Logistical Support: 1 year (Preferred)
Education:
  • High school or equivalent (Required)
License:
  • Drivers License (Required)
Work authorization:
  • United States (Required)
Contract Length:
  • 7 - 11 months
Contract Renewal:
  • Possible
Full Time Opportunity:
  • No
Additional Compensation:
  • Bonuses
Work Location:
  • Fully Remote
Benefits:
  • Health insurance
  • Retirement plan
Schedule:
  • Other
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,667
Location
USA.
Big demand for pilots at this time. I was hired on my first flying job a day after getting my rating. Had the hours. That was 35 years ago and its better now. Go for it.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
12,234
Location
Memphis, TN
I think it’s the six months of isolation. Got to get payed to go insane.

On a serious note. Only you chopper, can make the call.
 

TerryM76

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Sep 8, 2012
Messages
557
Location
Tempe, AZ
Getting to work on that fleet would check all the boxes for me.....I've often said that if I had the opportunity to work on those aircraft for one employer I wouldn't want to retire.....that Basler DC-3 would be a nice one to add to the list. Anyway....that job posting sure looks enticing if I was a lot younger.
 

Wanttaja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,387
Location
Seattle, WA
I think it’s the six months of isolation. Got to get payed to go insane.
Actually, only a relatively small staff remains at sites like this during the winter ("Wintering over," it's called) and there are quite a few people there on other times of the year. That's why the contract length is less than a year. Doubt they even fly during the winter, although emergency flights are dispatched from New Zealand in medical emergencies.

A great reference to flying in the Antarctic is Mark Hinebaugh's "Flying Upside Down." He was a Navy pilot flying ski-equipped C-130s in support of Antarctic operations. Fun read.


Ron Wanttaja
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,667
Location
USA.
My son has been about everywhere except the Antarctic. Took new equipment to the Arctic on the ice pack with a C-130 on Skies. Took skids of extra parts for the airplane, stopped on the way and had neoprene rubber sheet put all over the belly of the fuselage to protect for ice getting kicked up. They lost the de-ice on the stab from ice.
6 men stationed for 6 months at a time at the radar station.
Also Gulf War, Somalia in a gunship, Honduras, Africa, etc, etc. Red flag 2 times.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
12,234
Location
Memphis, TN
I had a work colleague who was Navy on the C130s going to Antarctica back in the 80s. It was his favorite posting. He also had a daughter that was on Springer. Met wife in New Zealand during time there. Just a few years ago went back for retirement.
 

choppergirl

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2015
Messages
1,669
Location
Choppergirl's Flying Circus ★★☠★★ AIR-WAR.ORG
The coolest job, or the coldest job? I'm thinking coldest... walk 100 ft out into a whiteout snow storm and never find your way back.


I imagine a lot of your paycheck is eaten up by rent, living expenses, heating, etc.

There are no pilot's jobs. Stop telling people there are. : - ) There are no pilots jobs for people with no pilot's license and not less than like XXXX thousand hours of jet engine flight time. We all know it takes multi-thousands of dollars just to get a pilots license so bump that, you still got the XXXX hours to log before you're employable, so that's out. No fighter pilots job's either. All my grandfather had to do was have a college degree and sign up. You can forget that, nobody will train you for any job anymore, corporations and recruiters all want to cherry pick from people who already have experience, or rob already employed employees from someone else. That don't work anymore where everybody has to switch careers with almost every job change and start all over again at the bottom.

It doesn't just affect high school/college students. When you're industry tanks, and you have to jump ship and start all over in some other career, any other career, you'll find out soon enough, there are no doors anymore.

I thought about that Navy pilot job that offered no training, only hiring already existing fighter pilots, and it occurred to me... the only way you're going to get that person is if you steal from some other branch... because you're not training any new pilots, not creating any more pilots, you're playing a zero sum decreasing game.

Those A&P mechanic guys don't seem too happy, living out of cars, working all night and going to school all day long. I think I'll pass on that just to be a grease monkey in a thankless job the public doesn't even know exists.

The scary thing is a lot of jobs I do see out there that aren't worthless retail jobs (well, those just evaporated!!), are insane stuff you do not want to take. Ever. Tower Climbers. Explosive Ordinance disarmers. Rescue swimmers. Now, probably Pandemic Patient Caretakers and an upswing in Morticians Basically, stuff that will get you killed (or having you deal with dead bodies, ugh) :-/

This one just looked interesting to me because at least it was aviation related... with no previous experience necessary (ok, they were asking for a year but 1 is close enough to 0, right?), so I was like, hey, wait a minute double take.

~

This is really what I want to be doing / building large scale gas powered varirable collective pitch 3D prop quadcopters:


They are not new - 10 or more years old by now - they were the earliest 3D quads - How they work - one govenor speed controlled engine belt/rod/chain driving 4 helicopter tail rotors with slabs for props (vs say 4 independent reversible high kv electric motors). What makes them appealing to me is you could/can use one (or two for redudancy) lightweight high power to weight aircraft gasoline engines with high power to weight gasoline to power all four rotors (vs expensive electric motors & Lipos). Won't find a job building these - anywhere. Even though I think they are going to be one piece of kit of the next hotness when coupled with a cellular link and computer software controlled dispach ground stations.

I've been here 5 years, if I'm a troll, I sure wasted a lot of time that I could of been trolling, posting cool aviation videos I found to autoreply's Big Video Topic long after everyone else quit. Bleah.
 
Last edited:

Wanttaja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,387
Location
Seattle, WA
I imagine a lot of your paycheck is eaten up by rent, living expenses, heating, etc.
I believe living quarters and food are provided. Obviously, they don't want to keep an Albertson's stocked, and they won't want to build excess housing nor install kitchens in each apartment. Better, logistically, to have cafeterias and standardized rooms. None of the land is privately owned, anyway.

Ron Wanttaja
 

cvairwerks

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 12, 2010
Messages
188
Location
North Texas
Have a friend that did two tours at Little America. It’s not for the faint of heart. Lots of isolation, limited access to the outside world and you have to be able to tolerate cramped living with very little personal space and good rapport with coworkers. Due to the logistical costs, they probably won’t take on an untrained new hire for down there. Applying might get you in the door for other operations.
 

narfi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
795
Location
Alaska
Do it!
Can't hurt to try.

23yrs ago I took a summer job in an isolated village in alaska as an adventure to go on before starting school and life.

I'm still on that adventure :)
 

crusty old aviator

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2014
Messages
114
Location
Grantham, NH
Summer down under is winter here, so you’ll be dealing with snow anyway. What you have to possess for this position is a calm temperament, as you’ll be working with many different people, all with their own needs and agendas, and have to weave them all together to limit their expectations so their disappointments are minimized, otherwise they get stressed and then you and everyone else gets stressed and they start questioning to your face why they ever hired you because you’re worthless. This isn‘t a position for dreamers, it’s strictly for doers. There’s no time for what you want because you’re on 24/7 supporting and coordinating everybody and everything down there that needs to be somewhere else. As the posting says: this isn't a full time gig, it’s an ALL the time gig.

Go for the quad copter! Read up on the engineering, design it, scratch build it, text it, tweak it, and when she flies great, debut it. Maybe you’ll find an angel investor to help you put it into production, or sell the rights to it with the proviso that you work in production, and you‘ll be getting paid to build them.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,667
Location
USA.
Today is the best time in history to get a flying job.
I did those dangerous jobs to get ahead, Built smoke stacks to 1268', did the tower climbing, worked setting steel in building high building, etc. Yes, a lot of my buddies got killed. At the time it was more dangerous than being in Viet. Paid good and used the money wisely. Bought an cheap airplane to get my rating and hours.

Retired airline pilot next door came from a very poor family, got a job as a lineboy at the local airport. Lived in a tent in the woods close to the airport for the first summer. Cold weather came and the FBO he worked for let him sleep in the office. Other than food, he spent every penny for flight instruction until he got his instructor rating and the FBO hired him as an instructor. That is the time I met him when he would stop with a student at the airport were I was based. Building time flying any job he could get, hauling checks, hauling freight, then a Corp pilot and then the airlines. Was 18th in seniority when retired. He paid his dues the hard way, but he got to do what he wanted. When he was pumping fuel he told people that he was going to fly for the airlines some day.
You can do it IF you want to bad enough. If not, you will not. Simple as that. Wishing and complaining is a not going to cut it.
 
Last edited:

MadProfessor8138

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
736
Location
Ekron,Kentucky
choppergirl.......I'm not meaning to be the bad guy here but it's going to appear that way because I'm going to say what many people are probably thinking but refrain from actually typing.
It seems that you have no interest in actually building and flying anymore...it happens,priorities and interests change with time,no shame in that.
But you keep posting about jobs that you are not qualified to do and have no intention of putting in the hard work,sacrifices and dedication that it takes to acheive the qualifications for the position.
Why go through the effort of complaining about it ?
Most of us understand that you're not happy for whatever reason....but why the constant need,with every post, to reiterate the fact that aviation has done you wrong and you're unhappy ?

As to your comment about wasted time.....yes,yes you have wasted a considerable amount of your life constantly complaining about things instead of putting in the work required to acheive a goal that would make you happy.
I don't think you're a Troll but I do think you're unhappy and misery loves company so you keep posting in hopes that others will jump on the bandwagon with you.


It seems that you are really into the quadcopters now days.....
If you haven't already,why don't you check out some of the rc & quadcopter forums to see if anyone can help you get into that field ?
The quads are big business right now and finding gainful employment in that field should be relatively easy and you would probably enjoy it.
Make a living and have fun at work....win,win.

As I said,I truly don't mean to be the bad guy but it seems aviation is a burr under your saddle now days......so why keep making yourself miserable ?
Get into the quads and start enjoying life every day.

Kevin
 
Last edited:

don january

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
2,749
Location
Midwest
Tho your alone and on your own you feel like "hey" this is something I can do and it just may be ? But the bottom line is can I leave this all behind ? and to keep with airplanes were do they go ? What ever road you take keep the Forum posted and if possible take one of the birds with you.
 

mcrae0104

Armchair Mafia Conspirator
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
3,141
Location
BDU, BJC
I've been here 5 years, if I'm a troll, I sure wasted a lot of time that I could of been trolling, posting cool aviation videos I found to autoreply's Big Video Topic long after everyone else quit. Bleah.
I always wondered, "What is the sound of a melting snowflake?" Now I know.
 
2
Group Builder
Top