Could a Cozy Float

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Toobuilder

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There used to be an ad in the homebuilt magazines that had a Long Eze floating in water with a guy fishing from it. Can't even remember what product was being advertised.
 

Himat

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Interesting in what way, and for whom? I wouldn't expect much in the way of propeller life, or much in the ability to rotate and be anything other than a fast water taxi.
The lack of ability to rotate for take of can be overcome. Improving the propeller life will probably be more difficult.
 

blane.c

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After looking at it, the biggest hurdle would be useful load. After adding the weight of floats it is just a ride for someone wearing a swimsuit.
 

lr27

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Cozy's need a relatively long runway for a light plane. I think a Cozy seaplane might take all week to take off. 1750 ft at sea level* on a hard runway at gross. JATO!

*sea level density altitude. More on a hot day
 

don january

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If you had floats holding the plane up out of the water The canard sure would be enlarged to compensate for drag and weight.
 

Himat

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First, if I understand canard aerodynamics correct, the higher take off speed and reluctance for a canard airplane to rotate is due to less elevator authority than an orthodox airplane. This lower elevator authority is caused by a design choice to not introduce possible dangerous handling characteristics. Ref. Curtis Ascedender.

Put a Cozy on floats and with the step in the right place and with a correct step – sternpost angle it will fly of like on wheels. At a speed higher than an orthodox plane, but that will be no different than on wheels. Only difference I see is that a canard seaplane may benefit from a step slightly forward of an orthodox seaplane.

The aeromodellers have done canard flying boats, have look at these:

(Ok, the Ocelot benefit from a high power loading, the Pelican even without.)
 

don january

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I think the only thing that would change would be airspeed due to drag and added elevator trim to compensate for pitch
 

lr27

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I think if you used a catapult to launch the Cozy, it could fly with floats. Kind of like the observation planes they used to fly from catapults on battleships, and then pick up off the water with a crane. The climb rate might not be anything to write home about, but over water there aren't many obstacles you have to fly over. ;-p Not really an airplane I'd want, but there's no accounting for taste.
 

Tiger Tim

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Seems to me that you might be better off just making the fuselage into a hull and putting some number of turbofans over the wing. Balance it laterally on the water with Long-EZ-type long range tanks also profiled as little hulls. I’m guessing you’d need a whole lot of lake to get the thing airborne, but with enough effort and money it could probably be done.
 

Mcmark

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A friend of mine Peter VanDine, who has now passed, built and flew the Merganser, a canard seaplane very similar to the Longeze. Center section hull with tip floats and VW powered. Peter’s education was marine architect and had many marine vessels to his design credit, as well as at least 2 airplanes. The second was very close to flying when Peter left us. He had water taxi tested it. I wish I had some pics. I might be able to get a couple from the gent who took over the business.
He destroyed the first and the second went to a museum, but I can’t remember where. I’ll find out.
 

billyvray

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I Googled Peter Van Dine. Interesting fellow. He built a LOT of boats using wood, foam, and glass. He later turned to composite helicopter parts and built the aircraft already mentioned. It sounds like the second aircraft was a better version and would be successful. He also built a carbon fiber body for an MG Airline Coupe - talk about dead sexy. I would love to find out more about him.
 
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