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Pilot-34

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Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
As one of those flying in a coma I can testify it it makes it hard to learn to fly precisely when you are afraid are entering a spin. You avoid even approaches to a stall you don’t really do MCA work and how can you do a Precise landing and when you don’t want to be near a stall until after your on the ground?
The worst thing about this is I’m not a 42 hour private pilot recent graduate, I have hundreds of hours enough that I should probably be working on my ATP. Yet I feel like I’m flying wrapped in a anti sensory blanket.
Now here is the scary part I was a older student at my school with Alaskan flying as a goal and and Alaskan experience, how much less did the typical student 19 year old with a laser focus on the front seat at TWA learn ?
 

BJC

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As one of those flying in a coma I can testify it it makes it hard to learn to fly precisely when you are afraid are entering a spin.
Fear of losing control should not an issue. Good training can fix that. Unfortunately, there aren’t many qualified instructors, especially when you consider the instructor’s ability to teach.


BJC
 

Pilot-34

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Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
I can guarantee you I didn’t get a good training.

But I really feel like the best training I got was when I was working on my private pilot license with an individual and he did not cover spins at all not entries to stalls not start of sensing spins and we did the bare minimum of stall work.

When you are working on your private pilot license or maybe I should say when I was working on my private license with A part 61 situation the FBO/Instructor it’s between a rock and a hard place .Trying to reduce the expenses of learning inherently means reducing flying time to a minimum.
And I think most students think every hour over 40 reflects both on the instructor and the student And may be in a unnecessary feathering of the nest.
Oh I thought the man was crooked at the time because we had a deal I paid upfront X number of dollars for what I thought would be the training to get my pilots license.
What he thought it was is the minimum required number of flying hours to get my license. Of course he saw every hour over 40 as my fault because I was learning in adequately and I saw every hour or 40 at his fault because he was teaching in adequately.
40 years later I look back and realize he was crooked as hell but still wish I had paid for an additional 20 hours or so of training in some things that I don’t know that he knew how to train me in.
Crooked as he was through omission or on purpose the part 141 school was worse
 
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Pops

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To many poor instructors out there. Had a bi-annual with a young newer instructor about 25 years ago. He ask me to do a stall in my straight tail C-172. When it finally broke over he was white knuckled holding on to the hand strap with both hands and shouting " that's enough, that's enough."
Then after straight and level he pulled the power off and ask where was I going to land. I told him, 45 degs over my left shoulder is a nice hay field that looks like it was just cut. He said OK and added the power back in. I told him we haven't made the field yet and I pulled the power back off. He went back to holding on to the hand strap with both hands and started saying "That enough, that's enough". I was over a high ridge and did a slipping hard turn to the left with 40 deg flaps and over the trees at the beginning of the field and flew down the field about 20' high and climbed back up to continue the flight. About 5 years latter, he become a good instructor.
Yes I know the POH says no slips with 40 degs of flaps. But I have got to higher altitude and tried it to see what happens. Nothing much, the elevator gets blanked out on one side and the nose drops a little more with a full rudder slip. You can lower and raise the nose by letting off the rudder and back to full rudder.

I may not had been the best student, but I had the best instructors. All 3 were ex-military instructors and one flew a Pitts in competition. Like getting instructed by BJC. You have been there many, many times and got the tee-shirt.
 
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Bill-Higdon

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To many poor instructors out there. Had a bi-annual with a young newer instructor about 25 years ago. He ask me to do a stall in my straight tail C-172. When it finally broke over he was white knuckled holding on to the hand strap with both hands and shouting " that's enough, that's enough."
Then after straight and level he pulled the power off and ask where was I going to land. I told him, 45 degs over my left shoulder is a nice hay field that looks like it was just cut. He said OK and added the power back in. I told him we haven't made the field yet and I pulled the power back off. He went back to holding on to the hand strap with both hands and started saying "That enough, that's enough". I was over a high ridge and did a slipping hard turn to the left with 40 deg flaps and over the trees at the beginning of the field and flew down the field about 20' high and climbed back up to continue the flight. About 5 years latter, he become a good instructor.
Yes I know the POH says no slips with 40 degs of flaps. But I have got to higher altitude and tried it to see what happens. Nothing much, the elevator gets blanked out on one side and the nose drops a little more with a full rudder slip. You can lower and raise the nose by letting off the rudder and back to full rudder.

I may not had been the best student, but I had the best instructors. All 3 were ex-military instructors and one flew a Pitts in competition. Like getting instructed by BJC. You have been there many, many times and got the tee-shirt.
Pops, I had a flight instructor show me the full flaps side slip in a Straight tail 172, he was about my age ( mid 20's we went to school together) his comment something to remember when you need it. You loose altitude fast
 

Pops

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Pops, I had a flight instructor show me the full flaps side slip in a Straight tail 172, he was about my age ( mid 20's we went to school together) his comment something to remember when you need it. You loose altitude fast
Sure do. Then just let off the rudder and roundout and flair. Elevator approach.
 

Marc W

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I scared myself right after I soloed. I was practicing stalls and lost control in a departure stall. The 172 rolled left when it broke and I put in right aileron to level the wings. That just made it roll faster. It went inverted and fell into a spin entry. I didn't know what to do but the 172 just fell into a spiral dive and I was able to recover. I flew for a few years until family obligations made it impossible. I had about a 28 year layoff from flying.

That incident never left me so when I started flying again I got some spin training. Best thing I ever did for my piece of mind while flying! Any aerobatic instructor can give spin training. Do it!
 
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