Converting a Wood Bandsaw

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by Jman, Jan 4, 2006.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Jan 28, 2006 #21

    gsmithengr

    gsmithengr

    gsmithengr

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    slowing a bandsaw

    Neither rheostats nor SCR/TRIAC based light dimmers will slow most motors until you've really reduced the amount of power out. DC motors can be slowed with the above.
     
  2. Jan 17, 2007 #22

    base363

    base363

    base363

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    2
    I looked at this pretty close when setting-up my shop. I built a decision matrix program, and after running all the possiblities, bought a Harbor Freight metal cutting band saw for $169 and a benchtop wood cutting saw from Sears for $119. This combination has worked Great!

    http://www.jumprunenterprises.com
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Jan 22, 2007 #23

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Jarrell, TX. Fly out of Taylor-T74
    Do you have a buy-link for the harbor freight band saw?
     
  4. Jan 22, 2007 #24

    base363

    base363

    base363

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    2
    Here you go!

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=93762

    This looks like the same saw. You will need to replace the blade with one of better quality, so plan on that. The blade that comes with the saw will probably be toothless after about 10 minutes. I also lube the outboard side of the blade with cutting fluid that I drip on a small brush, and make sure to let the saw cut without forcing the material through. Don't lube the side of the blade that comes in contact with the wheels. Most machine shops sell blade lube as well. It usually comes in a tube like grease, but you could buy several brand new blades for the price, so I have never used it?

    http://www.jumprunenterprises.com
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2007
  5. Jan 22, 2007 #25

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

    jgnunn

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Jarrell, TX. Fly out of Taylor-T74
    cheers!
     
  6. Jan 23, 2007 #26

    Peter V

    Peter V

    Peter V

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2006
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'll second that! Getting someone else to do it is far cheaper than doing it yourself (if you don't already have the gear) and the quality of the cut is unbeatable.

    ...but then... we don't call them homebuilt for nothing... and if you finish your aircraft too quickly, the missus will have you working on some new ensuite or patio deck before you can blink :para: :ponder: :para:
     
  7. Jan 23, 2007 #27

    Craig

    Craig

    Craig

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2003
    Messages:
    543
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jupiter, Florida
    Beej, Harbor Freight does have some 24-tooth blades available which work quite well. IIRC, they are 65.5" long, and cost about $10/ea.

    The saw is 3-speed - I only use it on the slowest unless I am cutting Aluminum, in which case I use the fastest speed.

    Nice machine - cuts all those tubes nice and square, as well as the myriad of flat stock for making fittings.

    Biplanes rule!
     
  8. Jan 23, 2007 #28

    Papakeith

    Papakeith

    Papakeith

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    KPVD, Rhode Island USA
    I've actually heard of people using tread mill motors(with the speed controls) and mounting them to their bandsaws. This gives them infinite control of blade speeds.
     
  9. Jan 23, 2007 #29

    wally

    wally

    wally

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Messages:
    926
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    southwest TN.
    Aw, man! Didn't think of that!

    My son brought an old one home he had found by the curb. he tried to fix the belt and gave up. I played with the variable speed motor and controller some and and then couldn't think of a use or space to keep it and tossed it! I did use some of the steel frame for something.
    Oh well, I may find another some day.
    Wally
     
  10. Jan 28, 2007 #30

    RonL

    RonL

    RonL

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Texas
  11. Jan 28, 2007 #31

    RonL

    RonL

    RonL

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Texas
    An additional thought!

    After making the above post, there are some thoughts that might be worth passing along for consideration, by anyone thinking of a conversion like this.

    1. At the lower speeds, the speed controller is delevering lower voltage, thus your power is reduced to, the product of, volts * amps.
    With very little force these motors will exceed their rated amp draw of 18.5, when they are turning at low speeds.

    2. The speed controllers listed by surplus center, are new, and good, units.
    The one for $29.95 has a 8 amp max. And the one for $62.95 has a 10 amp max.
    If you exceed the rated amps of either controller, they will toast very quickly.

    The sum of all this is, you need to keep rpm's high, so you still need pulley, belt, configurations that can be changed.
    And in these different belt configurations, you still have some adjustment values with the controllers.

    So for any tool that requires input of force, by hand , it will be easy to overload the controller.
    I hope this is simple, and easy to understand, for anyone considering this change over.
    Anyone, please feel free to add to, or correct, anything above, if it is wrong or not quite clear.

    Thanks RonL
     
  12. Jan 29, 2007 #32

    Jman

    Jman

    Jman

    Site Developer

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2002
    Messages:
    1,881
    Likes Received:
    53
    Location:
    Pacific NW, USA!
    WOW. Cool site! Thanks for the link!
     
  13. Jan 29, 2007 #33

    RonL

    RonL

    RonL

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    456
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Texas
    Hi Jake

    After more than a dozen orders, i have had no problems in any way.
    However when you consider freight charges, you need to pay close attention to local prices. also watch things like flange bearings, one example is a 1-3/16" bearing, has a price of around $14.00, if you find in conveyor items, a unit with a shaft about 11" long with two flange bearings and a neopreme roller, as a complete unit for around $14.95.

    Anyhow i have found some really sweet deals on their site.

    RonL

    after making the post, i checked the example above, and it seems the roller item is apparently sold out.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2007
  14. Feb 11, 2007 #34

    BabyGreatLakes

    BabyGreatLakes

    BabyGreatLakes

    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    There is a series of variable speed pullies available on the market. they are a pair of dished plates on the shaft held at the largest diameter by a spring. Place the motor on a movable table to allow it be adjusted infanately or place it on a movable stage and move it to predetermined steps. The two halves of the pully separate due to the changes of tension and alter the ratio between the motor drive sides of the belt and the blade drive wheel. the other alternative would be to just obtain some alternate pullies to again change the drive ratio to fixed values.

    Lubricate the blade using cutting oil, WD-40 isn't a very good cutting coolant, is expensive, and is quiet volitile. Mount a container on the upper blade housing and run a small tube and a valve like a brass aquarium air valve in the line to control the drip level and deliver the fluid to the top blade roller/guide block. This will provide a controlable flow of cutting fluid to the work with out flooding the area. Works on jig saws too.
     
  15. Feb 11, 2007 #35

    AlRice

    AlRice

    AlRice

    Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Boca Raton, Fla
    Before you spend a lot of money converting a wood bandsaw, check out Harbor Freight. I bought their $149 metal cutting bandsaw and cut all my steel fittings on it. Works great.
     
  16. Feb 16, 2007 #36

    org

    org

    org

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Castle Rock, CO
    I've cut lots of 4130 plate up to .120 with a table saw and abrasive wheel. It's dirty, and I wouldn't do it with a saw I planned on keeping forever, but it works very well. Be sure to use safety goggles and the blade guard. You can't cut curves, but it works well to get close to the shape you want, then you can grind into the final shape. Straight cuts come out very well. Obviously you can also cut tubing and aluminum as well.

    Olen
     
  17. Jul 15, 2007 #37

    colt45

    colt45

    colt45

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you need variable speed, the best way is to change the 1phase motor out to a 3phase motor. After that is done, then you will need a Variable frequency drive to control it. I would look for those items used on ebay. But if you wanted to buy new, it will set you back about 250.00 to 300.00.
    This set up will keep the torque of the motor were it needs to be so it doesnt stall while putting a load on it.

    All this will run on a standard 1phase line.

    Grizzly has done this with there new model g0621
     
  18. Jul 16, 2007 #38

    Midniteoyl

    Midniteoyl

    Midniteoyl

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2003
    Messages:
    2,406
    Likes Received:
    500
    Location:
    Indiana
    WD-40 sprayed through a brush-type motor, say an old Shop-Vac, equals instant flame-throwing turbine... very fun :)
     
  19. Jul 18, 2007 #39

    Dana

    Dana

    Dana

    Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    8,546
    Likes Received:
    2,962
    Location:
    CT, USA
    When building my ParaFan powered paraglider I used my radial arm saw ('cuz that's what I have). Abrasive wheel for the few steel parts I needed (messy as Olen points out) and special alum/plastic saw blade (with stick wax) for aluminum plate and tubing, and some plastic parts.

    -Dana

    If the government doesn't trust us with our guns, why should we trust them with theirs?
     

Share This Page

arrow_white