Continental Engines

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Craig

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Jan 30, 2003
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Jupiter, Florida
Does anyone have good information on Continental engines? I can de-code the Lycomings without too much problem, like an O-320-A has 150 HP, the -B, -C, -D engines 160 HP, etc. And someplace I have a table of installed weights.

But - for Continental engines, I have almost nothing. The O-300 early models were 145 HP, and they are 6-cyl., but other than that I have almost nothing - no weights, mounting data, nuttin'!

If anyone can point me in the right direction, I'd appreciate it!
 

Craig

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Thanks

Thanks, Orion. I was going to ask via PM, but thought the rest of the world might be curious also.
 

wally

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southwest TN.
What little I know: The early Continental 4 cylinder engines are known by their horsepower. 65, 75 and 85. The O-200A is Opposed, 200 cubic inches and makes 100 hp on a good day. All the Cessna 150s had one.

The O-200 is about 200 lbs dry. Not sure about the O-300 weight. the O-300 uses the same cylinders as the O-200. Lots of them on early Cessna 172s until they started installing the 150 hp Lycomings. The O-300 is getting quite expensive to overhaul. The geared version even more so.

The geared GO-300 is used on the Cessna 175. Don't remember the hp but quite a bit more than the un-geared version. It did run at pretty high rpm to make the hp.

The Reno F-1 racers use a early 65or 75 case because it does not have accessory pads for starter/alternator (lighter) and stock O-200 cam and cylinders. They use a skinny prop and turrn them up to 4000 rpm all the time. they seem to hold together just fine too.

The O-200C has double thrust faces so it can also be used as a pusher - for Veri-ezees mostly. I think that is just a minor difference in the crankshaft - not sure.

J-3 Cubs had the 65 or 75 I think. I seem to remember the 65-75-85 are all the same 145 cubic inches. And the hp difference is different cam(?), carb jetting and redline rpm. Any of them are good dependable motors and readily available. The O-300 is really smooth but heavy and a little short on hp.

Most people say if you run them hard and often, you can get to TBO without problems. If it sits and doesn't run much, cylinders usually make it about 600 hrs.

Oh, yeah, they usually leak oil from the pushrod tube ends.
What little I (think) I know.

Oh one more important thing: They all are ice makers! The intake tubes are in the open below the engine as is the carb. Always assume the first hint of roughness or reduction in rpm is carb ice and apply FULL carb heat, maybe several minutes to clear it.
The Lycoming engines have the intake tubes pass through the crankcase heated by engine oil as well as having the carb bolted to the bottom of it so not nearly as much problem with ice.

Another edit to add this info
www.tcmlink.com/EngSpecSheetDocs/O200B.pdf

Wally
 
Last edited:

Craig

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Jupiter, Florida
Ice

Wally, I've already had my experience with ice on an O-200, about 30 years ago Christmas day. Once was enough.

I am building an Acrosport, which uses power between 100 and 200 HP - quite a range.

So I am checking weights, HP, availability on many engines; I just couldn't find much on the Conts. I finally found what I ws after, BTW.

May put the Acrosport on hold for a while - a pilot friend wants me to build a Fisher Celebrity bipe for him. Should give me enough $$$ to buy my dream engine - the Rotec R-3600.

Thanks to all for your help.
 

robert.lees

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May 21, 2003
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Leicester, UK (EGBG)
Just a little more info on Continentals.

The little ones (say up to O-300) have the camshafts at the bottom of the engine. (not sure where the larger continentals have theirs). However, this means that the camshaft gets lots of "dripping oil" as the engine cools down & sits in the hangar, whereas the Lycomings, with a top camshaft, get very little.

This means that the Continental camshaft is slightly more forgiving, corrosion-wise, of sitting idle.

One of our club fleet with a Lycoming IO-540-C4D5D had less than 500 hours (over about 7 years) when metal was found. The camshaft had spalled to the point of being scrap.

So if operating a Lycoming, use multigrade oil (after the run-in period, of course) to give greater protection to the camshaft. Same applies to Continentals, of course.

One last point on Continentals before I get banned for completely throwing the thread off track, a version of the Continental break-in procedure can be found here (285kb pdf).
 

wally

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southwest TN.
Re: Ice

Originally posted by Craig
May put the Acrosport on hold for a while - a pilot friend wants me to build a Fisher Celebrity bipe for him. Should give me enough $$$ to buy my dream engine - the Rotec R-3600

Don't take this wrong but I 'think' you meant to say, YOU are going to build a Fisher Bipe and then probably sell it.
The FEDs have been taking a dim view of "hired guns" lately - it seems more and more of that is happening, especially with the Van's RV planes.
Wally
 

orion

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Interesting note there Robert - my airplane (Cherokee Pathfinder) with an O-540 (235 hp) just went in for annual. Since it was eating quite a bit of oil (2hrs per quart), I decided to install all new Millenium cylinders. All was going fine until they took a closer look inside after removing the jugs - many signs of cam corrosion. The mechanic's statement was that my lifter faces looked like the pockmarked surface of the moon. That of course resulted in damage to the cam, so now I'm in for a complete overhaul (costs more than my first house).

In connection with your statement, my engine had less than 700 hours on it. It was rebuilt a bit more than fifteen years ago. I've owned it for about three years, putting about 70 to 100 hrs per year on it. The mechanic did a bit of backtracking and we discovered that not only did the engine's time average only about 30 hrs per year, it did so because the airplane sat for a bit just after its rebuild. Essentially this was almost a guarantee of this type of damage. The rule of thumb I was given some years back is that if most airplanes do not get at least 60 hours per year on them (some prefer to see 100), it is unlikely that their engines will reach even half the TBO. Sure was the case here.

Products such as AvBlend or Microlon can dramatically aid this issue, but there's nothing better than consistant use. So, simply said, GO FLY!!!
 

Craig

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Jupiter, Florida
Building

Thanks, guys for all the info. Really helped a lot.

Yes, Wally - you are correct. We set up a partnership in the airplane.
 

JimC

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Dec 29, 2006
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141
J-3 Cubs had the 65 or 75 I think. I seem to remember the 65-75-85 are all the same 145 cubic inches. And the hp difference is different cam(?), carb jetting and redline rpm.


Um, no. The engines are the A-40 (about 110 cubic inches), the A-65, A-75, and A-80 (about 170 cubic inches), the C-75 & C-85 (about 190 cubic inches, and the C-90 and O-200 (200.9 cubic inches). All of these have been used on cubs. Note that none of them have 145 cubic inches (not even the C-125 and C-145), and that the 85 is not in the same series as the 65 (you were probably thinking about the A-80).
All the best,
JimC
 

facthunter

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Mar 14, 2007
Messages
2
Location
Australia.
i have a cont-16F with about 1450 hours total. Has good compression, but exhaust guides are worn oval to about 0055" guides have never been replaced. I don't like running excess clearance as the valve heads occasionally break off in some engines. The engine does not need to be certified,The bottom end was done about 600 hours ago and pistons replaced less than 200 hours ago Are these engines prone to valve failure? ( I know some seem to be suffering with sticky valves but this may be a result of using mogas or just rusting due to infrequent use. I have full machine shop facilities here including accurate grinders. Where can I get guides, valves. springs. I feel that i should get oversize OD. guides and individually fit them to the parent bore, by grinding the OD to suit . COMMENTS PLEASE.
Nev....
 
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