Continental and leaning.

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Doran Jaffas

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Jun 25, 2019
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Hello All,
As many of you know I have an 0-200 powered Tailwind W8. Not many with this engine I have been told. Reason? Several, mostly about speed.
I am an oddity of sorts I guess but speed is not the primary requirement for me. It needs to be married with at least reasonable climb or in my case..more than reasonable climb and yes, I am willing to sacrifice some speed...to a point. That being said, my new propeller does a good job of being a reasonable compromise of speed with an accelerated climb rate. This is matched to the above mentioned power plant. Which brings me to the title of the thread.
It turns out that this engine requires leaning before take off, during climb and cruise. If that is not done, you get a real good impersonation of an ignition issue, even at lower altitudes. Can give one a hmmmm moment and cause ones wife to be uncomfortable. I have complete confidence in 625MS and having flown it today in hot and humid weather for 2 hrs with no issues now that I'm doing the leaning . Felt great.
Anyone else experienced this?
Picture was taken today making a low pass down 27 at KY70-Ionia, Michigan.
 

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TFF

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Certified airplanes have manuals to dumb down the operation. Full rich means no mixture screwups. If you know your airplane, nothing wrong with leaning. Best power would probably be a little much for climb. Piston helicopters have to be leaned some or they will not fly many times. If I have a single EGT probe, when it just comes off the stop gives good takeoff power. Still 300 degrees before peak.

The Continental is usually on the W8 tailwinds. The W10 was designed specifically for the Lycomings although there is not that much difference in reality. Not that big engines have not been put on W8s either.
 

Doran Jaffas

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Jun 25, 2019
Messages
179
Certified airplanes have manuals to dumb down the operation. Full rich means no mixture screwups. If you know your airplane, nothing wrong with leaning. Best power would probably be a little much for climb. Piston helicopters have to be leaned some or they will not fly many times. If I have a single EGT probe, when it just comes off the stop gives good takeoff power. Still 300 degrees before peak.

The Continental is usually on the W8 tailwinds. The W10 was designed specifically for the Lycomings although there is not that much difference in reality. Not that big engines have not been put on W8s either.
Appreciate your reply.
 

Pops

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Always wanted a Tailwind. Went to buy one many years ago. My feet wouldn't fit under the fuel tank to work the rudder pedals.
 

Marc Zeitlin

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Dec 11, 2015
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Tehachapi, CA
It turns out that this engine requires leaning before take off, during climb and cruise. If that is not done, you get a real good impersonation of an ignition issue, even at lower altitudes.
I'm no engine expert, but it sounds to me as though your carburetor is jetted way too rich.
 

wsimpso1

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Saline Michigan
Something not right here. At sea level, full rich and wide open throttle should make as much power as the bird will make. If you have to lean it at WOT at the 1000' and less that is Michigan airports, you are probably way rich. I just realized Marc said that too. I think that I would have a look at the carb... Main jets, mixture enrichment valve, something.

Bill
 

akwrencher

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Oct 16, 2012
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Gustavus, AK
Thatone

Friend I fly with has an old strait tail 150. He never touches the mixture around home. No problems. Wouldn't hurt to check out the carb. Maybe the float is leaking? I presume you have had this bird a while, is this a new problem? I've had old brass floats leak and sink, making the engine run rich. Just a thought.
 

Doran Jaffas

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Jun 25, 2019
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179
Thatone

Friend I fly with has an old strait tail 150. He never touches the mixture around home. No problems. Wouldn't hurt to check out the carb. Maybe the float is leaking? I presume you have had this bird a while, is this a new problem? I've had old brass floats leak and sink, making the engine run rich. Just a thought.
I've had it almost 2 years and just past 90 hrs including a 6 month winter lay off the first year. This summer has been exceptional in humidity with density altitudes tripling by mid morning and going up from there. So, though this is a new issue to me, it may not be new to the engine. Not a bad idea to give the carb another going over but the power and rpms are there. I also think a call to Continental may be in order.
Thanks for the input
Doran Jaffas
 

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BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
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97FL, Florida, USA
I have an 0-200 powered Tailwind W8. Not many with this engine I have been told. Reason? Several, mostly about speed.
I am an oddity of sorts I guess but speed is not the primary requirement for me.
The only Tailwind that I have flown (circa 1967) was a W8 with a C 85. Nice, light airplane that set no speed records, but flew nicely, and was fast for a two seat HBA with 85 HP.

Also, in the late 1960’s, I frequently flew a new 7 ECA (115 HP) and a new 7 KCAB (150 HP). The KCAB was much better for aerobatics, but for normal flying I much preferred the ECA because, with less weight up front, it handled better. Speed is good when in a rush to get somewhere. Aerobatic capability is good for challenging one’s ability to conquer gravity and the airplane. Handling is king for simply enjoying flight.


BJC
 
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