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Composite wing ribs

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ultralights

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What do the ribs weigh in comparison to a aluminum rib doing the same job? How do you hold the fabric to them? Seriously I am curious.
Rougly 25-35% of weight saving. You can bond the fabric to a composite rib or rib lacing or may be clips.
 

ultralights

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Thanks, I did not notice that it had a wooden spar. Bet that you are correct on the reason for the separate fuel tank.

Now my question becomes, "Why the wooden spar?"


BJC
We not know.
may be:
this wing is an new version from a wood and fabric wing and designer did not advance to a complete carbon wing.
the designer think that carbon spar would be stiffer that wood and "the plane is more uncomfortable in turbulence".
manufacturing of carbon spar is more problematic
or all! who knows! only the designer...
 

ultralights

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But the way they bond the foam rib to the skin is not strong. A 4" wide tape should tape the skin to both side of the foam ribs.
I was referring to a carbon rib like a aluminum rib in a fabric covering wing, that was the question of blane.c
 

ultralights

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I found another picture of wing with composite foam ribs, but I not remember that plane is, someone recognizes?. This is similar that first picture but the foam rib have not laminate skin. Forward spar the wing skin is sandwich, rear spar the wing skin is solid.

DSCN4365.jpg
 

berridos

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madrid
I really don´t understand anything in that wing construction.
The leading edge is squared and needs a prothesis.
The root rib is like 10 cm from the root.
Why so many foam ribs?
Why only unskinned ribs?
Why such a huge trailing edge extension on the lower mold half? Shouldnt be the extension on the upper half?
The spar caps are white (no carbon?)
These points looks like a completely absurd arrangement.
 

Battler Britton

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Montpellier,LFNG (Candillargues)
I really don´t understand anything in that wing construction.
The leading edge is squared and needs a prothesis.
The root rib is like 10 cm from the root.
Why so many foam ribs?
Why only unskinned ribs?
Why such a huge trailing edge extension on the lower mold half? Shouldnt be the extension on the upper half?
The spar caps are white (no carbon?)
These points looks like a completely absurd arrangement.
that is the oposite.....
skin com from mold.
The leading edge come from an other mold and is the shutting piece of the wing, when glued,
ribs are Klegecel, and are structural with the carbon skin witch can be thiner on the trailing edge. the full span sloted flaperons are at that place , althow, this part need to be strong for that reason but the carbon skin have to be a little more " mild" than the part ," leading edge/ spar, witch is wood and carbon. The front part of the wing is a big tank

this arrangement prouved to be very fonctional , it is MCR, long range wing, and, if you know a little those MCR , you should know how efficient they are, for the power. Light, fast.

It is also , more or less, the technolgy I choose for my plane, abeit smaller and with a woob box spar (beacause I got it)
 

Aviator168

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Vigilant1

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That looks like a wood main and drag spar to me.
I think that is his point. Technically, wood is a composite material. "Nature's composite." Like an "artificial composite", it is non-homogenous, with rigid fibers bound in a less-rigid matrix. Wood, like other composites, is also anisotropic (has different properties in different directions: the strength across the grain is not the same as the strength along the grain, etc). Plywood would be a good example of a multiple ply wood composite material, but even a single 2x4 is an example of a composite.
 

Aviator168

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I think that is his point. Technically, wood is a composite material. "Nature's composite." Like an "artificial composite", it is non-homogenous, with rigid fibers bound in a less-rigid matrix. Wood, like other composites, is also anisotropic (has different properties in different directions: the strength across the grain is not the same as the strength along the grain, etc). Plywood would be a good example of a multiple ply wood composite material, but even a single 2x4 is an example of a composite.
I have to loosen up. Been a long week. :lick:
 
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