Commercial License Required?

Discussion in 'Rules and Regulations / Flight Safety / Better Pil' started by JackTarClay, Mar 26, 2014.

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  1. Mar 27, 2014 #21

    bmcj

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    I agree (to a point). The 1970 regs were much more reasonable and clear. The people at the local FAA offices are almost always friendly and helpful (then and now). I can't speak authoritatively about the higher brass in the organization, but from way down here at our level, it certainly looks like they are becoming less GA friendly.

    Jack Tar Clay... pursue your commercial license... it's not that hard to get. Buy a cheap, already-flying low-powered plane to build your time in (an N-numbered ultralight-like homebuilt aircraft works well, something like a Kolb, Airbike, Minimax, N3 Pup, Legal Eagle, etc that you can pick up for $5-10,000). Rent a plane only when you have to accomplish certain skills that you can't do in your time-builder aircraft. This will get you to your commercial license quickly and cheaply, then you can fly for profit without worries (at least non-passenger service).
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
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  2. Mar 27, 2014 #22

    JackTarClay

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    Thanks, I'll have to read up on that. Would I be hard pressed to find a CFI that will train in an ultralight/homebuilt or is that common? I just assumed they would want to be in a 'tried-and-true' bird.

    It could really work out because aircraft rental is the most expensive component to the training, and I know I'm gonna end up getting my own (I may build one :)) after I get my license so why not get a jump on it! Thanks again for all the advice yall. Talking about it keeps the dream alive heh...I need to get on it.
     
  3. Mar 27, 2014 #23

    bmcj

    bmcj

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    I was assuming that you already have your private ticket. As a private pilot, you can fly the homebuilt without an instructor sign-off, though I would at least get someone who is experienced in the same type of plane to give you at least some form of checkout before you fly it for the first time.

    Some CFI's will train in a homebuilt that YOU own, but my point was to build your solo and crosscountry time in the small cheap plane, then rent a plane for the dual requirements (20 hours, I think). The cheap plane you buy to build time in probably won't have the needed equipment (instruments, radios, lights) for the dual requirement, just by virtue of it being light and cheap.

    By the way, since you are in Dallas, you should take a trip ofer to Addison Airport (AirNav: KADS - Addison Airport) and check out American Flyers (Flight Training Addison, Texas American Flyers). They have some very affordable packages available for commercial, instrument, or instructor ratings.
     
  4. Mar 27, 2014 #24

    JackTarClay

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    I see. I was thinking along the route of taking out a loan to both purchase an aircraft and cover the training costs. Start with PPL and go to CPL after that; only coming back when resources allow to get my instrument rating and possibly multi-engine. If I can find an airworthy plane for $5,000 that isn't too light when it comes to avionics, and find an instructor to train me in it; I could make out saving atleast 20% total cost.

    The training at Addison appears to be on the upper end of the scale. The cheapest around is outside of Ft. Worth probably, near Weatherford, but I'm a stone's throw from KGPM and they're quite reasonable. It's also where I took my discovery flight. I imagine I'll do it there.
     
  5. Mar 27, 2014 #25

    bmcj

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    If you are still training and looking for some cost savings, you might consider soaring clubs. Much of your soaring time and skills can be counted toward a powered license. The Soaring Society of America (link: Soaring Society of America) is a good place to start. Check out their map (link: Soaring Society of America) for schools and clubs. Typically, clubs will be cheaper than schools, so shop around... don't just settle on the first one you find. Here is what I found in the DFW area (note - I have no personal knowledge of these schools or clubs, so cannot vouch for them):


    Decatur, TX
    North Texas Soaring


    Midlothian, TX
    Texas Soaring Association Home Page


    Waxahachie, TX
    Big Q Aviation - Flying with Carol Walker
     
  6. Mar 27, 2014 #26

    JackTarClay

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    That didn't cross my mind. Couldn't hurt right? I'll have to read up on that too. Thanks man.
     
  7. Mar 27, 2014 #27

    Turd Ferguson

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    I'd put more thought into the process because the above plan is the least efficient way to earn certificates and ratings. Need to fill in the space between ~60ish hrs and 250 hrs with something. Otherwise, you'll pay twice for instrument rating hrs.
     
  8. Mar 27, 2014 #28

    JackTarClay

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    Hmm, yeah I must not understand it yet. I assumed that the amount of hours was less a factor, and rather, the lesson content determined what cert to log for. Basically pulling all of this from down below, but I'll read more... and then read again. I appreciate the tip.
     
  9. Mar 27, 2014 #29

    bmcj

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    Any flight school or instructor (power or sailplane) can help clarify that for you easier than we can with shotgun posts.
     
  10. Sep 16, 2014 #30

    59Manche

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    First of all, sorry for posting on an old thread. A common misconception is once you get you commercial ticket you can go out and fly for profit. Fact is if you're beholden to the public on flying for profit, it'll almost always end up in the Part 135 bucket. That's a completely different ball of wax.

    If you fly for an organization that uses aircraft to fly its own people, cargo or missions, its Part 91 commercial flying. I was surprised to find that a lot of the commercial oral was on the subject of what was and wasn't legal for the newly commercial pilot to do once I left there with a temp certificate in my wallet.
     

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