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Cobalt CO50

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BJC

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Thanks.

From the linked site:

"The School of Aerospace Engineering offers two master of science (MS) degrees. The first is the "Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering" degree and is generally referred to as a "designated degree." The second is the "Master of Science" degree which is referred to as an "undesignated degree." The only difference between these two degrees is that the "designated degree" requires that the candidate must have completed all academic course work required for a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering degree. Refer to Appendix A for the courses required for the Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering degree at Georgia Tech."

So they do award a MSAE degree.

Later:

I just exchanged emails with David, and he said that he was awarded a "MSc in Aerospace Engineering" from Georgia Tech.


BJC
 

cheapracer

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Well thanks goodness we got that cleared up so now we can get onto Rita, Cobalt's Receptionist.

She says she's done a Marvis Beacon typing course but I'm not so sure, I saw a news release that had an 'e' before the 'i' after a 'c', can you "Super Snoops" check that out please so we can clear up all the assertions and safely get back to talking about the aircraft.
 

Kyle Boatright

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Looking at some design details however, seems they still have a long way to go. Canard fairing in is just one where I'm curious how that'll work out.
The canard attach reminds me of an F1 front wing.

I'd feel a lot better about this project if they had built a full scale demo airframe with all of the warts and duct tape and flown that thing for 1,000 hours. No need for shiny paint or leather seats. Shiny paint on a barely flying (or non-flying) demo airframe makes me think of Moeller...
 

BoKu

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Resurrecting this thread out of curiosity: Has anybody heard anything more about the Valkyrie? They did that one test flight back in November 2015 or so, and I've heard nothing of it since. Is anybody here plugged into the program such that they can give us an update?

Thanks, Bob K.
 

autoreply

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They're still busy bashing the FAA:
Cobalt

It seems to me that Loury's goal isn't to certify and produce the CO50. Finding new investors and bashing the FAA at the same time is apparently more profitable than certifying the plane and selling a lot of them...
 

BJC

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They're still busy bashing the FAA:
Cobalt

It seems to me that Loury's goal isn't to certify and produce the CO50. Finding new investors and bashing the FAA at the same time is apparently more profitable than certifying the plane and selling a lot of them...
It sems time to revise the old adage of "The way to make a small fortune in aviation is to start wth a large fortune" to something along the lines of "The way to make a fortune in aviation is to create a slick promotional program, scam investors, but never, never deliver an actual airplane."


BJC
 

BoKu

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Exhuming this one to check if it still has a pulse. Has anybody heard any scuttlebutt on the Valkyrie lately?

Test flights, sightings, anything besides smoke and mirrors?

Their website says they were going to be at the Hayward airport for the 16 October open house, but there doesn't seem to have been any coverage of it.

Thanks, Bob K.
 

BoKu

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Lost track of this until today, when I Googled it to see what was up. It looks like there was an accident back in September out at the former Castle AFB where they're doing testing:

The pilot stated that immediately after rotation, he experienced extreme difficulty controlling the airplane. As the airspeed increased, he began to attain some controllability and climbed to about 1,000 feet above ground level. He determined that the ailerons were ineffective but was able to use the rudder for directional control. The pitch stability was sporadic with him experiencing intermittent pitch up and down movements. After about 20 minutes of manipulating the flight controls and practicing climbing and descending using the trim, he managed to stabilize the airplane around 90 kts. He reasoned that he would be able to land the airplane while configured at an increased airspeed using steady thrust control and the rudder for directional control. During landing, with the airplane about 10 feet above the runway surface, the airplane experienced a loss of lift and landed hard. The impact resulted in the right landing-gear leg separating and the airplane subsequently made a 180-degree; the right-wing spar sustained damage.
Other than that, there seems to have been very little to report. I did speak with a test pilot familiar with the program who had nothing good to say about it, but he declined to be quoted about it.

--Bob K.
 

Victor Bravo

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Oh look... another exotic airplane computer generated rendering arrived in my inbox, and... wow... look sweetie, it gets even better... there's an article in some non-aviation magazine verifiing that instead of some old dusty airplane manufacturer with a 100 year track record it's a brand NEW startup company claiming it already has a bunch of Bay Area investors... and look, even though there's no photographs of a completed airplane anywhere to be seen, the article says it's already in flight test !

Blather, Rinse, Repeat :)

Blather up and down about something that is either not above boards or over-hyped past the point of credibility.

Get money from a bunch of investors, wealthy tech company bozos, or try your hand at a government subsidy. When your bank account is full, rinse away all the debt with a quick BK filing.

When you get back from the Caymans with your bank deposit receipt... repeat.

I should have an infomercial telling people how to do this... forget flipping houses, 2018 is the year of flipping investors... I got it ... "Scam-Wow" !

shamwow.jpg
 
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pictsidhe

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Where do they find all the gullible investors?
I'm sure that most of the aviation industry now automatically files new renderware projects under 'scam' unless they actually come up with hardware.
 

BJC

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Where do they find all the gullible investors?
I'm sure that most of the aviation industry now automatically files new renderware projects under 'scam' unless they actually come up with hardware.
Now you are into thread drift, since it is obvious that you are referring to ICON.


BJC
 

Vigilant1

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Where do they find all the gullible investors?
I'm sure that most of the aviation industry now automatically files new renderware projects under 'scam' unless they actually come up with hardware.
You've identified the solution--the companies will increasingly need to look beyond the aviation industry to snag new investors. Market the plane as some type of "waverunner for the third dimension," etc. Heck, I'd bet it has been long enough since Moller that a new generation of investors is ready for their personal VTOL.
 

BJC

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Cobalt has ceased operations in July 2018.

The Valkyrie aircraft is now entirely designed, tested and manufactured in California by Centauri Aircraft Company, Inc., owned and managed by David Loury, with the ongoing help of its Early Adopters.

BJC
 

lelievre12

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The Valkyrie Cobalt was damaged by the test pilot on his first flight. https://app.ntsb.gov/pdfgenerator/ReportGeneratorFile.ashx?EventID=20170906X25126&AKey=1&RType=Final&IType=LA

Apparently the 'expert' test pilot tried to land the (canard) aircraft in full stall like a conventional aircraft rather than keeping the power on and flying it down. He hit hard, broke off the gear and killed the company. Shame as the plane had flown before successfully with another pilot whom obviously knew that canards are different.

So test pilots are not infallible and indeed many builders test fly their own planes. However usually the designs are proven or tested by others. In the Raptor case the basic airframe/layout is quite similar to the Cozy IV/Velocity etc etc. family and so that is good. Nevertheless there are quite a few changes!.

Therefore before flight, I agree that a long, long runway is needed to hop and land before circuits are attempted. In this case control authority/flutter, engine temps and W&B will all need to be verified before >10 feet. After that the test cards will gradually expand the envelope to confirm dynamic stability, but no way at that airport. Too short.

Pete could do it but I must admit his early tests resulting in the crazy aileron flutter did not fill me with confidence.
 
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BoKu

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The Valkyrie Cobalt was damaged by the test pilot on his first flight...

...Apparently the 'expert' test pilot tried to land the (canard) aircraft in full stall like a conventional aircraft rather than keeping the power on and flying it down. He hit hard, broke off the gear and killed the company. Shame as the plane had flown before successfully with another pilot whom obviously knew that canards are different...
The Valkyrie was a deathtrap that the pilot was lucky to survive. What "killed" the company (in quotes because it appears to be one of those zombies that keeps coming back) is the fact that their airplane was poorly designed and had miserable performance and even worse handling.
 

Marc Zeitlin

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The Valkyrie Cobalt was damaged by the test pilot on his first flight... Apparently the 'expert' test pilot...
To set the record straight, the pilot of the Valkyrie (Cobalt was the company name, the airplane's name is "Valkyrie", and the new company that is developing the plane is named "Centauri", so it's the "Centauri Valkyrie" now) was an ATP, NOT a test pilot, and had never flown a canard aircraft before. However experienced he may have been in big iron, he was NOT familiar with small, single engine pusher canard aircraft, and had no transition flights in other canards. I know you have "expert" in quotes, but he was not.

... Shame as the plane had flown before successfully with another pilot whom obviously knew that canards are different.
"Successfully" has many different possible interpretations. What's yours? Got off the ground? Flew around in circles at low bank angles? Didn't melt the engine? Was able to land without destroying itself?

This discussion should be in the "Cobalt" or "Valkyrie" thread - I believe there was one...
 
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