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rbrochey

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Oct 17, 2010
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1,569
Location
Gallup, New Mexico USA
Hi all, RBrochey live from the last bit of physical therapy before I can get back to building. I was wondering if anyone could tell me what would be a good entry (simple) CNC set up would be, I know about zero and want to learn how to do it. I've seen all kinds of cool little set ups out there but end up more confused!!!


Thanks!!!!!
 

rtfm

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Jan 3, 2008
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Location
Brisbane, Australia
I started with a CNC setup called a Lowrider2. It was cheap, but DO NOT be lured into this.

I spent some modest money, and bought one of the Openbuilds models - A Workbee 1500 x 1500. You're in New Mexico, so the best place to try is WorkBee Version 2.2 CNC Machine - 1500 x 1500mm - Maker Store USA

Cost: $1254 USD

I don't think you'll find a quality CNC router for less. Sure, there is a bit to learn, but with a CNC buddy it's actually quite simple.

Mine is EXCELLENT, by the way...
 

ElectricFlyer

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Dec 16, 2015
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Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada
I think learning to use a CNC would be easier than learning a CAD program to put on the CNC. I have taken a couple of stabs a FreeCad o_O... following Ytubr vid,,,I did that step why is mine not working:mad:
 

rtfm

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I use Sketchup. It's free, extremely simple to use. I've tried FreeCad also - but Sketchup is far more intuitive.
 

Jay Kempf

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Warren, VT USA
I think learning to use a CNC would be easier than learning a CAD program to put on the CNC. I have taken a couple of stabs a FreeCad o_O... following Ytubr vid,,,I did that step why is mine not working:mad:
Uh no. CNC is not an easy learning curve. There are quite a few CAD systems where you can learn very quickly to design things that can't possibly be manufactured. CNC tells you that you couldn't manufacture your designs in a very direct way. Then you get better by experiment or if you have a great mentor. Baby steps.

Been through steep learning curves in multiple mid to high end CAD and CNC packages. Still boggles my mind how much capability is at your finger tips if you are willing and able to suffer through. Only really limited by your imagination. It is a good time to be a technical person. Fusion360 is amazing me every year.
 

Hephaestus

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Big thing is to learn it in something you don't have the post processing nightmare.

Kind of why I'm fusion 360 based... Getting from a drawing to a part to a gcode path is relatively painless.

MPCNC / lowryder is cheaper for a home built. But does have some limitations... There's hundreds of options commercially. Being able to slide a 4x8 sheet in is nice - but probably want to start smaller - start with smaller mistakes first :)
 

girodreamer

Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2020
Messages
39
I entered cnc one and a half year ago, it took me 2 days of training and a couple of months of probing but was OK... now I can't say I am a pro cnc machiniste of course but I did many things for my gyro .




but I was really lucky to find the right teacher who sold me a chinses cnc he had prepared to work straight away .. and I did litterally tens and tens of parts .

if I had had to start from zero and discover all myself ... I would have given up

definitely the soft you have to use is fusion360, you have all in it you can model and also manufacture ( generate the G code for the cnc),

there are so many tutorial in english that you can learn all by yourself ( at least as for the design module) for the manufacture module it is a bit more complicated to learnt this by yourself , but ok I could show you the basics

feel free to ask me every question I will help you if you need
 
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Jay Kempf

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That's a nice machine. Very well thought out. Machines like this are not expensive and the small amount of welding large rectangles of steel in this is a way better strategy then the normal bolt together moving gantry machines. Just takes more space for the bed to move. Dual Y drives is key. Very nice. The bed tapped with holes on a pattern is very nice as well. I am putting a plate like that on an angle vise on my router just for doing small metal parts.

For the OP this is a great DIY approach for a smallish machine. All of the linears and intricate bits are available for cheap on aliexpress and ebay. There are a few USA sources for this stuff that are OK like VXB or automationdirect... Avidcnc has full kits for a bit more that are really nice. If I was going to start over I would buy a kit from Avid.
 

Vigilant1

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Regarding flatbed CNC: Of course it would be nice to have my own machine, but for a hobbiest new to CNC (and CAD), I'd think using a machine at a co-op makerspace, etc would be a better start. It would let me concentrate on CAD first before taking on the whole separate task of building a CNC device. And, I'd get in-person assistance, get to see if I enjoy it, save a lot of $$, floor space, and I'll have my first "end product" parts a lot faster (which is a motivator).
If it turns out I love CNC, want to do a lot of it, and want the convenience of doing it in my shop, then I can eventually make a well informed decision on what type of rig to buy.
Similar: I'm lucky enough to have a very nice community woodshop nearby. Better tools than I can afford, somebody else keeps the bits sharp and the saws in alignment, everything is set up and operational (no need to put away the planer so I have room for the table saw), etc. The $4/hr is well worth it.
 
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Jay Kempf

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I am the community maker space :) Although I haven't told anybody cause I know what will happen... I so wish there was a $4/hr shop with everybody else's stuff that I could just go use. One person always spoils those sorts of things for everyone else.
 

Hephaestus

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Jun 25, 2014
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Actually for learning - one of those chinesium <300$ "Pro 3018" or similar desktop cnc's is a great way to learn (just build a box to house/contain/control the mess and noise)

While there's some differences hogging rough cuts with a 3/8"+ bit, most of the finer points you can learn on a smaller one... Then decide if you need/want the bigger one as you learn.
 

Bill-Higdon

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Feb 6, 2011
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Location
Salem, Oregon, USA
Actually for learning - one of those chinesium <300$ "Pro 3018" or similar desktop cnc's is a great way to learn (just build a box to house/contain/control the mess and noise)

While there's some differences hogging rough cuts with a 3/8"+ bit, most of the finer points you can learn on a smaller one... Then decide if you need/want the bigger one as you learn.
Just be careful of the software a lot of it is loaded with Malware. I have one of the 3018's little brothers & all of the software you find for it from China has "Interesting software" included free of charge. There's good software avaalable on github & the Facebook group is good as well
 

Hephaestus

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Just be careful of the software a lot of it is loaded with Malware. I have one of the 3018's little brothers & all of the software you find for it from China has "Interesting software" included free of charge. There's good software avaalable on github & the Facebook group is good as well
Yeah, applies to pretty much all the chinese products... 3d printers, the little lasers, the CNCs... Most of the time you can do 100000x better than the software supplied.
 

rotax618

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Joined
Oct 31, 2005
Messages
1,334
Location
Evans Head Australia
You can design, build and run any CNC using open source software, Freecad for design, Arduino GRBL for post processing, UGS universal gcode sender. Gcode can be generated from Inkscape or Freecad.
Airfoil .dat files can be imported into Freecad and gcode generated from the Path Workbench.
I have only purchased one software program, that is Estlcam, it allows the generation of Gcode from complex 3D .STL files so you can machine double sided things like this.
23869C4A-48CA-46F3-B601-650C85C6746E.jpeg32A9D7D4-26F2-4020-9B05-5A45426AAAD0.jpeg
 

girodreamer

Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2020
Messages
39
excuse gentlemen , is it possible to delete the messages I have posted please ?
most of what I have posted did not start any discussion, reaction nothing,
it is useless to leave all the useless messages that nobody replies to ,
do you know if it is possible to unsubcribe from this forum and how please ?
regards
G



I entered cnc one and a half year ago, it took me 2 days of training and a couple of months of probing but was OK... now I can't say I am a pro cnc machiniste of course but I did many things for my gyro .




but I was really lucky to find the right teacher who sold me a chinses cnc he had prepared to work straight away .. and I did litterally tens and tens of parts .

if I had had to start from zero and discover all myself ... I would have given up

definitely the soft you have to use is fusion360, you have all in it you can model and also manufacture ( generate the G code for the cnc),

there are so many tutorial in english that you can learn all by yourself ( at least as for the design module) for the manufacture module it is a bit more complicated to learnt this by yourself , but ok I could show you the basics

feel free to ask me every question I will help you if you need
 

David H

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2019
Messages
17
Hello All, I agree with Vigilant1 that a co-op "Makerspace" is a viable alternative. These are usually connected to Colleges and Universities with Community involvement programs. In my area RPI developed such a space in Troy, NY that I was able to "buy" an expert's assistance. I could have joined the makerspace and done it myself but for 2 4x8 sheets of ply it was less time consuming to buy expert assistance. I have attached a couple pictures of what the CNC instructor did with (another Volksplane builder's - most of you probably know him) provided files.
 

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