Cirrus Stall Accident

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TFF

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First mistake, trying to force the plane down on a runway that was clearly miss timed. Pretty much guaranteed the aerodynamic mistake.
I know someone putting together a Cirrus VK30. I commented that it would be nice to add the leading edge extensions; wings are about 90% the same. I bet the VK is nasty to stall.
 

SVSUSteve

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I know someone putting together a Cirrus VK30. I commented that it would be nice to add the leading edge extensions; wings are about 90% the same. I bet the VK is nasty to stall.
The VK-30 is one of the few aircraft (of which more than a few have been built) that has a more questionable safety record than the SR22 and SR20.
 

Turd Ferguson

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Based on the number built and flown to date, difficult to conclude a VK-30 is a death trap. A very high performance airplane, take away the aggressive flight testing and the airframe mechanical malfunction, the results are no different from any other very high performance homebuilt. It's not an airplane where a deadstick landing is a realistic option after powerplant failure.

TTF, I didn't know the wing had that much commonality with the Cirrus SR's. Certainly, installing NASA wing cuffs is something worth investigating. We know a least one turbine powered VK-30, N44VK had a nasty stall at 33% MAC after an aggravated entry. The whole episode was videotaped from the cockpit.
 

SVSUSteve

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Based on the number built and flown to date, difficult to conclude a VK-30 is a death trap. A very high performance airplane, take away the aggressive flight testing and the airframe mechanical malfunction, the results are no different from any other very high performance homebuilt. It's not an airplane where a deadstick landing is a realistic option after powerplant failure.
Right. A lot of it, as with most airplanes, has to do with who is flying it and under what circumstances. Very few aircraft of that category in the hands of an inexperienced or inattentive pilot for any length of time is going to have a marginal to poor record. That is what afflicts most Cirrus aircraft and has given them an unenviable reputation (the poor to non-existent occupant protection and tendency to burn if you look at it cross notwithstanding).
 

SVSUSteve

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VK-30 was an ambitious attempt
Agreed. Even though I think the Cirrus line leaves much to be desired, I still have a lot of respect for the Klapmeiers. Aerodynamically, they achieved something of note. A few overlooked "non-flying" design considerations and trying to sell some of them to the public- or rather the specific market share they chose- is what got them into trouble in regards to the record of the aircraft.
 

TFF

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I know of a VK30 that was just finished and flying so the flying vs crashed is now over 50%. It is a beast of a project. I believe most have been some type of engine failure which is much different accident than not being able to fly it. The complexity is way above most. Easily build 2-3 RV 7s in the same amount of time.
 

Detego

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... A lot of it .. has to do with who is flying it

... in the hands of an inexperienced or inattentive pilot
... That is what afflicts most Cirrus aircraft

... the poor to non-existent occupant protection
... tendency to burn if you look at it cross


From what is stated in the "Cirrus Stall Accident" video; the PILOT took off with an INSTRUCTOR, who together stalled
the plane into the ground, "well below pattern altitude". The fire was most likely caused by the fuel tanks bursting on
impact, spilling Aviation Fuel over the hot engine. No safety device would have saved the occupants in this crash.

Maybe, to help with "the poor to non-existent occupant protection", CIRRUS should provide flame retardant underwear
for the occupants, and instruct them to stare straight-ahead, while flying their aircraft. It would also be advisable that
the pilot, NOT crash the plane into the ground!

Let's hope CIRRUS AIRCRAFT incorporates some of the above safety advise, to make for a more safer, flying aircraft.







“The desire for safety stands against every great and noble enterprise.” - Cornelius Tacitus
 

SVSUSteve

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Based on the video there seems to be a LACK of situational awareness, and commonsense.
With regards to the pilots in question, on this, I have to say we do agree. That is what I was referring to when I mentioned inattentive pilots.
 

topspeed100

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I wonder if the really narrow fuselages behing cockpit have anything to do with these kinda accidents..similar happened here few years ago with a Eurostar.
 

TFF

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If you have flown a Cirrus you would know that the control forces are high enough to convince you that you are not in an Extra 300 but more like a DC10. You yank and bank a heavy airplane pretending to be a Pitts or Extra and when it snaps on you which is what your after if your in a Pitts or Extra, the only friend you have is altitude to get it straight. That is why there is a 1500 ft AGL minimum to do aerobatics. They might not have intended to be doing aerobatics but they were trying to control the plane in the same way when there was no need; they created their own emergency.
 
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