Chilton DW-1 build in NZ

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

Tony Spezio

Active Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2019
Messages
33
Thank you. It has been a truly incredible event. We are used to the occasional hurricane, and are prepared to deal with them, but this storm has been an entirely different matter. I am far enough inland to have had only a modest amount of rain. My best friend lives on the northwest side of Houston and got roughly four feet of rain. He got lucky, as his neighborhood drained well and became an island, and he had enough food on hand to feed his family. He has a lot of friends and co-workers nearby that weren't so lucky, and had to be evacuated by boat and by helicopter. It will likely be many months before their homes are inhabitable again. We will be dealing with the aftermath for a long time to come.

I know we have other members here from that area, and I wish them well.

I have a sister in Houston, she was flooded from the one before but water just up to the gutters on the road this time.
 

Jay Kempf

Curmudgeon in Training (CIT)
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Messages
4,523
Location
Warren, VT USA
Why is it that such an overall simple design like the Chilton is just so drop dead gorgeous? Sometimes all the little things just come together to make a whole that is better than any single detail. The little wrapped gear covers are so period and every so nice and the rest of the lines just belong together. The opposite is something like the A10: it has all the right details and it is extra homely as a result. Course its mother probably loves it anyway :)
 
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
254
Location
San Diego, CA
The Chilton was designed by two young Brits who were recent graduates of the DeHavilland Technical School in the late 1930’s. With that in mind, it’s not entirely surprising that some of DeHavilland’s classic lines would be ingrained in their design style.

I think back then they relied a lot more on ‘looks right, flys right’ and there is definitely something to be argued for that design philosophy. I will say though, it is a time consuming but enjoyable build!
 

jm.gray

Active Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2016
Messages
25
Location
New Zealand
Please note DH type windscreen to allow me to grab hold of to get in and out. The original had just a curved perspex one.
This old fella is no longer flexible enough to hop in and out like a jack rabbit
 

jm.gray

Active Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2016
Messages
25
Location
New Zealand
Hi folks. Since you last saw my Chilton aircraft, time in hospital, escalating cost of materials and one or two issues with solving carb. icing due to the carb. being mounted underneath the motor, sucking up moisture and subsequently icing up the carb... one or two mods. and all has been solved.
I am afraid that I cannot fly the little beauty because my age is the same as the original aircraft built in 1937.

Anyway here are some pics. of the finished aircraft.

Performance is good with a 65hp VW. 112mph cruise, with 3200 revs, a speed of 125mph was attained. With flaps it lands at 45mph. These are the figures up to date. The aircraft is still being wrung out by a very well qualified test pilot.
 

Attachments

  • 0-5.jpeg
    0-5.jpeg
    45.8 KB · Views: 48
  • 0.jpeg
    0.jpeg
    20.7 KB · Views: 45
  • 0-1.jpeg
    0-1.jpeg
    60 KB · Views: 44
  • 0-3.jpeg
    0-3.jpeg
    60.8 KB · Views: 40
  • Video 20220312_160643.mp4
    23.1 MB
Joined
Jan 27, 2012
Messages
1,354
Location
Glendale, CA
Hi folks. Since you last saw my Chilton aircraft, time in hospital, escalating cost of materials and one or two issues with solving carb. icing due to the carb. being mounted underneath the motor, sucking up moisture and subsequently icing up the carb... one or two mods. and all has been solved.
I am afraid that I cannot fly the little beauty because my age is the same as the original aircraft built in 1937.

Anyway here are some pics. of the finished aircraft.

Performance is good with a 65hp VW. 112mph cruise, with 3200 revs, a speed of 125mph was attained. With flaps it lands at 45mph. These are the figures up to date. The aircraft is still being wrung out by a very well qualified test pilot.
Wow looks awesome. Did you build this from Plans? If so where are they available... AAK in Australia is building an all metal version but unsure if they have it flying yet.
Marc
 

jm.gray

Active Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2016
Messages
25
Location
New Zealand
Wow looks awesome. Did you build this from Plans? If so where are they available... AAK in Australia is building an all metal version but unsure if they have it flying yet.
Marc
Yes it was built from plans. Material used was Hemlock. A wood similar to spruce but a little heavier
The covering being 1mm spruce plywood.
The people to get in touch with and may help acquiring plans are Chilton DW1A & Flyers Group.

The metal Chilton is near completion but I believe unflown yet
 

Ava

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2022
Messages
70
Location
the rear cockpit
Last edited:

Chilton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2014
Messages
193
Location
Jersey, channel islands
Fourth from the top... 68 pages.
Yet another aeroplane one can use a Ford Model A engine in :) .
View attachment 127067
That is not a model A ford engine, it is the european Ford 10, a much smaller and lighter engine, the USA model A engine is heavier.

The pirated online plans at the site given are incomplete, and Roy Nerou who actualy redrew much of the original aircraft and supplies the plans has the permission of the original designers family, so please support him and do yourself a favour by contacting him for plans.
 

Ava

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2022
Messages
70
Location
the rear cockpit
That is not a model A ford engine, it is the european Ford 10, a much smaller and lighter engine, the USA model A engine is heavier.

The pirated online plans at the site given are incomplete, and Roy Nerou who actualy redrew much of the original aircraft and supplies the plans has the permission of the original designers family, so please support him and do yourself a favour by contacting him for plans.
The photo is of a Ford Model C engine, a Carden conversion. It has less displacement-- coming from both a smaller bore and shorter stroke than the Model A Ford-- but the block of a Carden Ford has the same basic dimensions and more importantly the same weight, 145 pounds, as a Ford A or B as converted per Bernard Pietenpol's plans. (Without the later counter-weighted cranks which are all heavier and vary in weight.) The C also puts out less power, 31 hp vs 38 hp for an A and maybe as much as 52 hp for a fully tricked out twin plug, aluminum head, counter-weighted B (which is of course even heavier than a C).

The 'Merikan Ford carries more oil in a deeper pan, so some jiggling of the the radiator, or maybe the thrustline would be required. But the Walther engine has a much higher thrustline, so that should be completely do-able.

This makes sense. Because the Brits, in their love of being eccentric, and after running out of words to add superfluous "u"s to, decided to tax engines based on cylinder capacity. So ole Henry just had his minions make the cylinders smaller while using as many common parts as possible. The bottom line is that an A can be made to fit and come in at about the same weight. Of course, in another lovable eccentricity, the carb and exhaust are on the "wrong" side 'cause they needed to clear the steering shaft which was likewise on the "wrong" side, to make it easier to drive on the "wrong" side of the road :) .

Please post a link or address for the "legit" plans.
We bought our Air Camper and Sky Scout plans from Andrew Pietenpol Aircraft Company – Official Pietenpol Air Camper | Wisconsin
Maybe a Chilton will be airplane #4 or #5... :)
 
Last edited:

Ava

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2022
Messages
70
Location
the rear cockpit
You may have missed it; see the link in post #72, above.
Which site seems to have been last updated ("what's new") in July 2011. The link to the discussion group takes me to Yahoo, where it says the page does not exist. Perhaps it is my browser, but the links to plan sheets pull up .tif files which I cannot open. Wikipedia says TIF is "tagged image format" the latest version of which (6.0) is 30 years old (1992).

Surfing a bit, TIF (or TIFF) was apparently a product of Adobe before they were Adobe (Aldus). Clicking on the "TIF help page" at Adobe renders an "error 404" message,
 
Last edited:
Top