Chemical Exposure Discussion

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Hephaestus

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Jun 25, 2014
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YMM
I've been wondering if Aluminum dust is a problem. Doing a lot of sanding lately. Any comments?
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Conversely, exposure to aluminium dust may possibly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia of the Alzheimer's type.
Yeah inhalation of anything is bad.
 

crkckr

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Apr 26, 2016
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Warrenton, MO
Workplace and even homes are subject to pollution from a list so long that would be hard to compile but we in the aircraft game might just be exposed to more than most. At the airline I worked for we used a lot of trichlorethylene III for cleaning parts and such but fortunately, it was in relatively small amounts (usually, anyway!). The kid that lived across the street from me was working at Northrup and they had a plating shop with an entire tub of the stuff, used to clean parts before plating. The sheet metal guys unfortunately found out the stuff is great for getting all the crud off your hands and arms. Since they were mainly young guys just starting families and such, there were 5 or 6 that had babies born with some pretty severe birth defects, which were traced back to the tub of trike. Horrible stuff when it comes to after effects on your body but there's little else that cleans like it did.

When it comes to products such as MMO having McNasties in it, the amount is so low that you'd just about have to bathe in the stuff... or maybe breath in the mist when using it to lube your air tools (kind of hard to hold your breath long enough, the stuff stays in the air for a long time, especially in the shop!). As has been said, there's nothing in the way of dusts or mists you can breath in that are good for you in the shop, so depending on how much and how often, the use of a vapor mask is highly recommended!
Cheers,
crkckr
 

PTAirco

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Corona CA
One routinely used protective thing in my workshop is barrier cream. I love the stuff. When doing fabric work, it's sometimes impossible to work with gloves (though I try to whenever I can). Supposedly it's pretty good at keeping ketones out of your skin. I reapply several times a day. The best side effect is that your hands clean up really fast no matter how grimy they get.

One Item of PPE I loathe and detest however is the bright yellow vest now mandatory at most European airfields. A solution in search of a problem. If they make me wear one of those things I'll print on the back: " Some idiot-bureaucrat made me wear this and I wear it under protest!"
 

wktaylor

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Sep 5, 2003
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Midwest USA
PTA... Lesson Learned...

Be careful about using barrier-cream, hand-cleaners, moisturizers, etc on hands... then handling parts. Always use plain nitrile gloves over bare hands coated with any of these... to avoid contamination of the parts by these creams/hand-cleaners/etc.

These creams/cleaners easily transfer-to-and-contaminate metals, plastics, fabrics, etc... causing bonding/finishing/sealing failures... and these contaminates may NOT be visually evident!

Regarding the bright colored safety jackets... can't help myself😜...
Evolution of PPE.jpg
 

Dana

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One Item of PPE I loathe and detest however is the bright yellow vest now mandatory at most European airfields.
A friend of mine was a controls engineer at Dynamite-Nobel. Everybody inside the plant was required to wear a bright orange T-shirt. This made it easier to find the bodies in the event of an explosion.

I once interviewed at a company that made solenoid valves. They took me on a tour of the plant, including the plating department. There were huge bins of sludge, the color just screamed, "TOXIC!" I'm sure it didn't glow in the dark but it looked like it should. I decided to not pursue that job, not only for that reason but it was a factor.
 

Pops

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A friend of mine was a controls engineer at Dynamite-Nobel. Everybody inside the plant was required to wear a bright orange T-shirt. This made it easier to find the bodies in the event of an explosion.

I once interviewed at a company that made solenoid valves. They took me on a tour of the plant, including the plating department. There were huge bins of sludge, the color just screamed, "TOXIC!" I'm sure it didn't glow in the dark but it looked like it should. I decided to not pursue that job, not only for that reason but it was a factor.
When I worked for Westinghouse Standard Control Division in Pittsburgh, Pa, they had a plating department , I stayed out of that dept. I worked running injection molding machines, that plastic smell was bad enough. At the time they made every little part they used. Lots of interesting departments. About 70% was gov contracts for the military. High security
 
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