Cassutt - looking for anyone who knows anything about it

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Little Scrapper

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Hey Ed

You mentioned the 4 lamination spar, my plans show 3. Did an update happen with the 17" wing?
 

BJC

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IIRC, from helping build a II wing long ago and far away, it went something like this:

Build the spar.
Level it, and mark the chord line on the front and back.
Fix it in place, with one face up, and stretch a tight wire along the chord line at the face of the rear spar.
Build the ribs.
Mark the chord lines on the ribs.
Glue the ribs in place.
Attach the rear spar.
Attach the leading edge blank.
Sand all together with a long, straight sand board.
Shape leading edge.
Install fittings.
Fit skin, and install guide pins for positioning it.
glue on the skin. (There are some tricks about moistening the skin to keel ot from developing a scallop between the ribs. I don't recall the details.)
Remove nails and guide pins.
Form and install a balsa tip.
Seal with epoxy, or cover with light weight fabric.
Paint it.
Get someone on the opposite wing tip, and lift it into position on the upper longerons.


BJC


BJC
 

Victor Bravo

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I've never flown a stock plans-built Cassutt. The one I had was Race #81, BooRay, and it was a race-only airplane. Everywhere it went, there was a trailer involved. When I bought it, it had a custom one-off aluminum race wing with 18 foot span and an aggressive NACA 66 series airfoil. I had a Grove Aircraft composite wing and tail built for it, which had a 20 foot span and a modified NACA 64-209 airfoil. Both of the configurations I flew it in scared the tar out of me, and I never considered it a sportplane by any means whatsoever. Also, I was an inexperienced pilot, with a severely inversely proportional ratio of brains to testosterone.

All that said, all the F-1 racer type people I knew who had flown the stock Cassutt said it was a sweetheart of an airplane on all counts. Far too sensitive for a trainer or low-time runabout... but a very honest and straightforward pocket rocket for a moderately experienced tailwheel pilot. I would not hesitate to fly a stock 15 foot span Cassutt IIIM as a sportplane today.
 

Little Scrapper

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Interesting, I'm looking at the wing drawings right now. I'll try to make sense of that using your description. I looked on the drawings I have and it shows no cord line or any indication whatsoever of a measurement. It does give the degree angles on the spar cross section so the rib contour is definitely not symmetrical. I guess I need to just make it look like the picture. haha.


IIRC, from helping build a II wing long ago and far away, it went something like this:

Build the spar.
Level it, and mark the chord line on the front and back.
Fix it in place, with one face up, and stretch a tight wire along the chord line at the face of the rear spar.
Build the ribs.
Mark the chord lines on the ribs.
Glue the ribs in place.
Attach the rear spar.
Attach the leading edge blank.
Sand all together with a long, straight sand board.
Shape leading edge.
Install fittings.
Fit skin, and install guide pins for positioning it.
glue on the skin. (There are some tricks about moistening the skin to keel ot from developing a scallop between the ribs. I don't recall the details.)
Remove nails and guide pins.
Form and install a balsa tip.
Seal with epoxy, or cover with light weight fabric.
Paint it.
Get someone on the opposite wing tip, and lift it into position on the upper longerons.


BJC


BJC
 

BJC

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Interesting, I'm looking at the wing drawings right now. I'll try to make sense of that using your description. I looked on the drawings I have and it shows no cord line or any indication whatsoever of a measurement. It does give the degree angles on the spar cross section so the rib contour is definitely not symmetrical. I guess I need to just make it look like the picture. haha.

Lots of photos here. Cassutt

The II M wing may have attached the ribs differently than the III M. Not sure.


BJC
 

Raceair

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The Spar on the 11M is a totally different animal. If you can imagine the laminated 111M spar from above, put two of them back to back….thats what the 11m looks like. Its done for torsion at the tip, as it is so thin it needs the spar tips separated from each other.
As far as I can recall back, the 4 lamination spar was not in any drawing form that I saw, just a modification of the 3 lam wing………Ed F.
 

TFF

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OK, you started with a bipe and shelved it for a 2 seater and now to a Cassutt. Im pointing the 'better finish finger' at you :) Why not just do it right and build a Knight Twister. I have always loved the little racer planes but I might have to go Midget Mustang. Prefer an Owl Racer or a Toni over the rest. The best story I know was a local private owned but public use airport was opened and they had a little airshow. One performer with a Cassutt did long low inverted pass down the 6000 ft. At the end he disappeared for a second and then he pulled out inverted. He had pulled on the stick instead of pushed, and almost drug the tail; oops. A friend has a neighbor with one but I have never seen it out.
 

Little Scrapper

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OK, you started with a bipe and shelved it for a 2 seater and now to a Cassutt. Im pointing the 'better finish finger' at you :) Why not just do it right and build a Knight Twister. I have always loved the little racer planes but I might have to go Midget Mustang. Prefer an Owl Racer or a Toni over the rest. The best story I know was a local private owned but public use airport was opened and they had a little airshow. One performer with a Cassutt did long low inverted pass down the 6000 ft. At the end he disappeared for a second and then he pulled out inverted. He had pulled on the stick instead of pushed, and almost drug the tail; oops. A friend has a neighbor with one but I have never seen it out.
Settle down TFF, settle down now! haha!

Life has a way of evolving and becoming unpredictable. The older I get the more unpredictable life becomes. The wigs for the Baby Lakes are done, well, about 90%. I didn't dare finish the ailerons without a fuselage because I found out I'm missing some prints. Aircraft Spruce is absolutely clueless, they just have the design rights. It's crazy trying to figure certain things out. But I survived and the wings look killer, it's like the best art I've ever looked at.

The business grew and I leased a new building, and that consumed a lot of time so the wings were wrapped and put in the mezzanine of a friends hangar. Some time passed and I found myself in a partnership with an airplane.....so the 2 seat airplane issue is solved. I learned a lesson here, never ever own a certified airplane from the 40's and never buy beat up Taylorcraft. Buy it done, it's cheaper.

Recently a buddy bought a Baby Lakes fuselage. It's not perfect but it's dam nice. He is begging me to sell him my wings. I'm tempted but I'm still not sold on the idea of giving them up, it's not the money, it's the time I have in them. It was ridiculous how many hours it took, like triple what I originally thought. Hard to let things like that go.

My kids are getting a bit older and airplanes just are not on the list for them, there's still hope for Oliver but time will tell.

But I've always liked the Cassutt, I've had plan sets for years and just kinda had it in the back of my head. I've always liked the Sonerai but I'm not real comfortable with the VW, I probably never will be.

I went to Oshkosh this year and talked with a fella who had a Cassutt. He loved it and after listening to him for an hour or so it really ignited my interest in the design again. It's a bummer the design has so little support, not that support is needed to build it but it sure would be nice. I think it's funny how a person never sees anything about the cassutt but as soon as you mention it people will quickly point out how great it was. The more I look at the plans the more I like it. Not sure what to think. I have room in my shop to build it and most of the material on hand besides the plywood skins and 1/2" capstrip. It's tempting.

The design has had a lot of crashes though, it has me concerned. I suspect most of them were pilot error? Not sure what to think about that.

Anyhow, at Airventure this year I didn't see any Cassutts and that's a shame, of course, every year there's less and less tube and fabric homebuilts so I suppose that's not much of a surprise.

Mike
 

TFF

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Sounds like life is good. You need his fuselage; I doubt I would give up the wings either. I think many times people are not ready to fly disciplined like a Cassutt needs; just not a plane to be all over with. Was it not last year, that Sport Aviation or Kitplanes that had the new owner and his plane? Might not be the same, but if he could develop one that he really fit in would at least generate some plans sales.
 

don january

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My father flew a fellow crop duster's Cassutt just east of aberdeen South Dakota and he said it was a blast to fly. Went to visit the fella in the hospital a few years back and he was busted up and the plane was even worse. Dont know any detail's just the fact that the plane was fast and fun. That's all I know about them other then some admireing thought's on flying them...cassutt.jpg
 

Little Scrapper

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Guys, if you're on Facebook you can follow his updates. Search "outlaw air racing". He's a really neat guy and he's got some good photos and videos.

I would love to see more photos of other Cassutts if you guys have any.
 

Raceair

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There are tons of Cassutt pictures available by just using Google and typing in 'Cassutt Racer'…….
Creighton King (previous Cassutt business owner) and I were talking about how many were possibly built over the years, and we estimate over 800 'cassutts' (lumping all models) have been built and flown. I bet there are hundreds that are still out there partially built, in storage, waiting for new owners……A little detective work could turn up a project quickly, for a reasonable price…
When we originally finished N2EF, we had an A-80 continental on it. It weighed about 515 empty, and would cruise easily at 165 with that engine. Dad flew it out of a 2200 ft. grass strip, with trees and wires on both ends. When I rebuilt it, I installed an 0-200 Cont, and cleaned up the gear, pants, etc, and it 'cruised' at 180…although it was now at 540 pounds empty….....Ed
 

Little Scrapper

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There are tons of Cassutt pictures available by just using Google and typing in 'Cassutt Racer'…….
Creighton King (previous Cassutt business owner) and I were talking about how many were possibly built over the years, and we estimate over 800 'cassutts' (lumping all models) have been built and flown. I bet there are hundreds that are still out there partially built, in storage, waiting for new owners……A little detective work could turn up a project quickly, for a reasonable price…
When we originally finished N2EF, we had an A-80 continental on it. It weighed about 515 empty, and would cruise easily at 165 with that engine. Dad flew it out of a 2200 ft. grass strip, with trees and wires on both ends. When I rebuilt it, I installed an 0-200 Cont, and cleaned up the gear, pants, etc, and it 'cruised' at 180…although it was now at 540 pounds empty….....Ed
That's amazing performance on a small engine.
 
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