Carbon Fiber Tube Fuselage

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Aviator168

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Because for sub 200mph air loads it is much more delicate, than needed to survive hangar rush/ mooron pencil attack/ waiting in the corner in sub-asembles bin.

ch-701/750 are build from thicker skin, than needed - and after heavy usage it is full of small dent.

On the other hand - Cri-cri have foam ribs spaces each ~ 50mm. And wings are always hidden then not in use..
Then why not just use a carbon shell.
 

TLAR

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My original intent was to use PVC foam to construct four frames, top bottom and two sides. I have never intended to use off the shelf CF tube. You will never be able to attach them in a cluster.
If you use foam you can route the foam to accept the fiber. Think of the foam as a plug if you will.
Once the four frames have been reinforced with CF, you can then join the frames at the longerons and reinforce.
You will end up with a traditional looking tube fuselage that is safe to use.
the foam will also assist with compression buckling.
YMMV if you don’t have a clue what your doing, and may I suggest you use a different material in construction of your fuselage.
So to be clear my method of construction uses PVC foam in the shape of a tube fuselage, reinforced by CF.
This method allows for a fiber path across all the joints
 

speedracer

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I'm curious as to why you wouldn't be able to attach store bought C/F tubes in a cluster.
 

raymondbird

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What about all the carbon fiber tube bicycles? Better, stronger, faster and lighter than steel of course. Can't we study how they join their tubes? It's all over the internet. What am I missing?
 

stanislavz

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Better, stronger, faster and lighter than steel of course. Can't we study how they join their tubes? It's all over the internet. What am I missing?
They are done in series. And they can provided consistent environment to ensure high quality. And - they are stronger in "bicycle loads" but are very unforgiving on any impacts/abuse.

If you want to make it from Cf- where is not simpler way, than showed by BoKu - single skin + PE foam strips to make tube a like structure in situ..
 

stanislavz

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What if the tubes and gussets are made of quasi-unidirectional layers?
When you loose all CF weight economy - if you do not taper cf fiber to take highest loads, it is just not worth it.. Go for steel instead..
 

4redwings

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CF is without question the highest performance material we have where high heat exposure is not an issue. It is used in virtually all high performance, competition applications. Formula 1, Reno F-1, Sport and Biplane classes, B777, etc, etc. So l'd probably look to them for design and construction guidance. Typically molds and plugs. Monocoque. You don't usually see tubes and connectors but I know there are guys trying. I personally applaud anyone experimenting with something new. Most "experimental" aviation actually isn't, but it is what excites me most.
 

Hephaestus

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Posted that 4 axis xwinder video yesterday - I wonder if you could wrap tubes to spec with built in connectors?
 

TLAR

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I watched a portion of the video. You can clearly see that it gets very technical very fast just to build a simple bicycle frame. Almost all uni prepeg. That bicycle is gonna cost some serious money.
I will venture to say very few home builders would be able to pull off a carbon tube fuselage
 
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