Can I paint a composite plaine a silver / grey color?

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choppergirl

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If I were to pick colors dictated by that color curve heat absorbtion chart, my airplane would end up looking like this... because I'm deadset against "Cub Yellow", and "Lightblue Sky"... which leaves me "Pink" and "Purple" low on the chart

Huge BOOM Color Scheme 3 Pink 9.jpg - big tail mockup H.jpg

High visibility wow yeah baby, but could I live with it versus Coca Cola Classic Colors.

You could pick out my Cotton Candy Colored airplane parked on the ground at Oshkosh from the air.... probably even from outer space. Can you imagine that flying by a United States prison giving them a free slow airshow, or landing on the Whitehouse Lawn?

main-qimg-d5e10e8250b0549548cd195f4aef6e75-c.jpg

Even the Red Baron would be like Heiliger Mist auf einem Cracker, bright ostentacious airplane, they must be one bad mofo to put out a calling card like that, vielleicht werde ich das überspringen.

The more I look at it, the more it grows on me like an air show eye magnet... :-/ All the girls and kids are walking past your 100,000 hour restored Flying Fortress to hang around my plane and get some free Cotton Candy from my ebay direct from Schenzen machine... sugar and food coloring is dirt cheap...

Members of Choppergirl's Flying Circus Cosplay Troupe walk around the show handing out purple and pink samples on a stick. Simple color association.

I can't beat Kermit Weeks in $$$, but I can out guerilla market his a$$ with the Plebs.... nothing draws a crowd like a crowd.

Invest now on the ground floor before I own the world :)

Aesquire: air flow across my metal heat sinks by little fans work just great as a cooling technique; you may want to check your physics. Heat sinks without air flow get finger burning hot to the touch, acting like a solid block of metal heat capacitor; add a tiny fan blowing through them and within a minute they are cool as a cucumber. :)
 
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Aesquire

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Choppergirl,

Heat can move by conduction, convection, radiation, and jazz music. ;)

The trouble is a fiberglass wing isn't a metal heat sink. The conduction of the plastic is much lower. So even when airflow ( convection ) over the surface cools it a bit, it doesn't cool the inside very fast at all.

The upside of that is it also takes time to heat soak a fiberglass structure. But parked in the sun all day does qualify.

Another thing to consider is that different materials deal with heat differently.
Your fabric covered plane isn't as heat resistant as a RV-x but is better than a Lancair.

It's wrong to say that composite planes are the only ones that have to worry about overheating in the sun, but I don't see Airbus panicking if they can't pull an A-380 into a hanger right after landing.

UV damage is a different matter.

So, While Coca-cola Red is a hot color, I don't see it as a problem on your bird. But I'm also fine with pink and purple. Colors to avoid are the ones that make you invisible, like sky blue, haze grey and the like.
 

BJC

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air flow across my metal heat sinks by little fans work just great as a cooling technique; you may want to check your physics. Heat sinks without air flow get finger burning hot to the touch, acting like a solid block of metal heat capacitor; add a tiny fan blowing through them and within a minute they are cool as a cucumber. :) [/I]
You do appreciate the effect of turbulent flow verses laminar flow on heat transfer, don't you? And the application of Reynolds number to the local flow as an indicator of its characteristics? Interesting stuff, thermo and aero. Glad that you are digging into the subjects.


BJC
 

choppergirl

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So, While Coca-cola Red is a hot color, I don't see it as a problem on your bird. But I'm also fine with pink and purple. Colors to avoid are the ones that make you invisible, like sky blue, haze grey and the like.
I think my plane might become an industry standard test. When my plane is invisible to you, it's time for you to retire from flying...



All because Zeitlen posted a color chart... let's rock some bubble gum. Maybe I owe him a pack.
 

Aesquire

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I can't find the photos online but Wings magazine had an article on the history of aircraft camouflage that showed the pink & purple swirls on a couple of U.S. Navy test planes. A TBD and a Buffalo IIRC.

You'd love them.

The idea was to confuse the eye as to the direction the plane was moving, a vital aspect of current camouflage which is usually four broad diagonal irregular stripes in shades of gray blue. But the modern stuff also is meant to hide the outline of the plane since one of the stripes should match the background more or less.

Various schemes were tried on these 1930's planes. Some quite striking like "eyes" on butterflies. In the end while the directional confusion worked, it made the planes more visible against the ground while in flight.

That research led to the much simpler ( but still cursed by model builders ) 3 tone Navy scheme that used light color on the bottom/ shadow side to try and reduce the contrast against sky or ground.

Also, not aircraft related, Syrian Army elite units use purple camouflage. In dim lighting it's as good as any color and even in daylight it's better than green Vietnam era camouflage in the terrain of the region which trend to muddy, sand, and rock colors, with little green much less triple canopy jungle.
 

Aesquire

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BJC

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Some surface temps of airplanes at Oshkosh, all in F:

Cozy. White 98. Dark purple 138.

Glasair. Wing-White 105. Dark gray 134. Fuselage side 108 and 138.

Glasair tail. White 103. Orange 117. Yellow 112. Red 123.

Midget Mustang. Wing, silver paint 104. Fuselage, dark paint 134.

I do not consider any of these to be calibrated, but I suspect that the spreads between the readings are reasonably accurate.


BJC
 

BBerson

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I think it was all grass parking in showplane area in front of HBA meeting table. Almost everything else is grass except a heavy.
 

BJC

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BB is correct: they were parked on dry grass in the afternoon sun. All were within a few hundref fert of each other.


BJC
 

BJC

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Info relevant to the recent thread on paint color verses temperature.


BJC

Some surface temps of airplanes at Oshkosh, all in F:

Cozy. White 98. Dark purple 138.

Glasair. Wing-White 105. Dark gray 134. Fuselage side 108 and 138.

Glasair tail. White 103. Orange 117. Yellow 112. Red 123.

Midget Mustang. Wing, silver paint 104. Fuselage, dark paint 134.

I do not consider any of these to be calibrated, but I suspect that the spreads between the readings are reasonably accurate.


BJC
BB is correct: they were parked on dry grass in the afternoon sun. All were within a few hundref fert of each other.


BJC
 
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