Can anyone shed light on this little shrimp?

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Tiger Tim

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Please tell me that it's not meant to be man-carrying?
I really wish I could find my info on it but yes, it was a manned airplane. A small man, I'm sure.

TS100 would wet himself with delight that such a tiny plane actually exists then flood us with six million concepts of similar planes. Some days I kind of wish he had his own forum that I could lurk on.
 

Chris.r.Ingram

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Built in the early sixties sounds right. It was around that time that the small biplanes were becoming popular as air racers. The knight twisters were phenomenal but when the eaa got involved they changed the rules and requirements for the biplanes, essentially making the eaa biplane the de facto size and eliminated the smaller faster biplanes from even competing.
 

BJC

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when the eaa got involved they changed the rules and requirements for the biplanes, essentially making the eaa biplane the de facto size and eliminated the smaller faster biplanes from even competing.
The Pitts S-1 has less wing area than the EAA Biplane, and is a popular biplane racer at Reno.

Rules here: Reno Air Racing Classes and Rules Note that the EAA Biplane wing area is close to 108 square feet, much larger than the minimum.


BJC
 

Chris.r.Ingram

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The Pitts S-1 has less wing area than the EAA Biplane, and is a popular biplane racer at Reno.

Rules here: Reno Air Racing Classes and Rules Note that the EAA Biplane wing area is close to 108 square feet, much larger than the minimum.


BJC
The point being that knight twisters and the like were eliminated from competition.
knight twister wing is 60 sq. Ft and they moved the limit to 75.
 

BJC

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The point being that knight twisters and the like were eliminated from competition.
knight twister wing is 60 sq. Ft and they moved the limit to 75.

The knight twisters were phenomenal but when the eaa got involved they changed the rules and requirements for the biplanes, essentially making the eaa biplane the de facto size and eliminated the smaller faster biplanes from even competing.

OK, but why did you blame it on the EAA and the EAA Biplane? Is there some documented history?


BJC
 

BJC

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When I was flying a Pitts regularly, I flew a close-in pattern, remained at pattern altitude under reduced power until turning onto a very short final at about 90 MPH, reduced power to idle, and slipped, steeply, down to the runway.

I practiced the impossible turn, but a more likely scenario was a slip back to the runway straight ahead. Turning back took lots of altitude, even after climbing at faster than Vx. Depending on the prop, a Pitts can have a fairly steep climb. The glide is equally steep, but better with a fixed pitch (which is a floater, compared to a CS) than the S-2X with a constant speed.

BJC
 

pylon500

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I saw this thing in '13 as well, and determined that it is what I call a 'penguin' plane.
Almost a real aeroplane, but not really intended for flight, maybe just tail wheel ground practice.
Loved the little radial, but if that was the standard prop for it, then it was very powerful (or useful).
Tessier.png
 

Yellowhammer

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Yellowhammer

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Swept wing for the Liberty Sport and it is a one off. Borrowed from the biplane forum.

I have flown both the Liberty Sport and the Liberty Model B. Both airplanes were built using fuselages, horizontal stabilizers and elevators, and control sticks from an Aeronca Champ 7AC. The vertical stabilizer and rudder are from Piper Pacers. The landing gears are from Cessna 140/170. The Liberty Sport had parts from 17 different aircraft. The wings are originals designed by Liberty Lloyd and built by his brother, Orville.They have aluminum ribsusing the M6 airfoil, mounted on wood spars.The Liberty Sport was flown in the early 1960's, powered by a 150HP Lycoming FWF from a Pacer. The Model B had a 190HP Lycoming 0-490. I made the initial test flight on the Model B on July 12, 1989, and flew off the first 12 hours. In late November 1998 I delivered the Sport to its new owner, Ralph Belden, in Yarrington, Nevada. Although the Sport was a very nice airplane, I really enjoyed the Model B. It soloed from the rear rather than the front as in the Sport. It had a sliding canopy over the rear only. It was such a treat to fly. I had been flying my Pitts, so the first landing in the B I nearly overshot the airport as the B would actually glide like an airplane rather than a streamlined crowbar. Although not designed for aerobatics, I did basic maneuvers in both airplanes. The B is owned by Roger Lloyd, and is in Arizona. Plans were never made available for either design. The Lloyds are personal friends, and are now well into their 90's. Great people, great airplanes. I'd love to fly the B again someday.


Your reply is the very reason I am proud to be a member of this forum. That is about as much light as anyone can shed on a subject sir and I salute you. I learned much!

-Yellowhammer
 
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This little girl hung in the EAA museum in Hales Corners for almost two decades, but she wasn't glitzy enough for the new museum, so was hung in one of the maintenance hangars along the North side of the airport. She is now sitting on her gear on the floor, receiving some some much needed attention in the back of the main maintenance hangar, looking like a mascot for the Ford Trimotor.
There was a second one built with a Salmson 9 cylinder radial (45hp), called a Bobcat, but I don't know whatever came of her.
 
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