California Bans Small Off-Road Gas Engines, Including Lawnmowers and Chainsaws

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Pilot-34

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Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
You see for me I’ve been an early adopter of a lot of battery powered electric technologies.
I think that’s how electric powered stuff will actually be successful.
In the end it seems to me like most people are willing to breathe the most foul aair to have something a little bit more convenient. That’s why I bought a new Milwaukee battery powered impact the first year it came out.
The reason I’m interested in battery powered lawnmowers is because I believe a zero turn mower is easily converted to a tracked off-road vehicle. The quietness of it has several pay offs.
The obvious pay off is its quieter stalking machine should make it easier to come in to contact with game. But I think another payoff is a fact that the whole world doesn’t listen to you is not bothered by you I cannot hear you or know where you’re at.
And for its primary use which is going to be prospecting not being able to be easily trackedby sound is a positive thing.

I think the audio signature On lots of things like snowmobile’s motorcycles etc. has far more impact on their desirability or dislike than their actual operation.

Really I don’t care if they run on raw plutonium I think quietness will be there selling feature
 

Daleandee

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I wasn’t parading the righteousness honestly I don’t care about the righteousness I do care about what it can do for me there was no reason for you to drag me into your dirty argument
Seems only fair as you seemed to be trying to drag me into Alaska. ;) No harm or foul intended!

Dragging me into Alaska wouldn't be hard to do as I've always wanted to see the place for myself. It appears to be a stunningly beautiful and very peaceful place. Not sure I could deal with the cold and the times when it never really gets dark.
 

Pilot-34

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Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
Seems only fair as you seemed to be trying to drag me into Alaska. ;) No harm or foul intended!

Dragging me into Alaska wouldn't be hard to do as I've always wanted to see the place for myself. It appears to be a stunningly beautiful and very peaceful place. Not sure I could deal with the cold and the times when it never really gets dark.
Lol talk about the ultimate sidetrack there a few of us here that will talk about Alaska all day long.
And that can be a long day up there!

I’ve always thought it was funny that Alaska is famous for its winter yet most people visit it in in the summer!
Strange thing I have found winters in Illinois to be far worse than winters in Alaska in Illinois they come they go they barely qualify as a little bit of snow so they’re wet and they’re windy and then muddy and they’re awfull.
In a lot of Alaska they’re cold enough that everything stays frozen it doesn’t melt and run into your shoes it doesn’t leave your feet muddy.
Since it’s going to be that way and you know it you dress for it and it’s not a problem!
 

TFF

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Memphis, TN
I’m glad I went in the winter time. Winter sunlight is pretty precious. Sunrise at 10 AM is very strange. Everyone seems to stop and watch it go up like it’s a new thing. Down at 4. Most people are not able to take extended vacations in the winter. That and summer is hunting and fishing. Everything is hibernating in the winter. If you can fly, the scenery is awesome. If you are hoofing it, it’s still awesome but you are preoccupied and you really can’t go very far. I was surprised how little air tourism there is where 99% of tourists only want to see stuff.

Alaska is a strange place. You might be born there and it’s home. You might want to test your self against the land, which is the romantic side. If you want to play there but live a fairly normal lower 48 life, it’s going to cost. It’s expensive. Civilization only has so many square miles so it’s more like Manhattan. The state is more like an island because everything there is imported. I would say more kin to Australia with reverse weather.
 

Appowner

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Did a tour in Fairbanks for 18 months back in 75-77. Saw absolutely too flippin' far below zero (-69 IIRC) and way too much snow (120") even for this winter loving Michigander.

But the beauty of the place is beyond anything you'll find anywhere else. Daylight from 10-2 you can get use to. It's the 1AM to 11PM days that I found rough. And the VW bug that gets 3 MPG at 40 below is a novelty to be experienced. Clearing that little rise in the trail on a dirt bike only to find a moose blocking things on the other side. Laid the bike down and watched it slide under the moose who then casually walked away.

Then there's the ice fog. After a day of launching tankers their exhaust freezes and hangs in the air as a fog. It gets to the point where you can't see your hand in front of your face. And if you don't know your way around the base, you could easily get lost 10-15 feet from a door.

Let us not forget the Northern Lights. Filling 50 plus percent of the night sky. And dancing like living room drapes waving in the breeze. Makes for an easy date with a full tank of gas.

Last but not least are the Ravens. Big, ugly, black, birds sitting on top of utility poles watching the world go by. At 60 below zero.

I kept trying to go back but Uncle Sams airline had other ideas for me.
 

Rhino

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Did a tour in Fairbanks for 18 months back in 75-77...
Eielson! Went TDY there twice on a plane called Cobra Ball. Funny thing. We left Omaha on one trip where it was 5 degrees, got off the plane at Eielson where it was 25 below, and actually felt more comfortable there. We attributed it to higher humidity and the constant wind in Omaha, where the weathermen described 40 MPH as 'breezy'. We had several crewmembers who'd done tours there and absolutely could not wait to go back. That was all about 20 years after your stint there though.
 

Appowner

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Eielson! Went TDY there twice on a plane called Cobra Ball. Funny thing. We left Omaha on one trip where it was 5 degrees, got off the plane at Eielson where it was 25 below, and actually felt more comfortable there. We attributed it to higher humidity and the constant wind in Omaha, where the weathermen described 40 MPH as 'breezy'. We had several crewmembers who'd done tours there and absolutely could not wait to go back. That was all about 20 years after your stint there though.
Ha! Ha! I remember those. I had a fight (not flight) with one one day. I won but they'll never admit it.

The tops of my ears got nipped (frost bit) one day when after a week or more at 40 below and colder, it jumped up to 20 below and felt like spring. Stupid me wore a ball cap for the 200 yards to the base theater. Man did that hurt when my ears thawed.
 
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Pops

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Did a tour in Fairbanks for 18 months back in 75-77. Saw absolutely too flippin' far below zero (-69 IIRC) and way too much snow (120") even for this winter loving Michigander.

But the beauty of the place is beyond anything you'll find anywhere else. Daylight from 10-2 you can get use to. It's the 1AM to 11PM days that I found rough. And the VW bug that gets 3 MPG at 40 below is a novelty to be experienced. Clearing that little rise in the trail on a dirt bike only to find a moose blocking things on the other side. Laid the bike down and watched it slide under the moose who then casually walked away.

Then there's the ice fog. After a day of launching tankers their exhaust freezes and hangs in the air as a fog. It gets to the point where you can't see your hand in front of your face. And if you don't know your way around the base, you could easily get lost 10-15 feet from a door.

Let us not forget the Northern Lights. Filling 50 plus percent of the night sky. And dancing like living room drapes waving in the breeze. Makes for an easy date with a full tank of gas.

Last but not least are the Ravens. Big, ugly, black, birds sitting on top of utility poles watching the world go by. At 60 below zero.

I kept trying to go back but Uncle Sams airline had other ideas for me.
Where I was living in 1992, we got 180" of snow that winter. Grid power was off for a week with 4' of snow and winds up to 60 mph. Still not as bad as in 1950 when we were snowed in for about 3 weeks with high winds and 50" of snow made 20' snow drifts.
 

Appowner

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Where I was living in 1992, we got 180" of snow that winter. Grid power was off for a week with 4' of snow and winds up to 60 mph. Still not as bad as in 1950 when we were snowed in for about 3 weeks with high winds and 50" of snow made 20' snow drifts.
Yep! We had periods where spouses of military members would stay in the house for months at a time. Cabin Fever ran many marriages into the ground. A girl I grew up with in Michigan didn't last her first winter. And she was at Elmendorf.

I was there when the pipeline was going in. My supervisor had a 21 foot motor home. Four pipeline workers offered him $800 a month EACH to live in that motor home. He turned them down. The wife of another friend got a job with the pipe line as a secretary. 45k/yr in 1975-76.

Cross Country Ski to the Rod and Gun club. About 2.5 miles. Check first with the Tower first to see if they've seen any wolves on base that night.

Ten miles off base responding to a VOR outage I parked the truck the requisite 100 yards form the VOR. On opening the truck door the light shone onto about 5 nches of fresh snow. And the biggest flippin wolf print I've ever seen. After that we received permission to carry personal side arms in government vehicles. Never saw another wolf track but my supervisor did drop a Moose with a rifle one day. 50 yard shot! Go figure.

Then there was the day I watched as the phone shop started to move one of their trucks. Don't recall the temp but it was probably around 20 below. Anyway it was cold enough to compress the truck body enough that when it hit a pot hole in the parking lot the entire windshield popped out of the frame. I can still see it just sort of hanging there over the hood before it came crashing down.

The place is hard on vehicles. You had to put tubes in your tubless tires so when the temp dropped suddenly, you wouldn't lose the bead of the tire and could limp to an air hose. I personally blew one clutch and 18 U-Joints in my 18 month stretch. Once at the afore mentioned VOR I stepped out of the VOR at around 5 AM only to see the main drive shaft of the truck with one end down in the snow. $#%&
 

Pops

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Yep! We had periods where spouses of military members would stay in the house for months at a time. Cabin Fever ran many marriages into the ground. A girl I grew up with in Michigan didn't last her first winter. And she was at Elmendorf.

I was there when the pipeline was going in. My supervisor had a 21 foot motor home. Four pipeline workers offered him $800 a month EACH to live in that motor home. He turned them down. The wife of another friend got a job with the pipe line as a secretary. 45k/yr in 1975-76.

Cross Country Ski to the Rod and Gun club. About 2.5 miles. Check first with the Tower first to see if they've seen any wolves on base that night.

Ten miles off base responding to a VOR outage I parked the truck the requisite 100 yards form the VOR. On opening the truck door the light shone onto about 5 nches of fresh snow. And the biggest flippin wolf print I've ever seen. After that we received permission to carry personal side arms in government vehicles. Never saw another wolf track but my supervisor did drop a Moose with a rifle one day. 50 yard shot! Go figure.

Then there was the day I watched as the phone shop started to move one of their trucks. Don't recall the temp but it was probably around 20 below. Anyway it was cold enough to compress the truck body enough that when it hit a pot hole in the parking lot the entire windshield popped out of the frame. I can still see it just sort of hanging there over the hood before it came crashing down.

The place is hard on vehicles. You had to put tubes in your tubless tires so when the temp dropped suddenly, you wouldn't lose the bead of the tire and could limp to an air hose. I personally blew one clutch and 18 U-Joints in my 18 month stretch. Once at the afore mentioned VOR I stepped out of the VOR at around 5 AM only to see the main drive shaft of the truck with one end down in the snow. $#%&
Old friend Dallas and I were ask to go on the Alaskan pipe line at that time but I had 3 young children and also was making about the same money , so didn't go.
 

Appowner

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And people ask why I live in the deep South...
Well having logged six plus years between Texas, Alabama and Mississippi. I'll take Alaska. Though I will admit I'm not as tolerant of the cold as I use to be.
 
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