Building my Own Hangar - Do you have any recommendations?

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by Aircraft Artist, May 2, 2017.

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  1. May 3, 2017 #21

    Rockiedog2

    Rockiedog2

    Rockiedog2

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    I built 2 myself and then had a 3rd built by one of the pole building companies. There's no comparison in the quality; the pole building is hands down the best building. And it was cheaper than I could have built it with my own two hands. The crew of 4 showed up and started at 9am and was finished and loaded up at 330 the next afternoon. 15 hours total hands on time. All I had to do was write a check. Of yeh I did build the doors. I'm much more pleased wit the professionally built hangar and wish I had done all three that way. Knowing what I know now the pole building is the only way I would go.
     
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  2. May 3, 2017 #22

    stuart fields

    stuart fields

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    I built my own house/hangar. I started with a 40x72 Grain Barn and put a basement under the first 24 feet and kept a 40x48 shop. This was done in 1972. With 6" stud walls inside of the girts, I have walls that are about 1' thick with extra insulation. That was enough for a while but recently added a 24x72 section to give a 64x72 structure. Of that only 24x24 became a new small shop. We did all the erection and sprayed closed cell foam. Will hire that done if ever again. I have a 30' wide door that is 14' high. I've had a Bell 47 and my smaller two seat experimental helo in it for awhile. The 30' door width works for the helicopter. The maintenance on this metal building has been essentially zero. The exterior looks just like a grain barn with some windows. The shop is unheated and un cooled. I do have some diesel fired heating and a fan for cooler. We also have 7kw of grid tied solar. So our electric bill isn't too high. We now have heat pumps so there is no open flame utility in the building.
    Stuart Fields
     
  3. May 3, 2017 #23

    BBerson

    BBerson

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    Wood frame with metal siding is cheapest and heats better if insulated.
    Building is easy. Dealing with airport authorities is not.
     
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  4. May 3, 2017 #24

    Pops

    Pops

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    I have a 48' x 60' metal truss with wood purlins and girts with a 44' x 12 bi-fold door and a garage door on the side. Heated and AC with a office, paint booth. Built on the other side of my driveway from my house. The hanger is on solar except for the 220 volt equipment. Getting ready to install more solar panels to take care of the 220 V, have the new inverter installed.
    My daughter has 50' x 60' with a 50'x 16' apartment on the end with a 44'x 12' bi-fold door and a 16' garage door on the side. Apartment has the 6'' hanger walls + the 4" apartment walls.
     
  5. May 3, 2017 #25

    Aircraft Artist

    Aircraft Artist

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    Bid came back...about $6,000 for the door and $5,000 for the free-standing frame!! Man that' adds up!! :ermm:
     
  6. May 3, 2017 #26

    Aircraft Artist

    Aircraft Artist

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    Do you know what company he bought his from?
     
  7. May 3, 2017 #27

    Aircraft Artist

    Aircraft Artist

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    Good gravy you got one heck of a setup. Unfortunately the closest Menards is 841 miles away. :(
     
  8. May 3, 2017 #28

    akwrencher

    akwrencher

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    Not off hand. Could probably find out, but it was over ten years ago. I'm sure it was the cheeper he could find at the time. A reputable company that has been around would probably be fine. I ended up building the doors for it. Six bay t hangers, 14' tall by 40' doors, steel frame with hydraulic rams. Used new surplus balanced rams. Work pretty good. Wouldn't win a beauty pageant though. Learned alot from that project. First and foremost, make sure whatever you get, no matter the type of building, be sure it is designed to be insulated. It's a pain to go back and deal with all the details when it wasn't planned for in the beginning.
     
  9. May 3, 2017 #29

    akwrencher

    akwrencher

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    Just for kicks, here's a pic of one of the doors. It works, but there are easier ways to skin a cat than the way we did it.
     

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  10. May 3, 2017 #30

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Ready-made roof prefabricated wood roof trusses up to 40' long are not hard to find and I saw some online at Menard's (just as an example) for less than $300 each. Six of those on 8' centers would give you 40' x 40'. I can't imagine that a simple post-and-beam skeleton with wood or steel rod X-bracing in each bay, external diagonal steel braces to the ground on either side of the door, vertical board siding, galvanized roofing and ordinary rolling barn doors in 4' sections would run more than $10,000 for the building itself. Maybe you need to reach out to some local contractors that do farm buildings and ask for a price for a barn with a 40' clear span and not mention airplane hangar at all. I have also seen some farm building using traditional pole or post wood construction except for a steel roof truss, which is another option.
     
  11. May 3, 2017 #31

    Mcmark

    Mcmark

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    Be careful using pre-manufactured trusses without checking load ratings. Generally they are max spaced at 2' centers.
    Finding a truss manufacturer locally is not that difficult and they have their own engineers that will design for your application. My shop/hangar was done this way. Been thru hurricanes and 3' snow loads.
     
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  12. May 3, 2017 #32

    ToddK

    ToddK

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    I work out of a pole barn. Not a hanger, but I would certainly do another one. Super fast, inexpensive seems strong. Make sure in writing that the posts are treated to .60 or greater. We also used PLASTI-SLEEVE post protectors. Do yourself a favor and get the blanket insulation, be on sight and make sure they don't pull it to tight. You want it to puff out to get the r value.

    If and when I get to build a hanger, I will certainly look at the Ultimate Door.

    http://ultimatedoor.homestead.com/ultimate.html
     

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