Building my Own Hangar - Do you have any recommendations?

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by Aircraft Artist, May 2, 2017.

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  1. May 2, 2017 #1

    Aircraft Artist

    Aircraft Artist

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    Does anyone recommend a type of hangar to build? Does anyone recommend building a hangar or should I just contract that out?

    DIY:
    Quonset Huts are easy to put up and cheap, but the style clashes with my house. I was thinking of making a hangar with Versatube (www.versatube.com), but I have not seen a Versatube hangar nor of anyone contemplating using them as a hangar (you would have to customize the building as they only allow 18' wide doors, standard).

    Contracting Out:
    I was thinking of just hiring either a pole barn builder or a steel company to erect a hangar for me, but not sure which one to choose.

    I'm going for a 40'x40'x10' size hangar with a Schweiss bi-fold door. Would like it to be easily insulated.

    I'm open to any suggestions. Looking for something where I can get a decent sq ft/$.
     
  2. May 2, 2017 #2

    TFF

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    When compared to the Veratube structure, a Schweiss door is going to be sicker shock. I dont think a Versatube will be strong enough to handle one anyway. Building codes will probably chose the hanger for you.
     
  3. May 2, 2017 #3

    akwrencher

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    What's wrong with standard stick frame construction? Would need trusses for the roof and possibly some glue lam beams, but it's not rocket science. As previously stated though, check local building codes first.

    Easy to insulate. I insulated a steel hanger not long ago. Had to learn to spray closed cell foam. Expensive and messy. IMHO, stick frame is fast and efficient and easy to insulate. Also easy to attach things like lights and stuff. Don't have to weld brackets everywhere.
     
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  4. May 2, 2017 #4

    Hephaestus

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    Pole barn.

    Most good ag building companies will have a few hangar options... Around here they can make them match houses pretty nicely.
     
  5. May 2, 2017 #5

    mcrae0104

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    ^THIS.

    Oftentimes people mistakenly assume that there is no building code because they live in unincorporated areas but there may be state laws that govern your situation, as well as county- or locally-adopted codes. Check out section section 412 of the International Building Code (specifically section 412.5, Residential Aircraft Hangars--assuming your jurisdiction has adopted the IBC and that you meet the definition below from IBC Chapter 2).

    Interestingly, the IBC does not appear to have any fire-resistance requirements for residential aircraft hangars (compare to the requirements for other hangars) but it may be wise to consider the flammability of both the structure and any insulation added to it, particularly if it is near your home.
     
  6. May 2, 2017 #6

    DangerZone

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    If it snows in your area, it might be wise to calculate how much your hangar roof needs to withstand. Some people neglect the fact that snow is heavy and realize this too late. This might rule out hangars based on Quonset Huts without some additional support.

    http://infotel.ca/news/medialibrary/image/orig-mediaitemid39649-7771.jpg

    If going for a straight or slightly canted roof, sandwich panels offer good insulation and structural integrity properties. These are very light, flame retardant, UV protective, soundproof, moisture resistant and offer great structural strength. A 200 lbs person can easily walk on top of this kind of roof and it can withstand up to 3 meters of snow (10 feet of snow). One can also choose between mineral wool or EPS foam as the insulation material, depending on wishes and need.

    krovnih-sendvic-panela-DEX2.jpg

    Such panels can also be used for the sides and doors. It might not be as cheap as some other solutions, but it could probably better protect an aircraft than other (cheaper) solutions. Just a thought.

    NW-2.JPG
     
  7. May 2, 2017 #7

    kent Ashton

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    Check out this door. It's a balanced door that doesn't need to bolt to a lot of hangar structure for support. It could probably be used with a pole-building.
    hpdoors.com
     
  8. May 2, 2017 #8

    Mcmark

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    In a past life (read before divorce), I was a dealer for a post frame construction product. My hangar total to date is 5 with 3 bi-fold doors (1 Hi-Fold and 2 Schweiss), 1 Hydraulic (Schweiss) and 1 Cool-Air Kit Door and 1 Homemade track door.
    Post Frame is an excellent choice for this application and most companies will design for ALL loads, wind, snow, live as well as design the structure to accept the door.
    You can pick and choose options and end up with a Chevy or the Cadillac.
    The Schweiss Door people are excellent to deal with and their product is first class. That said you will expend a large sum to get it. Then have to spend more to hang it.
    Cool-Air is a good cost effective option, it does in most cases take up a small amount of the opening, but you can design around this.
    Stick framed can also be a winner, if you are or have carpentry experience. Post frame can be done by the owner, but with little or no experience the learning curve can be steep.
    I'd suggest contacting at least 3 contractors and get competing apples to apples bids and see where you end up.
    Good luck with your endeavor.
    Mark

    Just watched the hpdoors.com vid's. Very nice system.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2017
  9. May 2, 2017 #9

    cluttonfred

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  10. May 2, 2017 #10

    tspear

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    Put in an epoxy floor. I bought the T-Hangar and had a Schweiss door installed. Works great, but is not cheap.

    Tim
     
  11. May 2, 2017 #11

    Joe Fisher

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    Here are the pictures of my hanger. I built it all .Here in rural Kansas we have on building codes. urhttps://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/forums/album.php?albumid=62
     
  12. May 2, 2017 #12

    Turd Ferguson

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    I have been contemplating adding one of those doors to my barn, however, installation to my existing structure requires forfeiting headroom, width or both and I'd rather not do that. They do operate smoothly and effortlessly.
     
  13. May 2, 2017 #13

    Monty

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    While epoxy is nice, I always feel like I'm around auntie's china trying to control a 5 yr old with nun-chucks when I'm working on something. Unless all you plan to do is park an airplane in there-I prefer a simple concrete slab. If you will conduct maintenance, weld, grind, machine, jack, move heavy things etc, a coating WILL get damaged, scratched, scored, burned, or stained. I prefer a process where the concrete contractor finish trowels ground quartz into the surface as the concrete cures. Then stain and seal it with a binder like diamond hard or something similar. A smooth troweled surface like this will be much more durable, especially to welding and grinding sparks. Spills can stain it, but you can minimize this by keeping it sealed. If you gouge or scratch it, you can spot repair with epoxy filled with quartz. If you wonder what this looks like, just visit a newly constructed Lowe's. Concrete polishing is another option, but expensive. I prefer the quartz and staining. Put the money you would spend on epoxy into a better concrete finish. I've tried them both. I wound up scraping up the coating and polishing the underlying concrete. Can't really recommend that either-too much work. Though the polished floor is nice, the satin look of a burnished quartz floor is just as functional, and much less work/expense.
     
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  14. May 2, 2017 #14

    Aircraft Artist

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    I am now looking into metal building companies...I called up Olympia Steel Buildings (https://www.olympiabuildings.com/) and they said that 80% of the people that buy them erect the building themselves. They also said that all their pieces "bolt" together. That seems relatively simple.... As a side note, why are there so many metal building companies? There are so many I can't count.

    I am expecting a call back from Schweiss doors....they have free-standing doors for buildings without the structure to support the door: https://www.bifold.com/free_stand_steel.php
     
  15. May 2, 2017 #15

    Little Scrapper

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    To try and save time, cost and headaches I'd talk with another owner who built what you want and use his plan. Calculations have already been done and state and municipal codes have been met etc.

    I'm a master plumber and business owner and have worked on multiple hangars. If you want radiant heat I'd be happy to design it for you for free. Same with a bathroom etc.

    There's ways of spending too much on these things and ways of holding a tight budget. Good luck, feel free to reach out if you need to.
     
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  16. May 2, 2017 #16

    kent Ashton

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    It's only free-standing because of the big frame and concrete pillars. That's got to be expensive. The HP units seem to be balanced. I don't own one but they seem to only need a few bolts into a shallow foundation.
     
  17. May 2, 2017 #17

    Little Scrapper

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    There's a lot of companies but you'd be surprised how few actual manufacture and coat the steel....others just put a name on it. I have a 50 x 100 menards building. The materials were perfect, labor was contracted out to a local guy and was dirt cheap. It's really quite affordable if you do it right. I'll see if I can find some photos on my phone.
     
  18. May 2, 2017 #18

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    The only photo I have on my phone is of my daughter on the CA tractor with the building behind it.

    3 service doors, 3 overhead doors, windows on all 4 sides. 3 experienced carpenters built this in 4 days. The Skytrack was vital. The labor was so cheap I'm embarrassed to tell you what it was.

    Honestly, good Carpenters are a great value. To say I'm impressed with Menards is an understatement. Morton and Cleary had pretty competitive bids with each other but
    Menards was an easy winner. No regrets whatsoever, but I'm not sure is Seattle has a Menards.

    Natural light is important. I have translucent panels on the roof every 12 feet for natural light and boy is that nice.
    20170502_174151.jpg
     
  19. May 3, 2017 #19

    Pops

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    Build as large as you can afford. You will fill it.
    I am fortunate, live in the middle of nowhere, so the only restrictions is an inspection on a septic system. Also one of the lowest realty taxes in the nation. So get an idea of how much your taxes are going to go up, you may not like it.
    On a metal building, if any steel is exposed to the outside and inside of the building the cold and heat will wick through the steel to the inside and make it harder to heat and cool.

    Dan
     
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  20. May 3, 2017 #20

    akwrencher

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    Also, see if you can find some reviews on the metal building manufacturer. My friend /boss has one that was a nightmare to put up. Nothing fit right. Did NOT bolt together easy. I'm sure they are not all like that, just saying is worth doing your homework before you write the check.
     

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