Quantcast

Building an Ultra Pup from plans

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

E28POWERM20

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2016
Messages
103
Location
Hillsboro, OR
I'm strongly considering building the "Preceptor" Ultra Pup. It seems to be the perfect blend of low stall, decent cruise, good useful load and range, 2 seats, low-ish build cost, VW power, simple construction, folding wings, and so on. I acquired the plans from the flypreceptor Yahoo group, so they're not "legit" plans, but since Preceptor is gone, and no way of buying plans, I don't feel so bad. The plans I have appear to be complete, and I have all the videos and "build manual", and I have a good ability to interpret the drawings.

Has anyone built an Ultra Pup from plans since Preceptor went under? I know I will have to fabricate the wing tanks, and buy spars from Carlson(I hope they stay in business).

I know legally I shouldn't call it an Ultra Pup, so a creative name is in order.

Are there any factors I'm not thinking of? There is a lot of knowledge on the yahoo group, but it's not too active lately to answer questions, unless they've already been addressed.

I'm also open to better alternatives, as long at they have similar specs, and are low cost/plans.

Ian Robb
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,874
Location
Wisconsin
It's a plenty big project. I looked over one of these pretty extensively about 10 years ago. The cost isn't any cheaper than any other VW powered airplane but you do get the benefit of folding wings. I was impressed overall when looking at it. Seemed well thought out. In the looks department it was a home run.
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,874
Location
Wisconsin
Yeah, I'm a big fan because bang for your buck is just really nice. If you're careful I'm confident you can build a little Continental yourself and still be pretty cheap.

Just remember. Building a steel tube fuselage is still building a steel tube fuselage. You still have to go through the effort regardless of airplane choice. Both airplanes need covering, the effort is still the effort.

The Wag A Bond will still take more time and will be more expensive but if you're careful I bet it's not as big as you'd think. If two seat was the game I'm playing and occasionally cross country I'd build either a Wagabond, Buttercup, or Bearhawk. Those 3 are my choices there's certainly others. It's the two seat that's a game changer.
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,874
Location
Wisconsin
Earl Luce built his Buttercup for about $12,000 if my memory is correct, pretty sure he told me that number.

Of course, he had the engine and he's skilled at multiple tasks and knows the right people so there's an advantage I suppose. But still, I think you could build a very affordable tube and fabric airplane capable of occasional cross country and on a Continental.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,172
Location
Memphis, TN
Earl Luce's plans are nice and he is nice. Hard to beat. I would not make the moving leading edge if I built a Buttercup; simplify some stuff up. You would need the Butterburger plan addition from Clement if you cant extrapolate what to do. All these planes are different flavors of the same recipe.
 

E28POWERM20

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2016
Messages
103
Location
Hillsboro, OR
I think I want to stick with metal wing designs, as living in Oregon and be hard on wood, and hangar space can be tough to come by. I think a folding wing is best, since I may have to beg someone to borrow a corner of a hangar during the wet/cold months.
 

Little Scrapper

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
5,874
Location
Wisconsin
Build the Ultra Pup. Build the greatest Ultra Pup this world has ever seen. It's a great choice.
 

cluttonfred

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
8,010
Location
Fort Walton Beach, Florida, USA
I am not familiar enough with the plans or details of the Ultra Pup to know how hard it would be to build from plans what was originally sold as a kit. For the creative name, given your Oregon location, how about Beaver Kit (a kit being to a beaver what a pup is to a dog).

Since you are also considering other designs, I know you said you didn't like wood wings, but a Milholland Cabin Eagle would be easier to build than any of the designs you've mentioned and would have folding wings. Personally, I'd have no problem with wood wings in the Northwest, I'd just be sure to give them a good coat of appropriate varnish and drain holes in the structure and fabric.

10923570_427978947358166_1216674353298492146_n.jpg 10805743_411331495689578_3191424341846722172_n.jpg

http://www.betterhalfvw.com/Cabineagle.htm
http://www.betterhalfvw.com/cabinpicturedetail.htm
https://www.facebook.com/MilhollandCabinEagleAirplane/
 

E28POWERM20

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2016
Messages
103
Location
Hillsboro, OR
I think the plans were the same regardless of scratch building, or kit building. I believe Bob Counts made the plans long before the kits were ever produced.

As far as a name, I might use a variation of a dog name inspired by my very recently deceased Alaskan Malamute.

I looked closely at all the Eagle planes, they look like planes. However, the Doubles are still a new design, and I'd like to go with a "safer" design. The cruise speed on the Eagles are fairly low too.

The wood wing issue comes from the fact I likely won't have a full time hangar, and it will spend a bit of time outside, at times in the rain. Metal wing would probably be cheaper too.

Ian Robb
 

JIC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
290
Location
Middleton, Idaho
From info I have read on the preceptor group sight the wood wings are lighter.

you could build something like this,which is a j-3 kitten.40393_1162999796.jpg
 
Top