Brutality Today

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by choppergirl, Aug 4, 2017.

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  1. Feb 19, 2019 #261

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    Wait a minute, your friend Elise is 6'9"!
    That's taller than me!

    Speaking of pillions. I had a Honda Camino moped as a teen. It refused to die, whatever I did to it. It has a centrifugal clutch, no variable gearing and was stated at 1.8hp. yeah, bicycles would sometimes overtake me. Well, one day, I had the fantastic idea of riding 10 miles with my friend Bruce on the back. Maybe 120lbs. Well, every time I pulled away from a stop, the **** thing would pull a huge slow motion wheelie. It was hilarious. I had some control issues, due solely to the amount of laughter that was happening.
     
  2. Feb 19, 2019 #262

    Derswede

    Derswede

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    I will jump in with a story too. Was almost home in NC heading back from a customer visit in Ft. Payne, AL and stopped for fuel for the motorcycle (Triumph Sprint). Pull up to the pump that was open. A Prius and a Hummer were at the other two pumps. Apparently they knew each other as they were swapping insults about each other's vehicle. The Hummer owner in response to the Prius' owner snarky comment about having to take out a bank loan to fill the Hummer's tank, said that he keeps a Prius and a 5 gal gas can in the back of the Hummer "just in case". The Prius owner snips back a comment about him getting 49 miles per gallon. As I finish topping up the Triumph's tank, the Hummer owner looks at me as says, "I bet he gets better mileage than that!" I grin, do a quick calculation and say, 68 MPG! The Hummer owner looks at the Prius owner and says, "I bet he has a lot more fun as well!" I do the thumbs up and head out. Best ever was 75mpg, but I had the carbs dialed in just right. Average is a bit lower. I do have a spare engine....hmm...Triumph powered ultralight.....and it looks as if I will be making an offer on a Quicksilver this week.

    Derswede
     
  3. Feb 19, 2019 #263

    choppergirl

    choppergirl

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    I find my mpg increases the slower I cruise at (so it's variable) and of course number of stops/starts:
    35mph, I get roughly 70mpg on the rebel.
    45mph, I get roughly 60mpg
    60mph, I get roughly 50mpg
    Some mopeds with top speed of 35 get 80-100mpg+ (so I've read) and it's easy to believe - there's very little vehicle - there! Pretty amazing mpg for a vehicle that has been around... forever (before cars).

    When you don't have to haul around four heavy glass windows, a heavy crash cage, roof, doors, spare tire, 4 seats, am/fm radio, air conditioning system, radiator full of water, 15 gallons of fuel, carpet, bumpers, four heavy tires and rims, and a bunch of nonsense you accumulated in the back seat or trunk (or truck bed)... mpg goes up up up even with a rather inefficient engine.

    Motorcycles have kept me mobile when I no longer could (or can) afford the expensive of driving a heavy car at 20mpg. That, and I simply started to hate working on cars even with the help of my dad. Dirt in your eyes from below, oil on your hands, busted knuckles. Freezing my butt off in the winter is a trade off I make for never having to work on old cars ever again. When new cars all went front wheel drive, and were no longer user maintainable, I was like that's it, I'm boycotting cars forever (not like I could afford one ever, anyway).

    I tell people never, ever, ever buy a front wheel drive car - but they don't listen. That junk gets passed down to the poor when they buy a new car every 5/10 years, and we are left with something there is no possible way to take the engine out of to repair or rebuild. Once the engine goes kaput on a front wheel drive car you might as well crush the entire car, even if the entire rest of the car and body is in gorgeous pristine condition. The amount of insane labor involved to take out a front wheel drive engine and put it back in again makes it labor prohibitive to fix. Any serious engine or transmission problem (on a front wheel drive car that could be fixed on an old school rear wheel drive), sends them straight to your backyard to collect leaves or the junkyard.

    I would like to have a small toyota truck just for occasional hauling stuff, or for those days that if I did have a job and did have to drive to work in the rain, I wouldn't arrived soaked and have to change. Your shoes in particular get soaked.

    ~

    Going to try to do some welding today on the L channel to square up the trailer front. Using the existing trailer frame again as my squaring template like I did the back end extension. Whoever welded up this trailer frame themselves from scratch did an incredible job squaring it up and with great welds. In retrospect, though, I wish I had started with a trailer in a lot better shape, than one that was rusted all to heck, it would of been less work, this has taken foreverrrrr.

    I cursed yesterday because the 1/2" pvc pipe I bought was 1/2" on the inside, not 1/2" on the outside, and din't match what I already had. Both labeled 1/2" pvc. GRRR!
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
  4. Feb 19, 2019 #264

    BBerson

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    Honda engines outlast the body. My yellow CRX is all rusted out from salt. Still doesn't use oil at 225k on the odometer.
     
  5. Feb 19, 2019 #265

    Dana

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    Pipe is sized by ID, though it's the nominal size, not exact. The wall thickness is determined by "schedule", ie. schedule 40, schedule 80 (thicker), etc. Yeah, it doesn't make sense.
     
  6. Feb 20, 2019 #266

    choppergirl

    choppergirl

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    Ain't that the truth, the 1/2" exterior pipe will not slide into the 1/2" interior pipe :-/
     
  7. Feb 20, 2019 #267

    Twodeaddogs

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    Chopper, you really need a Ural in your life. Throw away the Russian engine and fit a BMW flat twin.
     
  8. Feb 20, 2019 #268

    lr27

    lr27

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    I dunno. I think front wheel drive is probably ok. I've had 4 front wheel drive cars over the years. I got an engine rebuilt on one of them. A bit expensive, but it was a good car and I got another 40,000 miles out of it that way, I think. All these cars, except the one I'm driving now, rusted to death. The Saturn made it somewhere over 250,000 miles, and all the others had fairly high mileage when they died. I'll admit that the BMW 2002 I had for a while was easier to work on, though. It died of rust as well. My first car was an old Volare wagon. Easier to work on, lots of room, durable engine, not terribly reliable and was a Newtonian frame of reference*.


    *It couldn't stop, go, or turn.
     
  9. Feb 20, 2019 #269

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    The labor to remove/install a front wheel drive engine is about the same as it is to remove/install a rear wheel drive engine. I think front wheel drive is probably a bit easier.
     
  10. Feb 20, 2019 #270

    lr27

    lr27

    lr27

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    OTOH, having changed the water pump on a Ford Fiesta, I suspect that's an easier job with some rear wheel drive cars. I used to have a guy do some of the work on my car. The day I was doing the water pump he stopped by to laugh at me.

    BTW, having been a passenger in two cars that rolled over, and having been hit while bicycling several times, including on sunny days with no visibility problems, I'm all for hauling around a crash cage. Maybe if the driver's test included shining a flashlight in one ear and seeing if any of the light came out of the other ear.....

    -----------
    choppergirl:
    If you're drinking soda by the case, you might want to speed up your projects as you'll have less time to do them. Also, you may want to pick designs that have a somewhat higher useful load, or at least consider more powerful engines.

    BTW, in my experience, there's been some progress in the reliability of cars. So something 10 years old might be more reliable than what you could get 25 years ago. Even my Saturn, as I recall, didn't need much until it was over 200,000 miles. Rust repair and brake work is what I recall.
     
  11. Feb 20, 2019 #271

    choppergirl

    choppergirl

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    I'm getting a non-operatational 503 with the Poorgirl, that's probably about the highest rated engine I'll go... and just to be able to tow a primary glider, so I can start a free glider school, if it will do it. If not, oh well, I put up with overpriced Rotax parts or use my Cuyuna if I can rebuild that instead.

    ~

    We have a whole field of front wheel cars my sister bought to get her to and from work over the years, that didn't last, and that nobody can fix. You open the hood and it's like looking at sardines packed in a can. No way to get a wrench in there. Forget it.

    I took the top end off a front wheel drive Ford Escort with an interference engine that had made crunchy popcorn bits out of the valves when I was driving it. Put it back together with new head and valves. Yeah, no kidding, me, I did that, fiddling with those tiny keepers and all. Took all the carbon off and everything, new gaskets, etc. It ran perfect again for all of 2 minutes and then one of the piston rods broke. There was no way in heck I was going to take out that engine and transmission to be able to come in from the underside to fix *that*. FORRR GETTTT ITT.

    The car is still sitting in my back yard collecting leaves :-( Still runs on 3 cylinders I imagine, but I don't dare drive it. Nice pristine interior, good body, nothing wrong with the rest of the car. Just like all the other front wheel cars parked in the field to rot.

    The car was given to me after it broke. I had half a mind to push the car down a hill through the front glass window of a Ford Dealership with a sign taped to the front window that read "Here's your interference engine back". Think I told this story on here before, so don't be surprised.

    If you don't know what an interference engine is, google it, you'll be appalled anyone could get away foisting such a thing on the public... basically if a rubber belt breaks, whatever of your valves are left in the way of the traveling pistons become crunchy parts (and apparently in my case fatally damaging your piston rods to boot). If it weren't for the catalytic converter and muffler, you'd literally have crunchy engine parts coming out your exhaust on your car when that rubber belt breaks. And rubber belts... break.

    So that's why I drive old, simple motorcycles. :-/ It's cold and it sucks in the winter but they keep me mobile and at least I can keep them running and fix them if they break.

    Anyway, this thread isn't about cars or motorcycles, it's a thread about me trying to scrounge together an airplane operation (a minimalist airplane and everything needed to support flying it, getting it to the airport, keeping it out of the weather, etc) from the grass roots ground up. I kept the title purposely vague and general for "all the other stuff you have to do that is not directly putting a rivet through a piece of aluminum" to get flying. Reality fights you every step of the way, at least it does me, whatever can go wrong does go wrong, and you have to overthrow reality to your will. Contest of wills, so to speak, how are you going to get brutal today to get one step closer to finished and flying with everything you need? A truck, a trailer, a hanger, a grass strip, an airplane, a flight simulator, tools, spare parts, whatever the bare minimum turns out to be for my plan, the whole kit and caboodle.

    Unless you got a fat checkbook, you need more than just an airplane to fly... and if you got a fat checkbook, why even bother, just buy an airline ticket and be happy. Because this... this is hell. Finish one headache, another one comes up you got to solve.

    This is my first airplane, and building airplanes don't come naturally to me... I'm not cut out for it and not really taking to it... so... it's a struggle :-/ I'd like to finish what I started though.

    ~

    I watch *a lot* of flying videos, and it looks to me, like a pilot is constantly on pins and needles and not having fun at all... so I'm always asking myself, is this even going to be enjoyable when I finish it? Is it going to be worth all this freaking... work. I'm worried even if I do finish my plane, which is highly unlikely still at this point and a long shot, I'll fly it once and be like... well, that was scary as **** and that sucked, lets not do that... again. Or equally worse... that was boring, I took off, I flew around, I landed. *sigh*. Too much effort to drag the plane out to the airport on that big trailer and set up the wings and go through all that again. Do it a few times and just come to the conclusion it's not worth the trouble, or figure out someway to get my hands on some pole barn hanger affair next to a grass strip where I can just jump in and go. Then that's a whole 'nother thing I have to get :-/ Land. Hanger parts. Build hanger. I've been stockpiling tin and lumber and raw building material parts just in case I have to do that, whenever I get my hands on them.

    I watch videos of how people did it in the old days did it before WW2, like after the Great Depression, when they didn't have any money either and times were tough... yet they scrounged and built gliders and cobbled together airplanes and hangers from scratch... so I adopt their mentality.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
  12. Feb 20, 2019 #272

    lr27

    lr27

    lr27

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    Pretty sure that interference engines are not a requirement in front wheel drive cars. Also that timing belt failures are rare if the belt gets changed when it's supposed to. My wife had to get rid of an Escort that was so rusty there was no place to hang the brake lines any more.
     
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  13. Feb 20, 2019 #273

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    Any OHV engine can have piston / valve interference if parts get in the wrong place at the wrong time. My Ranger Duratec engine has a timing chain driving the 2 overhead cams. The #4 piston still managed to smack both exhaust valves in that cylinder. And engines are removed and installed in FWD cars all the time. Not wanting to do it is not the same as impossible to do it.

    CG, I still see no reason why you could not have that UL flying in 30 days. It's an ultralight fercryinoutloud. Bolt on the engine, install a propeller, put sails on and it would be good to go. Do it "rat rod" style, no paint, see if you like it. It will be sad if you invest your life savings and find out you don't like the sport.

    7A7E19D7-730F-4D4B-9C89-D78970CC15DF.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019
  14. Feb 21, 2019 #274

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    Well, lessee: Benie Pietenpol built a hangar, laminated the arches, mixed and poured his own concrete for the floor, then built his plane all in the span of ~2yrs. He got his engine from a junkyard, converted it and bought the materials for the plane locally at the lumber yard.

    Steve Wittman started building one of his pre-depression era racers in the Spring and raced it at the Cleveland Air races later than same yr. Start to finish in just months......(I was at OSH during the moldless composite era and heard Wittman say he liked the composite birds but they just took too **** long to build. (Avg. build time was ~2 yrs.)).

    These guys built from scratch (was there any other way?) and both had a day job so they built in their "spare time" A day job back then was you work all day-daylight to dark.

    Power tools? Nah. Electricity? If you were lucky. Heat? A wood or coal stove. A/C? A-what? People back then were just badass tough.
     
  15. Feb 21, 2019 #275

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    Change the timing belts when you should do and you won't have a problem. It's a maintenance problem, not a design problem. There wree V6 OHV fords in the UK that had crunchy valve gear. they had a fibre timing gear which needed to be periodically replaced. Guess what, people 'saved money' by skipping that...
    Engines NEED maintenance. Yes, the newer ones have been designed to need less. But they all need something.
     
  16. Feb 21, 2019 #276

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    A woman at work had a heart attack a month ago. She loves soda and hates anything resembling exercise. Despite being 15" shorter than me, she is heavier.

    She is 34.

    Scary?
     
  17. Mar 4, 2019 #277

    choppergirl

    choppergirl

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    Nobody does maintenance on anything until it fails, at least not on our farm, there is just too much to fix that is broken, than to have any time to do maintenance on that which is not yet broken. Always a back log. The exception is aviation, where people stay totally on top of things because if something fails, people die. We change motor oil, but otherwise run things until they fail.

    If a simple part fails that they know is eventually going to wear out and fail, and then causes it to fail catastrophically, I consider it to be a piss poor design. Things should be designed to fail gracefully. One of those rubber belts breaking and the engine turning into crunchy bits, yeah, I don't want one. I don't want that to happen when I'm 500 miles from home, or in the morning if I'm late for work, or really, any other time when we now have to pull said total junk car home with a chain and a truck and I always get to be in the rear car having to brake for both of us with power brakes no longer working

    I call them rubber band engines. Don't ever want one. Crunch them all up in a junk yard. Good riddance to bad rubbish :)

    Please don't ever buy an interference engine or a front wheel drive car.
    All you have to do is ask the dealer or seller: Is this a front wheel drive car? Does this car have an interference engine?

    If yes to either, say a polite No Thank You, and ask them to show you their rear wheel drive vehicles with non-interference engines.


    You can thank me 15 years later, when you have to oh I don't know, do something as common as replace the clutch plate in it.

    ~ ~ ~ ~

    Sodas will indeed make you fat and kill you. Tons of Youtube videos about that. Empty carbs that turn right into fat and never fill you up.
    I do my best to give them up, but every now and then I miss them, and if I buy, I might as well buy in bulk to last me a long while.
    You can somewhat mitigate their horrible effects by drinking them with high fiber foods. For me, it's ironically usually a salad.
    The way to give them up is just to never buy them in the first place.


    ~ ~ ~ ~

    Funky little part I made cutting away the section I want out of of an I-beam

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    How I get around having to weld upsidedown

    Usually things take 5x-8x longer than I estimate them to take. This trailer is taking more like 50x-100x... it drags on... and on.. and on.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2019
  18. Mar 4, 2019 #278

    Kenai.pilot

    Kenai.pilot

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    Hey CG,
    When you live on the farm...you learn to make things work, and also to use what ya got.....its the same way out in the bush in Alaska no different.
    I liked your comment about depression era pilots getting in the air....you would like R.S Hoovers blog about building airplanes on the cheap using common materials an average person can get ahold of. THAT is ground zero of experimental aviation....seems like ya are on that road also...Flying is possibly the most relaxing and terrifying thing a person can do simultaneously....its like life its self....not flyng is similiar to a form of death while still living....keep on it!
     
  19. Mar 4, 2019 #279

    choppergirl

    choppergirl

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    [​IMG]

    Too busy for a color scheme?

    I want kind of a common tail color scheme to tie all my planes together, but where I can have different colored planes with big splashes of two tone complimentary solid colors. A high contrast pilot outfit that matches the tail colors.

    I figure I can get away with using black on parts that don't matter too much if they get toasty in the sun.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2019
  20. Mar 5, 2019 #280

    Jerry Lytle

    Jerry Lytle

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    I would be very careful landing on runway 38, could be fake news!
     
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