Bruce Carmichael inspects Mike Arnold's AR-5

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Vigilant1

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Thanks again for this great insight into Mike's project. Obviously, the audio is rough sledding in the early parts due to the simultaneous other conversations in the echo-y shop area, but that adds to the fly-on-the-wall feel. Bruce and Mike running the wave gauge was great stuff.
Mark
 

sming

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Yes! These extra off cuts are still full a little nuggets, thank you Max!
I must say, now you have to tell YOUR tale! What was it like to work with Mike, on the AR-5, the AR-6... I would buy the book!
 

Max Volume

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wave gauge -
Yes! These extra off cuts are still full a little nuggets, thank you Max!
I must say, now you have to tell YOUR tale! What was it like to work with Mike, on the AR-5, the AR-6... I would buy the book!
There is a motherload of AR-6 mini dv tapes somewhere in this house. The harder I look the more frustrating it gets, so it will just have to decide to show up. At some point I will be out of old footage and have to start turning the camera on myself talking and building new guitars - eventually I plan on posting video of Mike helping me build guitars and manning the camera while I hold on to a wet sheet of carbon fiber like I work at a pizzeria. - Mike also helped us make a stupid little tv show (all the shows are posted on the Cosmic Swami's youtube channel) we shot at the studio/workshop by being our "Mr. Announcer" - see if you can spot him - yes, I AM the Cosmic Swami/Col. Mustaffa - Daryl Privette is Brent Brown/Buddy Holiday -
 

Bill-Higdon

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There is a motherload of AR-6 mini dv tapes somewhere in this house. The harder I look the more frustrating it gets, so it will just have to decide to show up. At some point I will be out of old footage and have to start turning the camera on myself talking and building new guitars - eventually I plan on posting video of Mike helping me build guitars and manning the camera while I hold on to a wet sheet of carbon fiber like I work at a pizzeria. - Mike also helped us make a stupid little tv show (all the shows are posted on the Cosmic Swami's youtube channel) we shot at the studio/workshop by being our "Mr. Announcer" - see if you can spot him - yes, I AM the Cosmic Swami/Col. Mustaffa - Daryl Privette is Brent Brown/Buddy Holiday -
Max, Here's a possible explanation for the missing tapes
https://www.reddit.com/r/Glitch_in_the_Matrix/comments/51go4p
 

sotaro

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There is a motherload of AR-6 mini dv tapes somewhere in this house. The harder I look the more frustrating it gets, so it will just have to decide to show up. At some point I will be out of old footage and have to start turning the camera on myself talking and building new guitars - eventually I plan on posting video of Mike helping me build guitars and manning the camera while I hold on to a wet sheet of carbon fiber like I work at a pizzeria. - Mike also helped us make a stupid little tv show (all the shows are posted on the Cosmic Swami's youtube channel) we shot at the studio/workshop by being our "Mr. Announcer" - see if you can spot him - yes, I AM the Cosmic Swami/Col. Mustaffa - Daryl Privette is Brent Brown/Buddy Holiday -
I am sorry to have missed the show!
 

sming

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Was watching the part 3... Max, any comment on Mike's technique for sanding? It's obviously master level, but I'm not buying the "oh I just cross sanded for 3 months with a flat piece of wood as a sandboard". Why 3 months?? How many passes of micro + sanding??
 

Max Volume

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Was watching the part 3... Max, any comment on Mike's technique for sanding? It's obviously master level, but I'm not buying the "oh I just cross sanded for 3 months with a flat piece of wood as a sandboard". Why 3 months?? How many passes of micro + sanding??
when I met Mike the AR-5 wing was done - he was deciding on which engine to use - as far as sanding, when I worked with him, he was pretty strict about 45-degree strokes, constantly unclogging the sandpaper with a brush (wire or otherwise) and paying attention to the grit#. I know this sounds elementary, but that's how Mike was; - figure it out - do it right - don't get fancy - I think it took so long because he was gently sneaking up on the glass through the micro - my guess is just 1 application of micro - I could be wrong about that...
 

Norman

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Was watching the part 3... Max, any comment on Mike's technique for sanding? It's obviously master level, but I'm not buying the "oh I just cross sanded for 3 months with a flat piece of wood as a sandboard". Why 3 months?? How many passes of micro + sanding??
It's just block sanding with several sanding grits and layers of material. The time is in repetition. First you skim coat the whole wing with dry micro. Then rough it out with a coarse grit paper on a long block. Then switch to a finer paper and sand out the scratches from the previous step, repeat with finer paper until you see spots of fiberglass. Don't sand into the fiberglass. Feel the wing with your hands, you're looking for waves and flat spots. If you feel ANYTHING forward of the maximum thickness of the airfoil slap some more dry micro on and sand again. Work up to 220 grit on the micro, when the micro feels nice and satiny smooth and free of waves or flats (on a curved surface a trough between waves feels like a flat spot) you're ready for the primer which he probably also sanded up to 400 grit. At the primer stage you will either use several coats of primer, sanding between coats, or something like polyester primer-surfacer to lay down a thick coat. Repeat the primer/sand thing until it's all a uniform scuffed texture. Now you can paint it and then wet sand the paint up to at least 600 grit. Then clear coat it. Hey presto, you're done. It takes a few dozen hours of actual work. There are lots of block sanding videos on youtube but they're all cars. It's actually the same processes but it would be nice to see someone do it on an actual airplane. Here's one where the presenter uses a fender that has a 2D curve similar to a wing and he demonstrates the same technique that you would use on a wing. The first 14 minutes are spent talking about the sponsor's products so if you aren't interested skip ahead:
 

plncraze

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Mike's first video has his technique as well. Sand, repeat as necessary for three months. Both Carmichael and Strojnik were impressed. I cannot thank you enough for sharing these Max. These gentlemen have decades of experience with various aspects of efficient flying and you saved them for the rest of us.
 

Max Volume

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It's just block sanding with several sanding grits and layers of material. The time is in repetition. First you skim coat the whole wing with dry micro. Then rough it out with a coarse grit paper on a long block. Then switch to a finer paper and sand out the scratches from the previous step, repeat with finer paper until you see spots of fiberglass. Don't sand into the fiberglass. Feel the wing with your hands, you're looking for waves and flat spots. If you feel ANYTHING forward of the maximum thickness of the airfoil slap some more dry micro on and sand again. Work up to 220 grit on the micro, when the micro feels nice and satiny smooth and free of waves or flats (on a curved surface a trough between waves feels like a flat spot) you're ready for the primer which he probably also sanded up to 400 grit. At the primer stage you will either use several coats of primer, sanding between coats, or something like polyester primer-surfacer to lay down a thick coat. Repeat the primer/sand thing until it's all a uniform scuffed texture. Now you can paint it and then wet sand the paint up to at least 600 grit. Then clear coat it. Hey presto, you're done. It takes a few dozen hours of actual work. There are lots of block sanding videos on youtube but they're all cars. It's actually the same processes but it would be nice to see someone do it on an actual airplane. Here's one where the presenter uses a fender that has a 2D curve similar to a wing and he demonstrates the same technique that you would use on a wing. The first 14 minutes are spent talking about the sponsor's products so if you aren't interested skip ahead:
thank you Norman!
 
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