Briggs & Stratton Vanguard 23hp build

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bl_dg

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bl_dg: Are you going to add a center hub to your Eiffel Club, or bolt it on as pictured? Perhaps with 2 bolts?
I have a piece of 2" x 5"OD aluminum round stock that I'm going to machine to fit the stock flywheel. (center over the flywheel nut, bolt on with 4 M8 bolts) All the Eiffel clubs will be plain squares, no hub, but will have a center dowel hole for aligning on the aluminum hub. Then I'll have a flat plate to clamp the clubs to the aluminum hub. (4 bolts) That's the plan, anyway.

Did a little more on the test stand. I got a piece of 1/4" ply mounted for the dash panel. I replaced the wood screws holding the side plates with 5/16" hex bolts. I also got the motor table mounted, and managed to get it to fold for storage inside the uprights. Now, it's just two pieces - base and upright assembly.
 

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billyvray

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Here's a video of a Russian fly-in with the Heath replica with the direct drive V-twin. Such a sharp little plane.
Couple of things I notice:
1) Not a small fellow and not a huge airport
2) Climb performance is what I would expect. Low. Especially compared to all the trikes with big engines and props in the video.

 

Vigilant1

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Here's a video of a Russian fly-in with the Heath replica with the direct drive V-twin. Such a sharp little plane.
Couple of things I notice:
1) Not a small fellow and not a huge airport
2) Climb performance is what I would expect. Low. Especially compared to all the trikes with big engines and props in the video.


I'm not sure which engine this is. A glimpse of the spec sheet (36:05) says it is 24 HP but has a displacement of 690cc. I think I saw this plane in another video, but can't find it now.

It looks like a fun little airplane.
 

bl_dg

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Here's a video of a Russian fly-in with the Heath replica with the direct drive V-twin. Such a sharp little plane.
Couple of things I notice:
1) Not a small fellow and not a huge airport
2) Climb performance is what I would expect. Low. Especially compared to all the trikes with big engines and props in the video.


Thanks for the video. Nice little plane, and it looks like our fellow flyers were having a good day.
 

Air Trikes

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Here's a video of a Russian fly-in with the Heath replica with the direct drive V-twin. Such a sharp little plane.
Couple of things I notice:
1) Not a small fellow and not a huge airport
2) Climb performance is what I would expect. Low. Especially compared to all the trikes with big engines and props in the video.


I was there. You can see Canadian flag at the first seconds of the video. You also can see a lot of converted engines with SPG gearboxes. This is not something extraordinary in Russia, many people build their own engines.
 

bl_dg

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I got the engine bolted to the 'motor table' for the test stand. (I re-attached the fan, to give the engine some kind load during break-in.)

I installed the gauges, but still have to wire everything up. The CHT leads fit the spark plugs perfectly. The oil pressure sender will mount off of the small plug by the oil filter. The oil temp sender, I haven't decided yet. I got a 1/8-to-1/4 NPT adapter and the sensor ends up buried inside the adapter. I may need to machine down the adapter so the sensor is more exposed to the oil.

So: tach, dual CHT, oil temp, oil pressure. Anything else?

Dang - it's snowing out now!
 

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Vigilant1

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So: tach, dual CHT, oil temp, oil pressure. Anything else?
Well, since you seem to be doing a very thorough job of this, you might consider a wideband O2 sensor and display. That will tell you the air:fuel ratio you are using. You don't strictly need this just to know the HP you are getting in stock configuration, but it will definitely be handy as you start working on tuning improvements. A sensor/readout for each exhaust will conveniently tell you how even your mixture is, but you could get by with a bung in each side and just swap the sensor (or two sensors and a DPDT switch to one readout).
 

Vigilant1

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You'll probably want to know fuel consumption, too. A simple graduated cylinder is cheapest and not prone to calibration error, but an electronic fuel flow readout would give faster/ more responsive info.
Me, I'd probably go the old school route.
 

Vigilant1

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If you want to run it for any length of time, you'll need to reinstall the fan shroud so the fan pushes air through the oil cooler and fins. If you do that, the collection of pressure readings at various points in the air cooling system will provide valuable info about the pressure produced by the fan and pressure drop through the OEM ducting system (which presumably, will prove adequate for cooling up to the OEM rated HP). This data will tell you if you will be able to count on available inflight dynamic pressure to keep your engine happy, or if you'll need to use a fan.
There are electronic pressure sensors suitable for this, but a simple water U-tube manometer (or a bank of them) can serve just as well. Just clear tubing, colored fluid, and height markings behind them is all that is needed.
 
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bl_dg

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EGT and O2 sensors are 'down the road' additions, if and when I get to more serious fine-tuning of the engine. The CHT and oil temp are mostly to keep me from cooking the engine during testing.

As for the fan shroud, I won't be able to use it at all with the Eiffel clubs. The club runs will be short duration anyway. For engine break-in, I want to see how quickly the engine heats up and how hot it gets, and then see how much that changes once there is a propeller on the engine. So again, it will be short duration (limited by CHT/oil temp).

I was expecting some sort of metering device to control how much oil goes through the oil cooler, but it's an open circuit. I'm not really sure how much oil flows through the cooler (%-wise) and how much goes straight through. It would nice to have a thermostat in the circuit. (Or have automatic cowl flaps, controlled by a bellows thermostat, ala VW Beetle.)
 

Vigilant1

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For engine break-in, I want to see how quickly the engine heats up and how hot it gets, and then see how much that changes once there is a propeller on the engine.

That will be interesting to see. The top fin on the heads is about 9" from the center of the crankshaft, and most aircraft propellers just don't move much air that close to the hub. And, of course, the hottest part of the heads (exhaust ports) will be around the back side in your flywheel-drive application. Once you start running the engine longer, you may need ducts and a small diameter, high solidity axial fan (on one end or the other) to keep oil temps and CHTs in the green. A junkyard 12V radiator fan, leaf blower, etc might do the trick. and not consume any engine power.
 

TiPi

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I was expecting some sort of metering device to control how much oil goes through the oil cooler, but it's an open circuit. I'm not really sure how much oil flows through the cooler (%-wise) and how much goes straight through. It would nice to have a thermostat in the circuit. (Or have automatic cowl flaps, controlled by a bellows thermostat, ala VW Beetle.)
Simple test: remove the hose from the oil cooler inlet, point it straight up and plug a large syringe into the open hose. Then slowly turn the engine until the oil is at the bottom of the syringe. Turn the engine 5 or 10 turns and measure the oil in the syringe, divide by the number of engine turns. That number multiplied by your engine rpm will give you the flow per minute.
FYI, on the 49 I measured 3.5ml/revolution, so get an oil flow of ~12.6lpm at 3,600rpm. On the 49, that is the oil that flows through the filter & cooler.
 
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Vigilant1

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What kind of fan is that?

Thanks!
With fans, "solidity" tells us how much of the available fan "disk" is actually occupied by blades. A "low solidity" axial fan might look like a typical 2 bladed airplane prop (lots of open area) while a " high solidity" axial fan would look more like the face of a turbofan engine (nearly fully occupied by blades).
Here's what the high solidity cooling (exhaust) fan used on the pusher engine of the Cessna Skymaster looks like:
1669520622777.png
In the case of the B&S engine on a test stand, the things we want to cool (heads, cylinders, oil heat exchanger) are pretty close to the crankshaft, so our fan can't be very large in diameter. it will draw about 0.5 to 1 HP to do the job (so, up to 750 watts). With that much power and only about 100 SQ inches of available fan area, a high solidity fan is appropriate. Also, I recall reading that high solidity axial fans are more effective than low solidity fans when working to develop pressure (which is intuitive) and in this case there will be ducting, twists, fin crevices etc that will provide resistance to flow and require static pressure developed by the fan to move the air against that resistance. (Centrifugal blowers, like the OEM industrial engine fans, are also good in these cases).
 
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