Books: Adhesion Science

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
8,736
Location
Rocky Mountains
Ran across 2 books today dealing with adhesives and adhesion science of which I was completely unaware.
They are both $600 books, but if you have an *___*.edu address, or know where to look, they can be downloaded.
2032 pages total, so I obviously haven't read all that much, but from what I've scanned and read I think anyone interested in this subject would find them useful.
I'm personally finding the first volume quite fascinating. It explains, with math*, a lot of how I've visualized adhesively bonded joints to work at both the macro and micro levels.

Adhesion Science and Engineering - 1
Adhesion Science and Engineering -2
Both by A. V Pocius and titled "Surfaces, Chemistry & Applications".

Just thought some of the other 'glue nerds' might find these interesting as well.

* He does a pretty good job of presenting the material in a way that the math really isn't needed to understand the concepts.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
8,736
Location
Rocky Mountains
Spending more time than I probably should reading the first volume. I'm finding it ties all sorts of 'questions' together and from fields we normally consider quite unrelated.
Everything from why some people may be more prone to blood clotting to why friction coefficients aren't linear with load, or when wet. ‼️

eidt:
And to keep this all HBA related it explains in very good detail the how and why of the problems we encounter trying to bond/glue aluminum and why the standard wedge test is probably a pretty good indicator of real world performance.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
17,927
Location
Memphis, TN
Well I think it’s a sticky problem. When building, I don’t want to get stuck adhering to wrong advice. It’s hard to peel me away from the classics. It’s hard to cement a new product when the old are still fixed in cannon. I just don’t like gumming up something that works.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
17,927
Location
Memphis, TN
That’s a different book. It’s much more of a banger.

I could only find the first. It’s everything if you want to develop a new adhesive and need testing guidance. For in field choices, not as adhering.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2009
Messages
8,736
Location
Rocky Mountains
Can you condense the book down to two useful paragraphs for here?
Haven't written a book report in several decades ;)

It is only for those REALLY interested in adhesives. From a practical point of view to someone working in the shop you might find better things to do with your time?
From the preface:

Adhesion science and technology is inherently an interdisciplinary field, requiring
fundamental understanding of mechanics, surfaces, and materials, the topics
emphasized in this Adhesion Science and Engineering series. This volume focuses
attention on the contribution of mechanics principles and solutions to understanding
the fabrication, design, analysis, and testing of adhesive bonds. Building
on the fundamentals laid by such noted mechanicians as Winkler, Timoshenko,
Volkersen, Goland, Reissner, Williams, Gent, and Johnson, this volume offers a
comprehensive overview of the current understanding of stresses, deformation,
and fracture parameters associated with a range of adhesive bonds.
Starting with a background and introduction to stress transfer principles (Chapter
I), fracture mechanics and singularities (Chapter 2), and an energy approach
to debonding (Chapter 3), the volume continues with analysis of structural lap
(Chapter 4) and butt (Chapter 5) joint configurations. The volume continues with
discussions of test methods for strength and constitutive properties (Chapter 6),
fracture (Chapter 7), and peel (Chapter 8). Chapter 9 covers coatings, the case
of adhesion to a single substrate, and Chapter IO addresses elastomeric adhesives
such as sealants. The role of mechanics in determining the locus of failure
in bonded joints is discussed (Chapter 11 ), followed by a chapter on rheology
relevant to adhesives and sealants (Chapter 12). Pressure sensitive adhesive performance
(Chapter 13 ), the principles of tack and tack measurements (Chapter
14), and contact mechanics relevant to wetting and surface energy measurements
(Chapter 15) are then covered. The volume concludes with sections on fibermatrix
bonding and reinforcement (Chapter 16), durability considerations for
adhesive bonds (Chapter 17), ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation of adhesive
bonds (Chapter 18), and design of adhesive bonds from a strength perspective
(Chapter 19).
==============
Lots of little bits of non-intuitive 'wisdom' similar to this:

Many handbooks and manufacturer's literature list the strength from adhesively
bonded lap specimens as the 'apparent' shear strength of an adhesive. This usage
has led some authors to conclude that the apparent shear strength is adequate for
use as a design' parameter. In fact, one popular and otherwise very good textbook
on materials engineering includes the statement:

"Thus in selecting an adhesive system, one must calculate the strength required.
If, for example, you wish to design an adhesive-bonded lifting device
for a 50 lb. (23 kg) machine component, you can use an adhesive with a JOO
psi (0.689 MPa) shear strength and make the bond area 0.5 in2 ( 3.2 cm2 ). You
must use this type ofjoint-strength analysis in all adhesive-joint designs."


While this is certainly a logical method of design, it does not account for the
non-uniform stress distribution within the lap joint nor the induced tensile stress,
and in general may lead to incorrect predictions. For example, a logical extension
of the above statement would be that when the weight of the machine component
is increased to 100 lb. ( 46 kg), the bond area should be increased from 0.5 to 1.0
in2 (3.2 to 6.4 cm2). This would be approximately true if the width of the overlap
is doubled, but most certainly not true if the length of the overlap is doubled. In the
latter case, the increase in joint strength would almost certainly be less than 100%
and likely less than 30%. Furthermore, care must be exercised in referring to the
load at failure divided by the area of overlap as the shear strength of an adhesive as
if it were a material property even though these values are commonly reported in
handbooks and manufacturer's literature.
 
Last edited:
Top