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Biometric Data

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Topaz

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For those of us interested in aircraft design, getting useful biometric data - body dimensions - is always a challenge. The typical homebuilt designer measures him or her self, and calls it a day. That's fine except if you're someone like Ken Rand, designer of the classic KR series of homebuilts. Ken was a small guy, and builders of his designs are constantly widening and lengthening cockpit dimensions accordingly.

I found NASA's online resource for biometric data, and it's really useful. Data is presented generally for year 2000 information, in two generic examples: 40 year-old Japanese woman (small person) and 40 year-old American man (large person). Data is given for 5th, 50th, and 95th percentiles within those two models.

Hopefully this is as useful to you as it has been for me!

 

cvairwerks

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DoD just moved to a new set of design criteria for crew sizing. I believe the new requirements are that the standard person now must cover 90% of the current population, taking into account gender and ethnicity averages. I’ll have to find the link to the requirements when I get home tomorrow.
 

Wanttaja

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About 36 years ago, I was with Boeing's proposal team for the initial contract for what would eventually be the International Space Station. We were mocking-up consoles and whatnot, and the contract required usability for 95th-percentile men and 5th-percentile women.

Most of us were taken to a sort of iron maiden at Boeing's Renton plant that measured various bodily factors. I still have the card I was issued:
Anthropometric data card001.jpg
As you can see, most of my factors were above the 95th percentile.

Ron Wanttaja
 

proppastie

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As you can see, most of my factors were above the 95th percentile
That calculates out that a 95% is 222.4 lb and 210.7 for 90%if the data is linear. But more than likely the data is a bell curve. But for small changes (90 to 95) perhaps a linear calculation is not far off.

 

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fly2kads

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I think this whole field is pretty fascinating. For me, this is a potential rabbit hole.

Here are a few things I have found useful thus far:

Book: The Measure of Man and Woman; Henry Dreyfus Associates
Includes good sections on Vehicular Accommodation and Manual Controls

Book: Anthropometric Methods: Designing to Fit the Human Body; John A. Roebuck, Jr.
Has brief sections on Airplane Cockpits, Airline Passenger Accommodations, and Automotive Vehicle Interiors

Paper: The Derivation of Low Profile and Variable Cockpit Geometries to Achieve 1st to 99th Percentile Accommodation; Kenneth W. Kennedy
https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/ADA173454.pdf
Shows how aircraft seat and pedal adjustments can be used to accommodate the greatest range of pilots. While this paper is written for a specific application, the method is generally applicable.

Paper: A Multivariate Anthropometric Method for Crew Station Design; Richard S. Meindl and Jeffrey A. Hudson
https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/ADA270652.pdf
Demonstrates a statistical method (multivariate analysis) to find correlations among important body measurements. The methods could be used with more current data sets.

Speaking of data sets, if I were developing a commercial product, it might be worth it to spring for the CAESAR (Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource) data from SAE. A joint government/industry group split the cost of using laser scanners to measure ~4400 people in North America and Europe. The data set is $10k USD! There are commercially available computer models based on this data, but they are pricey, too.
 

Wanttaja

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I mentioned in a previous post how I was involved in the early Space Station studies.

One reference we had was in toilet design. It had a bunch of picture of men and women (in separate photos, this was a family publication) naked, urinating with a grid in the background. Designers could use the grid to determine speeds, angles, etc. The people stood in different body postures to show the effects on ballistics.

Ron Wanttaja
 

Jay Kempf

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I've been using SAE data for a long time as well as measuring car cockpits. Found and modified a posable primitive 3D model to use to do offsets to structures and for ergo (pedals, sticks, panels). I think people working in 2D have a much harder time getting this stuff right.
 
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