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BF109 G4 scratch build 1/1 scale

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TFF

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Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
13,832
Location
Memphis, TN
It would be useful if you could add the option of real parts. The 109 at the National D-Day museum in New Orleans has a bunch of fiberglass parts on it. It was pretty much a wreck. A private individual today would build one back with the data plate because of value but technically it would be almost all scraped. The real parts add provenance and tend to perk interest as some is real.
They would be great movie props but they probably would be blown up. Put them on a gimbal hooked to the control stick. Low tech sim for a museum who may have a real one. Interactive
 

whizzywhizzer

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Joined
Mar 27, 2015
Messages
54
Location
melbourne , victoria, Australia
It would be useful if you could add the option of real parts. The 109 at the National D-Day museum in New Orleans has a bunch of fiberglass parts on it. It was pretty much a wreck. A private individual today would build one back with the data plate because of value but technically it would be almost all scraped. The real parts add provenance and tend to perk interest as some is real.
They would be great movie props but they probably would be blown up. Put them on a gimbal hooked to the control stick. Low tech sim for a museum who may have a real one. Interactive
Actually there are lots of original parts on these 109s, gauges, tail wheel, fuel cap, external electric plug and cover ...... etc
 

Wanttaja

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Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,603
Location
Seattle, WA
There were two built in the Dakotas though not exact replicas since they were fiberglass shells on a steel tube fuselage. Even so:
Dakota Messerschmitts
Lest we forget Classic Fighter Industries in Everett, Washington...they built five brand-new ME-262s. They also built a (non-flying) ME-163 Komet replica.

They're currently building a couple of Mitsubishi Zeros... one dead stock, the other with mods to make it a better day-to-day flyer. Dan Hammer, son of the man who owns the company, came by our EAA chapter last year and talked about them. Showed a lot of pictures, and several of our chapter members are volunteers with the company.

He told one interesting story about the Zeros. When the company started building the Me-262s, the Messerschmitt people were overjoyed. Gave them all the drawings they could, and put them in touch with the few remaining pilots. They even assigned the next five Werk Nos. for the aircraft so they had sequential serial numbers to the wartime ones.

When the company started working on the Zeros? Mitsubishi all but denied ever building fighter aircraft. No help from them.

Fortunately, the Zero has almost an mythic effect on aviation fans in Japan. They found a lot of people had been hoarding drawings and parts since the war, and were eager to lend them to the company to help build new ones.

Hammer also said their next project is probably going to be some P-26s....

Ron Wanttaja
 

whizzywhizzer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2015
Messages
54
Location
melbourne , victoria, Australia
Lest we forget Classic Fighter Industries in Everett, Washington...they built five brand-new ME-262s. They also built a (non-flying) ME-163 Komet replica.

They're currently building a couple of Mitsubishi Zeros... one dead stock, the other with mods to make it a better day-to-day flyer. Dan Hammer, son of the man who owns the company, came by our EAA chapter last year and talked about them. Showed a lot of pictures, and several of our chapter members are volunteers with the company.

He told one interesting story about the Zeros. When the company started building the Me-262s, the Messerschmitt people were overjoyed. Gave them all the drawings they could, and put them in touch with the few remaining pilots. They even assigned the next five Werk Nos. for the aircraft so they had sequential serial numbers to the wartime ones.

When the company started working on the Zeros? Mitsubishi all but denied ever building fighter aircraft. No help from them.

Fortunately, the Zero has almost an mythic effect on aviation fans in Japan. They found a lot of people had been hoarding drawings and parts since the war, and were eager to lend them to the company to help build new ones.

Hammer also said their next project is probably going to be some P-26s....

Ron Wanttaja
Yeah there are lots of great recreations, i think its awesome to keep the love of war birds rolling on through the generations
 

radfordc

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Messages
1,414
Lest we forget Classic Fighter Industries in Everett, Washington...they built five brand-new ME-262s. .

Ron Wanttaja
Years ago I just showed up at their door and asked if I could see the planes. They were happy to show me around for a few minutes. I don't know if that's still possible in these times.
 

Marc W

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Messages
547
Location
Colorado
The Planes of Fame museum in Valle, AZ(just south of the Grand Canyon) has an original nearly complete Me-109 G10. The only non original parts are the prop and spinner. It is a plane that was brought back after the war for flight test. Somebody stole the original prop and spinner while it was traveling cross country on a railroad car.
 

robertbrown

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2012
Messages
17
Location
Marietta, GA/USA
Lest we forget Classic Fighter Industries in Everett, Washington...they built five brand-new ME-262s. They also built a (non-flying) ME-163 Komet replica.

They're currently building a couple of Mitsubishi Zeros... one dead stock, the other with mods to make it a better day-to-day flyer. Dan Hammer, son of the man who owns the company, came by our EAA chapter last year and talked about them. Showed a lot of pictures, and several of our chapter members are volunteers with the company.

He told one interesting story about the Zeros. When the company started building the Me-262s, the Messerschmitt people were overjoyed. Gave them all the drawings they could, and put them in touch with the few remaining pilots. They even assigned the next five Werk Nos. for the aircraft so they had sequential serial numbers to the wartime ones.

When the company started working on the Zeros? Mitsubishi all but denied ever building fighter aircraft. No help from them.

Fortunately, the Zero has almost an mythic effect on aviation fans in Japan. They found a lot of people had been hoarding drawings and parts since the war, and were eager to lend them to the company to help build new ones.

Hammer also said their next project is probably going to be some P-26s....

Ron Wanttaja
Quite a few years ago, former slave laborers were trying to get compensation from Mitsubishi. Mitsubishi said "We're not the same corporation that existed during WWII. We just happen to have the same name and all the same facilities." I wouldn't be surprised if their lawyers told them to never admit any connection to WWII.
 
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