Quantcast

Between-the-war aircraft replicas

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Which between-the-war aircraft replica


  • Total voters
    28

Swampyankee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
1,432
Location
Earth USA East Coast
I'm interested in some of the fighters and other combat aircraft from between WW1 and WW2. So my question is, which of these aircraft would be a good choice for a replica, from both a historical (the aircraft's importance) perspective and practicality of build. I'm limiting this to aircraft that were essentially out of service at the beginning of WW2, so I'm not including the Fairey Battle, I-16, CR.32, and CR.42
 

N8053H

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2013
Messages
2,523
Location
Right here in front of my computer
Take something already designed and make it into what you want. This would make a nice looking razor back look-a-like. In the right hands someone could turn something like this into a nice looking WWII bird. I guess this is why they call it an Avenger.

SAM_6104.jpg
 

Knightzone

New Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
4
Location
Michigan
I voted P-26. Like N8053H said, it would be easier to take a completed aircraft and do some work on that. But if you do a replica, I think the design of the Seversky P-35 would be cool, or perhaps one of the Grumman biplane fighters.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
13,832
Location
Memphis, TN
Years ago someone had plans for a P6E reduced size. I don't know if he ever sold any because they were high dollar. I think some was based on the Skybolt. The prototype is in the Oshkosh museum. I believe Chevy 350 powered. It's pretty. A couple of replica P-26s have been made very squirrelly plane but cool.
 

redfox

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
11
Location
PA
Don Sauser built that P6E and offered plans. I've owned two sets and still have one left. Lack of wing rib drawings kinda orphaned that design
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
13,832
Location
Memphis, TN
That's a rare set of plans. Are they drawn well? When they were offered they were expensive. Why no rib drawings or are you given an airfoil and you loft to the position?
 

plncraze

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2006
Messages
1,922
Cool choices! John Isaacs participated in a Fury replica which was supposed to be as close to original as possible. Very complicated he said. There was a full scale F4b built utilizing a Stearman as the starting point which was probably a little simpler. It still was complicated though. A smaller replica based on a proven design would be neat. Get the scale right and it would be cute too.
 

redfox

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
11
Location
PA
TFF, the wing ribs were to be offered as a kit through a laser cutting outfit on the west coast somewhere. All four wings are tapered so my assumption is Mr Sauser wanted uniformly made ribs, and judging by how quickly the family distanced themselve from the design after he passed away I'm fairly sure there were some liabilty fears. There used to be a Sauser support group online with cowl moulds and wing rib tracings floating around but it all kinda petered away around 2004-5 ish
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
13,832
Location
Memphis, TN
I thought the designed predated cheaply available laser cutting; Im surprised there was activity as late as 2005. With a decent CAD operator, would not be that big a deal to do it on your own. With less than 50 sets of plans sold, you have something interesting. I think there was a fuselage welded up floating around a couple of years ago.
 

redfox

Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
11
Location
PA
TFF if I remember correctly there have been 2-3 that flew after the prototype. One was a BFC-2 style with a 275 Jake where the engine broke off during a hard landing, another in OH or IN with the Crate Chevy and I believe one down in Florida as well. To answer your other question, the plans were very well drawn and the airfoil was a Clark Y if I recall...with every wing rib being a different size ;-)

The guy that was keeping the whole group together flew for the Georgian Forestry Commission and was fairly well along with his as well. Think there were 44 plans sets sold, he'd tracked down a couple dozen of us, but only 4-5 were active. It'/ a shame, neat neat design and the front seat/cockpit easy covered and faired for that fighter look
 

lr27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,822
Not really excited about any of these choices. If I had to do the F4B, aka P-12, I'd probably do it with air mail markings:
boeing p-12e in airmail colors.jpg
I'd check to see if there wasn't something from the air mail crisis that might have been a bit more colorful, though.

My own preference, from that era, would be something sleeker. And civilian. Plenty of streamlined looking aircraft from before the war.

How about a Lockheed Altair? If I'm not mistaken, the US military had a couple.
Lockheed-Altair-Inflight.jpg
For biplane fanciers, I was going to suggest the Dragon Rapide, but it persisted into the war.

You could amaze your friends with an Ambrosini SS.4, though I think it rated no more than a footnote in history:
ambrosini_ss-4.jpg

The Supermarine Type 224 was interesting, though it didn't get very far. Unless you count it because it was on the evolutionary path leading to the Spitfire:
supermarine-type-224.jpg

Northrop XFT-1?
northrop xft-1 left front top no known copyright.jpg
Be sure to fix the handling problems!
 

Wanttaja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,603
Location
Seattle, WA
My vote is for a semi-scale P-26 Peashooter with a Verner radial. If looking to tweak an existing design, a Fly Baby would be a good starting point.
Here's a shot of a Fly Baby P-26 replica under construction. The basic fuselage box is there, with stringers added to make the fuselage rounder and the turtledeck modified for the distinctive profile.

It's going to have the stock Continental engine under that round cowl.



Ron Wanttaja
 

lr27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,822
Oh c'mon! You can do better:
Bell-FM-Airacuda-flying-through-the-clouds.jpg
Bell Airacuda (prototype, but how did they even get that far without performing the laugh test?) I'll admit the only cartoon with it I could find was from 1988, where they claimed an impossible speed for it.
 

lr27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,822
Here's a shot of a Fly Baby P-26 replica under construction. The basic fuselage box is there, with stringers added to make the fuselage rounder and the turtledeck modified for the distinctive profile.

It's going to have the stock Continental engine under that round cowl.

image snipped. Save the electrons!

Ron Wanttaja
That's pretty impressive, though I have to admit the wheels don't look at all scale. ;-) I just hope he can keep the weight down. Did he make the cowl? We need to find him a winning lottery ticket so you can use a proper radial in it. Oops. It's for sale. I wonder what happened? We can save the lottery ticked for the purchaser.
http://www.replicafighters.com/Preuss-P26
 
Last edited:
Top