Best Cheap Hanger Door I have ever seen

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by ToddK, Dec 2, 2019.

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  1. Dec 3, 2019 #21

    SlowFlight

    SlowFlight

    SlowFlight

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    Token suggestion. Unistrut has relatively cheap rolling trolleys of different sorts for different configurations. The channel can be special ordered curved. Search for differing dimensions. For recovering wall space, build an interior 'pocket wall for the door or store it externally, straight barn door style or curved. You could also adapt the uni strut angle as a top or frame material. Most common components available in galvanized in the electrical aisle of your local box store. Order specialty stuff from a supplier. Chain operating garage door opener might manage the load cheaply.

    Image search for unistrut trolley and unistrut curved. You may find other purposes such as a lightweight rolling overhead lift. Use within specs.
     
  2. Dec 3, 2019 #22

    ToddK

    ToddK

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    That's interesting as they have stood up to at least 3 hurricanes with zero damage.
     
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  3. Dec 3, 2019 #23

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    There are no perfect doors.

    My last job was in a place that had the modular door idea with three sections and two center posts that rolled out of the way. Those posts were on rollers that wore and started sticking, and all three doors and both posts had to be out of the way to get in or out. Makes work, and if one is trying to get things closed up as a big storm approaches it can be fun.

    My own hangar before that was an ancient wooden thing that had rolling barn doors that had two hinged sections on each side so they could fold back and get the 20-foot-wide sections down to 10 feet so as to not need 20 feet of rail off each end of the building. No tracks at the bottom, so had inside rails (just boards) on posts in the ground to keep the doors from pushing inward in the wind. But ice and snow made life difficult in the winter; any sliding door is going to have problems like that. If the ground heaves with frost you can have a door that ain't going to open until spring.

    Bifold doors that span the entire opening and fold across the middle so that the whole thing rises straight up are the best affair for wintery areas, and if it's electrically-powered, so much the better. A stout truss across the center on the outside takes the wind loads.The flight school had that door, 60 feet wide and 18 tall. It was heavy, 4500 pounds, being that big, and needed a strong frame built into the front of the hangar. A 40-foot-wide and 8-tall door could be made to far, far less than that weight, especially if it was wood instead of structural steel tubing. A smaller version:

    [​IMG]

    See the sag in the door along the hinge? That's because that door doesn't have the external stiffening truss along the bottom edge of the top section. Note, too, that the door is much taller than it needs to be.
     
  4. Dec 3, 2019 #24

    BJC

    BJC

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    If you believe the national weather service, we had a cat 2 hurricane here a couple of years ago. The center of the eye passed about 20 miles west of my house. We never had ground level winds of more than 40 MPH.


    BJC
     
  5. Dec 3, 2019 #25

    Lendo

    Lendo

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    I'm wondering, if instead of sliding the doors inside, if they could slide outside - just a thought!
    George.
     
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  6. Dec 4, 2019 #26

    Pops

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    I saw the wind blow down the the 12' x 12' commercial door on the rear of my neighbors hanger. Parts of the door almost made it to his like new 1943 Stearman. Straight across the runway from me the wind destroyed a 40' x40' hanger with a C-172 inside. Smashed the 172 to the ground. Yes, it does happen and you can't build the hanger and doors strong enough.
    I have a house garage door on the side of my hanger for the autos, and its been caved in 3 times from snow sliding off the hanger roof. This summer I built a small roof over the door . Should put the pile of snow away from the door.
     
  7. Dec 5, 2019 #27

    Doggzilla

    Doggzilla

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    This is a brilliant idea.
     
  8. Dec 6, 2019 #28

    PW_Plack

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    Buy free-standing shelving, and set it up a foot from the wall, so the door can slide in behind it. Bonus: You can now access the back side of the shelves when the door is closed, or even get back there with a broom to clean up after the birds and mice.
     

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