Bending Brake issues

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by 12notes, Nov 4, 2017.

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  1. Nov 9, 2017 #21

    TFF

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    Or all who have seen the T2 build video. You whack the caps over with a mallet over a buck; they are reenforced by angle. The trailing edge is aluminum folded with 2x4 clamping boards and you jack your car up and put the fixture under a car wheel and bring the weight at the wheel down on the boards. Why would you do it any other way?
     
  2. Nov 9, 2017 #22

    Pops

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    Here is a little 12" brake that I built from scrap steel for folding 4130 steel fitting, just use C-clamps for clamp pressure. Another for folding the "C" type tail ribs on Bearhawks. Will fold down to 3/8" wide "C" shape X 30" long. I use 3 bottle jacks on the clamping bar.
    Also built a small 12" shear for small work like alum stiffening angles for Bearhawk ribs. Lots of tools you can make from scrap steel. Local steel sales company will let you come in and pick through their cut-offs and scrap and buy per the pound for scrap steel prices.
    Picture of the Miller welded that I got for nothing. A man that I knew well called me and was moving out of state and had 2 welders for sale. One Miller and one Hobart. He want $300 for both and would deliver them. Had to move the next day.
    I kept the Miller and sold the Hobart for $300, and I kept the 100' of welding cable that came with the welders.

    Picture of the Craftman saw . One day about 15 years ago a man stopped by my shop and ask me if I would keep the saw, he had just bought it at Sears and he lived in an apartment with no room to unpack it. He said if he ever needed to saw some steel he would like to come and use it. I have never seen him since.
     

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  3. Nov 9, 2017 #23

    BJC

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    Always wanted one of those, and, years ago, had an opportunity to buy one for a very reasonable price. I had no place to keep it, so I did not buy it. I have the room now, but don’t really need it.


    BJC
     
  4. Nov 9, 2017 #24

    lathropdad

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    103_0309.jpg

    Here is a press brake I built years ago. This one is 48" wide. The top plate has a grove cut the length so I can change the tools I use. The tooling in the press now is to bend a 1/4 inch radius. The bottom has two tubes 1.5" square and 1/4 wall. This tube has a nice radius that I have polished. The tubes are adjustable ( you can see 4 SHCS to adjust the visible side). The same setup is on the opposite side. I use this for bending the leading edges on race car wings. But I have found many uses for this tool on my 4 place Bearhawk project. It will bend close to 180 degrees depending on material. For accurate bends, I can use dial indicators to make duplicates of a bent.
     
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  5. Nov 9, 2017 #25

    BBerson

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    My $400 Harbor Freight 48" brake does what I need now. The 10 foot isn't that useful. I bought it to make spar cap angle laminations. It could only do .032". Easier and stronger to make or buy laminations with .062", which requires a press brake.
     
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  6. Nov 10, 2017 #26

    lakeracer69

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    I built this exact brake and am mounting it to my newly finished build table. I used MS20001 1-1/2" hinge as that is what I had. I went with 4" X 4" X 1/4"HRS angles. I will report back this weekend when I am ready to bend some .025 6061 T6. I have a couple of 8' long angle pieces to bend. I'm building a Lil' Bitts so it is about to get a bunch of use for wing parts.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2017
  7. Nov 10, 2017 #27

    Winginit

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    I hope you get good results ! Keep us posted.
     
  8. Nov 10, 2017 #28

    proppastie

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    Back to the bending....If you do not have the proper set-back for the proper bending radius, you will be "pinching" the metal against the hold down. Now .04 2024-t3 is 36Kpsi yield and 1025 steel is 36kpsi yield. If you are pinching against a radiused hold down it is not going to work. You have to have the proper "set back" and even then the geometry of the hinge/work, there will be a larger moment on the "mild steel" hinge so that it may bend even though it is thicker. You can not get a heating guy to bend it properly and a proper sheet metal shop is going to charge lots, and unless it is "aircraft" might screw it up. You probably will have to live with the angle extrusions it will not weight that much more. Good luck
     
  9. Nov 10, 2017 #29

    TFF

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    Also bending thick metal, it is easy to crack. You have to be careful and bend in increments feeling the metal.
     
  10. Nov 11, 2017 #30

    lakeracer69

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    Ok, The brake as I built it works fine. I bent an 8 foot piece of .025 6061 T6 with a .125 radius ( with the grain for obvious reasons ) and it came out perfect. I would think .032 would be the limit though for this brake. For a couple of hundred bucks and no headaches from the local HVAC sheetmetal benders I have a very useful brake. I used 1/8 monel blind rivets. Follow the guys directions and you'll have a useful brake too.
     

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  11. Nov 11, 2017 #31

    RJW

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    Bending mild steel sheet is nothing compared to bending .040” 2024T3.

    Rob
     
  12. Nov 11, 2017 #32

    Hot Wings

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    Yes they do work well within their limits. But huge thread drift:

    Do your building inspectors let you get away with that kind of wiring in your part of the US !?
     
  13. Nov 11, 2017 #33

    Pops

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    Not everyone lives in highly controlled areas. I live in a county of 5008 people without a stop light. You can build anything you want without an inspection except for the inspection of a septic system and that cost nothing. When we built the grass field runway, we talked to the nearest neighbors and no one had a problem except for one. We took him for an airplane ride and he sold us land to extend the runway and said he would like to learn to fly if he wasn't so old.
     
  14. Nov 13, 2017 #34

    lakeracer69

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    If you are referring to my 200amp service with generator ATS in the background, you have no idea what you're looking at. Everything there is up to code and then some.
     
  15. Nov 13, 2017 #35

    Hot Wings

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    Had a fair idea what I was seeing and personally would have no problems with it in my shop or home. In fact it looks relatively neat and organized. But around here every bit of that would have to be in conduit or at least behind sheet rock if in a residential setting. My comment was not one of criticism of the wiring. It was more due to my envy of someone living where there is apparently some common sense remaining.
     
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  16. Nov 13, 2017 #36

    proppastie

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  17. Nov 13, 2017 #37

    lakeracer69

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    My apologies, that's in my basement. Things like basement outlets, well pump, service entry are in conduit. Everything else is just romex to the panel. Color coded for wire size nowadays.
     
  18. Nov 13, 2017 #38

    Winginit

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    Not to drift the thread, so a quick answer. I have a water cooled torch for my Tig machine and as you can see the cart is a hodge podge of components cobbled to meet my needs for the water cooling. It has more capacity than the cheapest (appx $600-$800) Miller factory cooler and it stays with the welder when I have to move it. The fans were pilferred from some test equipment and blow thru an adapted transmission cooler mounted under the shelf on the cart. You might think a water cooled torch with three cable/lines would be larger and heavier than air cooled, but its actually smaller and more manueverable.


    DSCN5659.jpg DSCN5660.jpg

    Enuff about welding and back to bending........
     
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  19. Dec 11, 2017 #39

    12notes

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    I replaced the bolt/tube hinges with the piano hinge a few weeks ago, and extended it to a 6' bending area, then didn't have anything large to bend for a while, so I never drilled the holes for the hold down bolts. I needed to bend a few 21" long pieces of .040" 2024-T3 this weekend, so I went ahead and drilled the bolt holes and tested it out.

    The brake bent them no problem. The table I bolted it to, however, is too light, so I was bending it with one arm and holding the table down with the other. If I find a more suitable workbench to bolt it down to, I'll test the 40" long piece of .040" 2024-T3 I was originally trying to bend.
     
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  20. Nov 8, 2018 #40

    12notes

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    I've been using this brake repeatedly for my build, and it's bent everything that I've used so far no problem, but I forgot to try to bend the 40" piece of .040" 2024-T3 until I picked it up a couple of days ago. Better late than never.

    I could not bend it with the brake I built. The problem wasn't flexing, I just could not get enough leverage on it without picking up the table the brake was bolted to. Also, the piece is only 1-1/2" wide, much of the leverage is lost as there is only 3/4" sticking out. I can try again the next time I have a heavy friend around to sit on the table, or if I have a wider piece left over when I'm done with the build.
     

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