Being practical with the homebuilt.vs. certified decision

Discussion in 'General Experimental Aviation Questions' started by Peterson, Jul 31, 2015.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Sep 19, 2015 #61

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    Messages:
    4,830
    Likes Received:
    2,046

    Cessna publishes Service Bulletins all the time, many of them dealing with issues related to aging airplanes. Fatigue cracks are not unusual, and when Cessna sends out SBs we get serious about them and have a look, and sure enough, we might find exactly what they're talking about. It's no different from old cars with many miles on them. The 172 tends to crack at the bottom of the aft doorposts, where the post meets the gear box. The horizontal stab's forward spar cracks, as we've seen. Some models would crack the forward doorposts at the door lower hinge. The engine mount attach points inside the firewall sometimes crack inside the channel, where it's hard to see. A borescope catches that. The engine mounts of some would crack at the lower transverse tube welds. The mufflers and exhaust risers crack, but that's no different than many other airplanes. The carb air box falls apart. The flap cove skins and their stabilizing brackets in the wings will crack. The flap lower skins crack at the the trailing edges, through the rivet holes. The flap rollers cut the flap support arms and can cause failures. See, there's plenty of information for the serious maintainer. I would not be at all surprised to find fatigue cracks in airplanes maintained by people who don't pay attention to service bulletins.

    As far as the 150's lower rudder bearing: there's an SB AND an AD on that regarding the rudder stops. ADs are too often overlooked.
     
  2. Sep 19, 2015 #62

    ekimneirbo

    ekimneirbo

    ekimneirbo

    Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2014
    Messages:
    1,009
    Likes Received:
    324
    Location:
    Deep South
    Dan, if someone owns an older Cessna that had been annualed say three months ago and the owner of the airplane ...after reading some of this thread...decided he had second thoughts about how thorough his
    annual inspection was...and whether all the applicable safety modifications may have been performed on his aircraft.....then what would be the best way to insure his airplane was safe?

    Where could he get a comprehensive list of things to inspect and be sure that all things had been complied with? While the owner cannot effect the upgrades or repairs, it might be of interest to perform his own
    cursory inspection to insure nothing had been overlooked. Does Cessna provide some type of updated chart on things to inspect for that is available to all A&Ps or do they just have to compile their own list and
    hope they didn't miss some Service Bullitin?
     
  3. Sep 19, 2015 #63

    djschwartz

    djschwartz

    djschwartz

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    982
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    An IA pays for a subscription to the ADs. Any reputable IA should be able to look up all the ADs and service bulletins for you aircraft. That's a required part of an annual. If you doubt the IA's efforts in this regard then I would also be suspicious of other aspects of the "annual" he performed and I would find another IA.

    Compliance should be listed in the aircraft log books. You can also order a CD of all records for the aircraft from the FAA. It's quite inexpensive and will contain digitized copies of all 337s file on that aircraft for major repairs and alterations among other things. If there is no record of compliance with an AD or SB but compliance can be verified by inspection then all that is required is for an A&P or IA to make a note in the logs that the work was done in the past by persons unknown and compliance has been verified.
     
    ekimneirbo likes this.
  4. Sep 20, 2015 #64

    TFF

    TFF

    TFF

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    3,228
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    I have worked on a couple of aircraft that had not had required ADs done or removed AD compliance by putting on junk parts. There are plenty of aircraft out there that are a mess, and they have spent the last 20 years flying patterns at their airport. $100 whipped annuals. You have to know what you are looking at. If a plane has been sitting in a hangar for 20 years, there are some AD updating for sure, some might not be cheap. Good pre-buy with someone who knows the brand is hard to beat. All the ADs are now on the FAA site; although I use a subscription, not required anymore because on FAA site. ADs are required by regulation. Service Bulletins may be required by the manufacturer, but there is no regulatory requirement to do them. The FAA does not care about them without an AD attached. They are a window to what is not in the Maintenance manual, but like it or not, up to owner to have them done or not. A&P quitting the project because wanting to do them has nothing to do with the law. 99% of owners want the relevant ones done, so not much of a problem. Cirrus even rates them from "we want you to do them, to if everyone does not do them, the FAA will make it an AD." Not doing a service bulletin may void your insurance though, because they will do anything to not pay off a claim. More legal fun is answering who is responsible for the ADs getting done? The pilot per the FARs; actually in the PPL question list. Before he flies the aircraft, he is suppose to know the status of all the ADs; it is his fault for taking off with bad AD compliance. The Mechanic or IA is responsible for doing the ADs correctly, and by being asked to do the inspection, looking into what ADs are suppose to be done. Assuming no foul play, pilot is in more responsible for bad AD compliance.
     
    ekimneirbo likes this.
  5. Sep 20, 2015 #65

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2008
    Messages:
    4,830
    Likes Received:
    2,046
     
  6. Sep 20, 2015 #66

    TFF

    TFF

    TFF

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    3,228
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    In US, owner or operator; stand corrected and caught. Where I messed up was, of course, knowing not going to be commercial and not being corporate flying. Pilot and owner not necessarily the same, for being the top for responsible for maintenance. I dont pay for a fancy service; I actually share it with someone. Nice Word forms generated. I'm not a typer, so it really takes a lot of hate out of making the list.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white