BEDE's Hidden thus Forgotten design - SUPER DEMOISELLE

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Gregory Perkins

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Jim once developed a design and began to sell the plans and immediately changed his mind and attempted to buy them all back..... except for one set. The buyer refused to sell them back.
I have them. I have not been able to scan them because they are all black with white lines.
I have tried several scan services and the scanners are overwhelmed. I am a little surprised that
Jim Bede never designed and entered the market with a 103 ultralight.
 

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TFF

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Take some nice high resolution pictures of them. It would be interesting to see them. I took pictures from my phone of the Acrosport plans at Oshkosh, and you could build from them, if one wanted to. I did something similar with some WW1 plans so I could add internal details to a RC model I was building.
 
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There used to be a way to reproduce blueprints, you know, the all blue fields with white lines. Have you contacted the air force museum to see if they have any ideas? You could call the useless EAA to see if they have a method.
Any idea what that weighed or the airfoil he used?
 

Hephaestus

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Proper print/sign shop. They'd have the proper tools and staff familiar with doing it, probably look for one downtown near the engineering offices as mentioned above - it's not uncommon to have to work with the old mimeograph blueprints.
 

Tiger Tim

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Plenty of model airplane plans of the 1930s came as a black field with white lines and lettering, I think to make them look like blueprints and thus look more serious in the eyes of the kids who were buying them. Anyways, nowadays people are having these things digitally scanned to save them and it seems to work so clearly there’s a process. Want me to ask around?
 

Lucky Dog

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Jim once developed a design and began to sell the plans and immediately changed his mind and attempted to buy them all back..... except for one set. The buyer refused to sell them back.
I have them. I have not been able to scan them because they are all black with white lines.
I have tried several scan services and the scanners are overwhelmed. I am a little surprised that
Jim Bede never designed and entered the market with a 103 ultralight.

Blueprints? They still make them.
 

Gregory Perkins

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I have been to three different commercial industrial blueprint outfits using different brand scanners that scan and reproduce drawings and blueprints and maps mostly
for the construction industry. They scan at high resolution which is 600 dpi. They do
create a digital file but the detail cannot be reasonably seen. There is an easy
procedure called the negative where you flip the digital file from black and white to
white and black... like old time photo negatives .... But the result is basically garbage.
The scanners have a degree of sensitivity that can be adjusted and played with
much like existing copy machines but it still results in expensive waste.
 

Stl.Ed

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St. Louis, MO, USA
Depending on how determined you are...

Find someone with a large format camera, and get some slide film (Ektachrome, etc,).
Set up a stand to take standard high resolution shots.
Use the processed slides as a black-and-white negative to make standard prints.
The resulting prints should be a reversal of the original, and scanners should be able to process them.
 
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Some of my AV-36 masters were like this. Staples scanned then, gave me *.PDF files that I converted to *.TIFF and then I inverted the colors using Paint.net. Convert to all black/white first.
They didn't need any more clean up than the 'normal' masters. Paint.net does a pretty good job of that too........considering it is a free download.
 

Deuelly

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I've scanned black prints with white lines and lettering many times. Usually just takes minor adjustments to the contrast. Then you can take the digital file and convert it to negative.

Brandon
 

Geraldc

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Nov 12, 2011
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nz
I use an app called simple scanner on an android phone.
You can deskew and choose different output options .
Save as a pdf or jpeg .
Here is an example from a faded print that was almost unreadable.
1655879248673.png
 

bmcj

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Try the commercial print shops. When I had my shop, I had a LARGE format 8,000 dpi drum scanner uhat would have handled those prints easily.

Those drum scanners worked great, but they really are up the hard disk space in short order when scanning at the high resolution settings.
 

Gregory Perkins

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May 25, 2019
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Atlanta
I assume the model did not fly well ?
No one knows. It could have been a business decision or a technical decision.
The magazine advertisement is dated 1965 so you have to look at the context of
other projects he was involved with at the time. You can look at Wikipedia and
see his other models ..... if anyone here is familiar with editing the Wiki articles please let me know and we can add the SuperDemosielle info and pictures. A google search for the SuperDemoiselle now turns up the info contained in this forum thread.
From the photos I have, I see an original prototype made from welded steel tubing
that was redone in bolted together alum tubing.
 

Gregory Perkins

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Atlanta
My understanding of architectural two bit document scanning. A long time ago a technology was developed to reduce a document digital image to the smallest possible digital file for the purpose of sending by fax. A file format call TIF-II was created. Every pixle in a scan was either blank ( 00 white) or ( 01 black ) This constrasts with 16, 32 and 64 bit color scans. There are also some algorithms for reducing file size that says ..... repeat 00 for x number of spaces and x lines without having to include a 00 bit to fill up the empty space. The problem with an all black background is that the tif-II files are thousands of times larger than the files with white backgrounds. It is not just file size storage that is the problem, ( no longer a problem in todays world of supersize memory chips ) but the data channels seem to be overwhemed as their data speeds (bandwidth) are insufficient to handle the amount of data being picked up by the scanner and causes an error. I want to emphasize that this is my "rough" understanding as it was explained to me by the scanner technician.
If you should ever have a modern blueprint scanned in the black and white tif-II (fax) format you will be astonished at how small the digital file will be compared to color digital file format such as JPEG. BTW, all documents in the Smithsonian and the US Patents office are kept in TIF-II format.
 
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