"Beast One" - the next generation Microjet

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Scheny

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I have prepared a short talkabout video going through some slides that I put together for my former first customer some years ago. I am a project manager, who is known to keep speaks short and down to basic points, so I was shocked that just going through the slides took that long.

I am not sure anyone outside of this community will not be interested in so much aero talk. Still, i will upload the videos on Youtube for you HBA folks.
 

BJC

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Another killer demystified. Thanks.

This summary comment from the pilot with actual experience:

It [the BD-5] is not difficult to fly nor are there unsafe or hazardous characteristics for properly trained and adequately briefed pilots.

BJC
 

Scheny

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They said the same thing about the 737Max ;). Also the Starfighter pilots used to say the same: this only happens to other pilots. 1/3rd for Starfighter and 1/2 for the BD-5 speaks a clear message...

I was trained by mostly military pilots and I had situations when they just pulled the throttle and then block it, so I couldn't put it back in. They would have watched me cope with the situation and this taught me to work in "best effort" mode. I once said: "Engine out. 2500 to go, looking for landing possibilities." After looking for 10 seconds I asked what we do if there is no good spot. He replied "then you still have the chance to die like a man"... We also did similar trainings, where (in IMC) the instructor suddenly disconnected AP, put the aircraft in an almost inverted situation and then handed over. Well, it was a challenge, but always doable, as I got used to it.

But I remember one day, where it was hot summer in a twin and the old decorated veteran suddenly pulled the right engine on the downwind. Absolutely no problem, I was super well trained (I thought). Put left engine to max, reduce flaps and continue. But then the speed slowly dropped, up to point where it would decrease even further and I had to descent. So, left engine roaring at emergency power and aircraft still descending in the thin air and the ground too near for comfort. I began trying to limit the descend and the instructor took over, putting back the second engine. He said: "Approaching Vmca. Congratulations, you almost killed us".

This one lesson taught me one single thing: you can be elite, you can be the best. But you still can be the one other guy if something goes south.
 

Vigilant1

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This one lesson taught me one single thing: you can be elite, you can be the best. But you still can be the one other guy if something goes south.
It is a tough challenge: be confident, but not complacent. Too often, folks seem to confuse "complacency" with "smugness", but they aren't the same.

In my experience, if there's a gaggle of pilots swapping opinions, frequently the most competent ones are the guys listening, not the guys talking.
 

rv6ejguy

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You are welcome: A Critique of the BD-5 Concept, Part 1 - PDFHALL.COM
This guy even flew both models.
His statement near the end says it all IMO:
"It is not difficult to fly nor are there unsafe or hazardous characteristics for properly trained and adequately briefed pilots."

Low time, non-current pilots who are not properly trained or briefed are exactly the types who end up being killed in BD-5s. You need to be on your game to safely fly one of these. Their control sensitivity, and stall characteristics are legendary. I have some customers flying them for many years and they don't have any issues with them.
 

Riggerrob

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Dear Vigilant 1,
There are four stages to the learning curve:
1. Unknown incompetence,
2. Know incompetence
3. Unknown competence
4. Known competence.
 

Vigilant1

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Dear Vigilant 1,
There are four stages to the learning curve:
1. Unknown incompetence,
2. Know incompetence
3. Unknown competence
4. Known competence.
Good as far as it goes, but I think it misses one dimension: >Who< is aware of level of competence? That's covered under Dunning-Kruger. :)
 

Victor Bravo

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So what is it exactly that an average or even slightly above average pilot would have to learn, in order to be competent in the BD-5?

I am one of those who would not automatically be afraid of it, but I have to admit I would also possibly be one of those who might be arrogant or misinformed and wreck it.

So... if I somehow had one sitting on the ramp to fly, and I could somehow set aside my arrogance, ego, and what's left of my testosterone... what would I need to be trained on?
 

jedi

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So what is it exactly that an average or even slightly above average pilot would have to learn, in order to be competent in the BD-5?

I am one of those who would not automatically be afraid of it, but I have to admit I would also possibly be one of those who might be arrogant or misinformed and wreck it.

So... if I somehow had one sitting on the ramp to fly, and I could somehow set aside my arrogance, ego, and what's left of my testosterone... what would I need to be trained on?
You need to know how to fly.

Think of the BD-5 like you would a horse. Say mom sat you on a pony and you rode around the ring. Then, years later you went to the dude ranch and did a trail ride.

Today you have tickets to a rodeo. What would you need to learn before you got on one of those horses?
 

Scheny

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For the last three weeks I was blocked by HBA, as I couldn't receive their mails. Now it's suddenly working again...

I was busy creating a working model for Flight Simulator 2020. It is a work in progress, but first goals are achieved:
BO_Blender.jpg

If you could follow on Twitter or Facebook (links below), I would be very glad. Doesn't cost you anything, but a good motivator for me.
 
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DangerZone

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Like any aircraft, fly it by the numbers and stalls are not something you worry about. Pulling G at low speeds is asking for trouble in almost any aircraft. Why would any competent and thinking pilot be doing that?
Try to fly the Piper Supercub and you will see how amazingly fun it is to pull Gs at low speeds... :)
 

rv6ejguy

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If you've done any tail chasing with sustained turn rates and G, you'll know that speed is quickly depleted even at full power in the types of planes most of us here fly. Keep pulling and you're on your way to a stall. Do this down low in a plane with unfriendly stall characteristics and you could easily become a statistic.
 

Scheny

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Looking good. But why not for X-plane? It could be more useful as a predictive model.
MSFS 2020 has a new system similar to X-Plane. They copied all good stuff from all sims. It will calculate the lift vectors on wings, fuselage etc. and then applies the lift and drag curves, so that the speeds are matching. And afterwards you can additionally add some tweaking parameters to cover for corner cases.

In addition, Asobo/Microsoft created a Garmin G3X, GMC507 etc that I will use and also the scenery is the best if used without costly Addons.
 

Pops

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Horst Malliga's aircraft number 4, built from a supersonic capable drop fuel tank for fighter jets.


The difference is between do you go to the Tiger and hit it until it once bites, or do you stay behind the bars, try to be outside reach and still get bitten?

I earn my money for a living with car development, they also have an envelope. Back in the days, an awful lot had accidents when they were just driving on a straight road. And don't think this is not happening to you, or anymore. If you look at the Audi TT, it got an integrated spoiler added as the rear portion is creating uplift. The car has really good race track characteristics, as everything is weighed to have the perfect balance. But, when the car gets unstable due to a lighter rear (aerodynamically lighter), it gets unstable so quickly, that not even their best testpilots could notice it in time and it was unrecoverable.

So, bottom line: all Audi TT and now also all similar cars like Porsche's have an integrated spoiler.
VW Bug will lift off at high speed. Built several very fast VW's . Speedometer is driven off the left front wheel. When at high speed I looked down and the needle was on Zero. Front was just on the edge of coming up. Took a while for my heart to slow down. Needs as much negative angle as possible and a large spoiler to keep the rear on the ground.

Added-- Friend of mine has a Chevy 383 on a cut down Chevy S-10 frame in a 1973 VW Bug Conv. I built a 1968 VW Bug with a 215 ci , aluminum block V-8 on a homemade box frame. Tread lightly.
 
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