Basic Woodworking Book for New Builders?

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MadProfessor8138

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Topaz....I'll put in a good word for you at the next family meeting....you're good people in our book.
Consider yourself "protected" from here on in.
The only thing you should be afraid of is Miie Lindell from the My Pillow commercial......that dude gives me the creeps.....lmao

Kevin Garlic
 
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This is a high quality facsimile of Aircraft Woodwork by Colonel Rollen H. Drake, originally published in 1946. This book contains all the information and instruction needed to fulfill the woodwork requirements for an aircraft mechanic's license in 1946. Its detailed information on every aspect of aircraft woodwork will also make the book useful for reference by woodworkers on the job. It is clearly written in non-technical language which anyone can understand. There is much useful data on the different types of woods, their characteristics, their physical structure, properties and uses, ways in which they are cut and seasoned, the specific requirements in strength, moisture content, weight, grain, etc., for different aircraft parts, and the defects which the woodworker must watch for in the selection of wood for each job. There are equally full and specific details about the various types of glues used in woodwork and the techniques of application; about joints and laminations; and about the various types of finishes required on the wood and fabric parts of the aircraft, how they are applied, and how they are removed. The common tools and machines the aircraft woodworker uses are illustrated and the techniques in the skilled use of each tool is explained. There are helpful chapters on blueprint reading and on the safety precautions necessary in woodwork. The last half of the book contains nearly 100 problems which show each step in typical aircraft woodwork jobs, both construction and repair. They illustrate work on all of the wood structures and the fabric or plywood covered parts of an aircraft. The book is illustrated with about 225 detailed drawings and photographs, which graphically show all the materials, tools, and techniques described in the text. There are also useful tables of data on such matters as the allowable and inallowable defects in woods for the various aircraft parts, the amounts of pressure needed in gluing various parts, bending radii of plywoods, the classification of woods by strength, weight, moisture content, specific gravity, etc.

I have just ordered it for interest - so no comments other than it exists :)
 
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Early aeroplanes were simple machines by the high tech standards of today, being mainly constructed from wood and cloth. This simple construction, though dangerous for the aviator, was a joy for the woodworker. Many planes of this era have rotted or been destroyed. Including an introductory essay on woodworking, this is the perfect guide for anybody interested early aviation or an amateur carpenter wishing to restore or repair aeroplanes of a bygone age.

I have just ordered it for interest - so no comments other than it exists
 

lr27

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I poked around a bit in Google Books and Amazon and found what's supposed to be a facsimile of the book. If I was on my PC instead of my Stoopidfone (R), I'd give you a link. Also ran across a publication of the same name by the War Department from the early 1940's. If I recall correctly, you can read it on Google Books. I'll bet the so called Magic NACA Archive has something good, too. Maybe even the NTRS server, though you will have to sift through more listings.
 

BJC

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The EAA has one from 50 or 60 years ago. There are some newer ones, too.
Here is the booklet that I was referring to:
6EF4436A-3FFF-4344-AC26-682B4BAB8374.jpeg
It is outdated wrt adhesives. That can easily be dealt with by penciling in “newer acceptable adhesives are FPL-16A and T-88.” It was published in 1964, and doesn’t seem to be available today.

On the subject of “how to”, the booklet on the left in the photo explains how to build a tube and fabric airplane.


BJC
 

TFF

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The Acrosport one is a rare bird. It was being sold through Acrosport but who knows now. They needed to have more made.
 

Wanttaja

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BTW, EAA recently made their "Building the Wood Airplane" book available for free download to EAA members:


It is NOT the same book as Ken posted about....It's mostly Pete Bowers' articles on building the Fly Baby.

Ron Wanttaja
 

sigrana

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This is a high quality facsimile of Aircraft Woodwork by Colonel Rollen H. Drake, originally published in 1946. This book contains all the information and instruction needed to fulfill the woodwork requirements for an aircraft mechanic's license in 1946. Its detailed information on every aspect of aircraft woodwork will also make the book useful for reference by woodworkers on the job. It is clearly written in non-technical language which anyone can understand. There is much useful data on the different types of woods, their characteristics, their physical structure, properties and uses, ways in which they are cut and seasoned, the specific requirements in strength, moisture content, weight, grain, etc., for different aircraft parts, and the defects which the woodworker must watch for in the selection of wood for each job. There are equally full and specific details about the various types of glues used in woodwork and the techniques of application; about joints and laminations; and about the various types of finishes required on the wood and fabric parts of the aircraft, how they are applied, and how they are removed. The common tools and machines the aircraft woodworker uses are illustrated and the techniques in the skilled use of each tool is explained. There are helpful chapters on blueprint reading and on the safety precautions necessary in woodwork. The last half of the book contains nearly 100 problems which show each step in typical aircraft woodwork jobs, both construction and repair. They illustrate work on all of the wood structures and the fabric or plywood covered parts of an aircraft. The book is illustrated with about 225 detailed drawings and photographs, which graphically show all the materials, tools, and techniques described in the text. There are also useful tables of data on such matters as the allowable and inallowable defects in woods for the various aircraft parts, the amounts of pressure needed in gluing various parts, bending radii of plywoods, the classification of woods by strength, weight, moisture content, specific gravity, etc.

I have just ordered it for interest - so no comments other than it exists :)


This is a high quality facsimile of Aircraft Woodwork by Colonel Rollen H. Drake, originally published in 1946. This book contains all the information and instruction needed to fulfill the woodwork requirements for an aircraft mechanic's license in 1946. Its detailed information on every aspect of aircraft woodwork will also make the book useful for reference by woodworkers on the job. It is clearly written in non-technical language which anyone can understand. There is much useful data on the different types of woods, their characteristics, their physical structure, properties and uses, ways in which they are cut and seasoned, the specific requirements in strength, moisture content, weight, grain, etc., for different aircraft parts, and the defects which the woodworker must watch for in the selection of wood for each job. There are equally full and specific details about the various types of glues used in woodwork and the techniques of application; about joints and laminations; and about the various types of finishes required on the wood and fabric parts of the aircraft, how they are applied, and how they are removed. The common tools and machines the aircraft woodworker uses are illustrated and the techniques in the skilled use of each tool is explained. There are helpful chapters on blueprint reading and on the safety precautions necessary in woodwork. The last half of the book contains nearly 100 problems which show each step in typical aircraft woodwork jobs, both construction and repair. They illustrate work on all of the wood structures and the fabric or plywood covered parts of an aircraft. The book is illustrated with about 225 detailed drawings and photographs, which graphically show all the materials, tools, and techniques described in the text. There are also useful tables of data on such matters as the allowable and inallowable defects in woods for the various aircraft parts, the amounts of pressure needed in gluing various parts, bending radii of plywoods, the classification of woods by strength, weight, moisture content, specific gravity, etc.

I have just ordered it for interest - so no comments other than it exists :)
I have it and it is a very nice book. I would also recommend to download the
ANC-19 BULLETIN Wood Aircraft - Inspection and Fabrication from
It is an old one but still very useful.
 

Saville

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Apr 28, 2014
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Boston Ma
archive.org has a lot of out pf print books you can download for free.

For example there's this:

TM 1-414 Aircraft Woodwork 1942-12-22
 
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Apr 20, 2019
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I have the Drake book, and I wouldn't bother. I read it, and some of the information was valuable, I suppose, but the format is for classroom work preparing for maintaining wood structures in manufactured aircraft. It's out-of-date and partly inapplicable to what we are doing.
 
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