BABY BENOIST

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JRC

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Dec 28, 2020
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20
3 Members of EAA.org Chapter 1660 KTPF are in the process of design-build a scaled-down St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat I\line inc. 1913 Benoist Flying boat. The world first scheduled airliner.


Our version - the “ BABY BENOIST “ will be Epowered, Tandem design using an aircraft FLOAT design as the fuselage to have Gunwales out-would for more cockpit with.


We need help placin the centerline main retractable gear well, the best location for the step and the location of the Wings center of lift…FMI Tampa neil 813-784-4669
 

BJC

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Oct 7, 2013
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97FL, Florida, USA
Nice.

Some friends from long ago built and flew the replica that now hangs in the St. Pete International lobby.


BJC
 

Riggerrob

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Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Messages
2,252
Location
Canada
Typical seaplanes mount their hydrodynamic step 17 degrees aft of the center-of gravity.
Main wheels are typically mounted 15 to 17 degrees forward of the the center-of-gravity.
Remember to level the airplane and weigh it in flight configuration to ensure that you include both the horizontal location and vertical location of the center-of-gravity.
If you are still in the early stages of design and construction, I suggest that you build all the flying surfaces and measure their center of gravity. also weight the engine, prop, instruments, sample struts, etc. and do rough weight-and-balance calculations before finalizing the fuselage construction.
One beauty about strut-braced construction is that you can still swing the wing and engine location - to finalize balance - even after most of the airframe components are completed. You may even be able to finalize the tail, hull, landing gear and lower wing positions and just adjust the top wings' struts after a preliminary W & W.
When completed, the gross weight, center-of-gravity should be at about 25 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. M.A.C. is easy calculate on constant-chord wings, just remember to factor any stagger (top wing forward or aft of lower wing.)
 
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