Aviation Trivia

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jedi

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Why do so many of the midwestern US universities own airports?

How much did the US government pay for a Curtis JN-4 Jenny?

Where did the joystick get it's name? Don't believe Google which says "The joystick obviously got it's name from it's shape and location in the cockpit of early aircraft. It was a stick that stuck up between the legs of the mostly male pilots and was grasped by the hand. Joysticks were a brand of cigarette that were very long and intended to be cut into smaller pieces."
 

Deuelly

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Why is an F-16 flying formation with me, and why is the pilot pointing toward the ground?

Brandon
 

jedi

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Floyd Bennett Field? Or was that the first control tower?
Floyd Bennett Field? Not first paved runway.

First paved runway also had the first airport hotel for overnight travelers.

Edit: The hotel is the only facility that remains to this day. If the flying car is ever successful it could be a location for the $1,000 hamburger run.
 
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Pops

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OK, I'm ready for the answer. :)
 

TFF

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Can say he wasn’t involved with waterfowl, kind of, but not the sphere of his day job.
 

jedi

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OK, I'm ready for the answer. :)
Like many airports the Ford Airport in Dearborn Michigan has been converted to a "higher use" and no longer functions as an airport. It was an active facility in the hay days of the Ford Tri-motor and saw many firsts as noted below. The "airport hotel" is the only facility related to the airport that remained functional into the 21 century and continues as the Dearborn Inn. Historic Michigan Landmark | The Dearborn Inn, A Marriott Hotel

Reference: Ford Airport (Dearborn) - Wikipedia

Ford Airport in Dearborn, Michigan, United States, was one of the first modern airports in the world. It operated from 1924 to 1947. The site is now part of Ford Motor Company's Dearborn Proving Ground.[1] The airport was about 360 acres (150 ha) in size.[2]

This airport saw many world and U.S. "firsts": the first U.S. airport hotel, the first concrete runways, first U.S. scheduled passenger service, first contracted airmail service, first radio control for a commercial flight, first U.S. passenger terminal.[3] The buildings were designed by architect Albert Kahn and are considered to have greatly influenced the design of airports throughout the U.S.[4] The original aircraft facilities were in use as part of the Ford testing facilities at the proving ground, however the original (greatly modified) passenger terminal was demolished in 1961, and the remaining hangar, used as an experimental engine test facility since the late 1940s was demolished in 2018. Only The Dearborn Inn, a hotel that was built across the road to serve the airport, remains.

and highly recommended


More info on the Tri-motor at:

 
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wsimpso1

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Ford Airport, Dearborn MI, now the Dearborn Proving Grounds of Ford Motor Company.

The paving was reputedly commenced on orders from Henry Ford himself, after pilots attending the Ford Air Tour referred to the airport as Ford Lake.

Ford Motor Company's flight division was also reputedly an inventor of the AN Radio Ranges to allow more regular flights between Ford company sites.
 
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wsimpso1

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What is a four course range?

Who developed the idea and where was the first application installed?
Also known as an AN range, it was an early radio navigation aid designed to not just allow a pilot to home to the station, but to navigate onto and travel along one of four courses centered on the aid. Story is that Ford Motor Company's flight division was having flights shut down way too often, and Henry himself directed his guys to invent something. A series of these made trips between Dearborn and Chicago (and other sites) much more reliably flown.
 

wsimpso1

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Floyd Bennett Field? Not first paved runway.

First paved runway also had the first airport hotel for overnight travelers.

Edit: The hotel is the only facility that remains to this day. If the flying car is ever successful it could be a location for the $1,000 hamburger run.
Wrong, the Ford Airport in Dearborn is still there, and while closed, it is very recognizable as an airport from the air. It is now Ford Motor Company's Dearborn Proving Ground.


The building marked Ford Dearborn Development Center still had masonry placards identifying the building as Stout Metal Airplane Company in 2008, the last time I was over there on business.
 
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N804RV

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Next trivia. How was the airfoil is used on the Ford Tri-motor developed?

I doubt there is an "offiical answer" to this question.
I thought the wing on the Tin Goose was based on the Fokker tri motor wing design.
 

jedi

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Knute Rockne crash in '31.
Yes! For general interest lets include a reference if you look up the answer on the internet so readers can get as much detail as they want. One reference is posted below. If any additional details of the crash are found, please add the the data here. I suspect there is an accident report, news articles, etc.

Fokker F.VII - Wikipedia

"the popularity of the Fokker quickly waned after the 1931 crash of a Transcontinental & Western Air Fokker F.10, which resulted in the death of Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne. The investigation revealed problems with the Fokker's plywood-laminate construction, resulting in a temporary ban from commercial flights, more stringent maintenance requirements, and a shift to all-metal aircraft such as the similar Ford Trimotor and later Boeing 247 and Douglas DC-2.[3] "

FWIW - My local NBC channel 13 carries reruns of "The Waltons". In yesterday's episode young reporter John Boy was able to cover the arrival of the Hindenburg at Lakehurst, New Jersey on its 1936 arrival with 96 passengers and crew. The story was nicely done and difficult to write. More original footage of the operation in one sitting than I can remember ever seeing. Trivia - The Hindenburg had 16 gas bags and appeared to be tail heavy on the final landing indicating a possible leak from an aft gas bag.


This and many other videos are available thanks to modern computers and the internet. Today's kids do not need school to learn history.

Readers please carry on! I am sure there is a wealth of knowledge within the HBA supporters and untapped internet sources if readers have the guidance to find it. Anybody want to start a Charles Lindbergh thread? Did Charles Lindbergh live in Detroit or St Louis? Where, When?
 
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