Artificial Horzion

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
7,079
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
What's wrong with the actual horizon such that you need an artificial one?

Forgive the harshness of this comment, no disrespect or harm intended, but I am speaking the truth. You have no business whatsoever learning, thinking about, or using an artificial horizon, gyroscopic instruments, even the compass... until you have already learned to fly the airplane based on seeing what is outside the airplane with your eyes and the seat of your pants.

Did you learn to use the stereo and the air conditioning and the sunroof on a car before you learned how to safely and confidently drive the car using the steering wheel, brake pedal, and gas pedal?
 

wsimpso1

Super Moderator
Staff member
Log Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2003
Messages
6,531
Location
Saline Michigan
I was wondering how many of you fly in planes that don't have artificial horizons? how diffficult it it to learn to fly without one?
The gadget is a distraction from looking outside and seeing the real horizon. Some say you can hold bank and pitch more accurately with a real horizon, others with the instrument. You will figure out your own references looking forward...

IFR was done needle, ball, and airspeed for a while before adding the attitude and heading gyros and powering them differently than the turn needle. The redundancy makes the failure of one instrument or power source a survivable event. My CFII used to tell me that I fly better when she covered my attitude and heading gyros - she figured I had less things to keep up with then...

You will do fine.

Billski
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,893
Location
USA.
Cats and flying. Warning true story.

Old friend and also one of my old flight instructors was Sam. Sam was a civilian flight instructor for the Army Air Corps teaching primary students at Roanoke, Va in WW-2 in PT-17's. Had scars to prove it. Said those %*%*%*% students were always trying to kill him. Sam was a Railroad detective in the southern half of WV. Sam was big and all muscle and fit for the job. Talked like a drunken sailor and had a heart of gold. Didn't come any better than Sam.
Sam had built 2 Baby Aces ( I helped on the last one) and owned a Piper Tri-Pacer and a 150 HP, Cessna 150. One day a local old lady called and ask Sam to fly her cat to WY. Couldn't send it by airlines because they said it had to be in a cage and putting a cat in a cage is cruel. Sam had a son living in WY, so he took the job and promised that the cat would not be in a cage and free in the cabin of the Tri-Pacer. Remember, the Tri-Pacer has a vent window on the side window by the left seat. Don't forget. Sam picked the cat up and went to Mallory airport and took off for Wy. All is fine. Couple hours latter, at I think, 8500 ft, all of a sudden the cat woke up on the back seat and gave out a squall and jumped on the rear seat back and leaped forward and landed on Sam's upper back and hung on with all of his claws and kept on squalling and digging. Sam said he had a ***** ***** ***** %*%*%*%* ***** %%%%%% a time stuffing the cat out the side vent window while trying to fly the airplane. Then he had to land and go to a hospital to get his back and arms patched up. Sam was ask many times about what he told the old lady. He always said, " its none of your ****** ****** ****** business ".

I have a question. If a cat falls from over 8K' will it still land on its feet ?
 

Tornado Flyer

Active Member
Joined
May 19, 2015
Messages
35
Location
Beech Bluff, TN USA
You should get to know the plane you are flying well enough that you could fly with NO instruments. You never know when they will fail. I once took off forgetting to remove the pitot cover. Yeah, checklist, I know. The cover was pretty new. Anyway, I'm glad I knew my plane well enough to come around and land with no incident.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,893
Location
USA.
I take the fifth . How about leaving the oil cap on top of the battery box in a C-172. Not me :)
 

Mike Stewart

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2010
Messages
67
Location
San Diego, CA
> "I do recommend de-clawing the artificial AH first"

I work with feral cats and would counter that recommendation. De-clawing is about the cruelest thing you can do to a cat. Just imagine having your fingernails pulled out. They're in pain for the rest of their lives. Watch the way a de-clawed cat walks - hunched up in an attempt to relieve their front paws of pressure since it hurts to walk. Their claws are far more important to the life of a cat than is our fingernails.

Nice picture.
 

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5,251
I hope not. They should never have replaced the needle and ball with the turn coordinator.


BJC
I preferred the turn coordinator for partial-panel IFR flying. It's easier to hit the rate one turn immediately since the coordinator responds to bank as well as yaw. The turn-and-bank indicator responds only to yaw, so it's easier to overshoot the bank angle.
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
7,079
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
How about leaving the oil cap on top of the battery box in a C-172. Not me :)
How about a brain-dead moron taking off in a 172 with both fuel caps not re-installed after refueling, and having somebody call out on the Unicom that the 172 climbing out is leaving a huge vapor trail behind it?

Ain't no brain-dead morons like that around here... no sir!
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,893
Location
USA.
How about a brain-dead moron taking off in a 172 with both fuel caps not re-installed after refueling, and having somebody call out on the Unicom that the 172 climbing out is leaving a huge vapor trail behind it?

Ain't no brain-dead morons like that around here... no sir!

Cessna designed the straight tail 172 with a large oil door on the cowl and positioned the battery box where the top of the box is a good place to place the oil cap with checking the oil. They even designed it so the cap doesn't fall off when going around the pattern. They think of everything.
 

Vigilant1

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
4,753
Location
US
How about a brain-dead moron taking off in a 172 with both fuel caps not re-installed after refueling, and having somebody call out on the Unicom that the 172 climbing out is leaving a huge vapor trail behind it?

Ain't no brain-dead morons like that around here... no sir!
I can't imagine the California Air Resources Board star chamber that would result.
 

BoKu

Pundit
HBA Supporter
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
2,576
Location
Western US
The last time I used an AH much I was about 10 years old and couldn't see the real horizon over the glareshield.
 

Jerry Lytle

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2014
Messages
358
Location
Newport, Oregon
I misplaced the dipstick in our partnered 170. Thinking I had dropped it someplace over the mountains I went to the Cessna dealer and ordered a new one. Cessna dealers do not prioratize small orders. Several weeks went by no dipstick. When first discovering the loss I knew the oil level and used a coat hanger to check it. My partners weren't flying much at the time so I didn't have to answer to them and it was winter. Getting frustrated with the Cessna dealer I decide to fly up to an airplane salvage yard and see if I could talk them out of one.
On preflight what did I see? the dipstick was laying on top of the battery box. It had many free air miles on it
I made up a story to tell the Cessna dealer why I was cancelling. The counter man said "No problem, we haven't sent the order off.'
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,893
Location
USA.
I misplaced the dipstick in our partnered 170. Thinking I had dropped it someplace over the mountains I went to the Cessna dealer and ordered a new one. Cessna dealers do not prioratize small orders. Several weeks went by no dipstick. When first discovering the loss I knew the oil level and used a coat hanger to check it. My partners weren't flying much at the time so I didn't have to answer to them and it was winter. Getting frustrated with the Cessna dealer I decide to fly up to an airplane salvage yard and see if I could talk them out of one.
On preflight what did I see? the dipstick was laying on top of the battery box. It had many free air miles on it
I made up a story to tell the Cessna dealer why I was cancelling. The counter man said "No problem, we haven't sent the order off.'
Aren't Cessna engineers great or what. Nice flat place to put things.
 

103

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 2, 2015
Messages
196
Location
Wauwatosa WI
Lot of pilots today don't know the idiosyncrasies of a compass.

Ron---- Your fun meter is pegged. :)
I would prioritize a fun meter over a Artificial Horizon. That said if I wander into clouds I can flip Avare over to a Stratofier app and use my Stratux AHRS gyros to do a 180 or whatever is needed to get clear of clouds again. 1st order of business is to stay clear of clouds!

Yes I know carb heat first but it is lacking a permanently pegged FUN METER ...panel perfection is but one step away!
 
Last edited:
2
Top