Anyone building Airdrome Aeroplanes Morane-Saulnier Type LA (75% Scale)

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TFF

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Was the nose the same proportion to the original Eindecker? Engine yours was designed for? Once these things get shrunk and moved around, most designers try to tame the WW1 out. Most didn’t have elevator trim to add to it. I am one of the biggest fans of WW1 planes.
 

Wanttaja

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Was the nose the same proportion to the original Eindecker? Engine yours was designed for? Once these things get shrunk and moved around, most designers try to tame the WW1 out. Most didn’t have elevator trim to add to it. I am one of the biggest fans of WW1 planes.
Most Fly Babies don't have elevator trim, either...beyond a fixed tab.

Ron Wanttaja
 

radfordc

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Was the nose the same proportion to the original Eindecker? Engine yours was designed for? Once these things get shrunk and moved around, most designers try to tame the WW1 out. Most didn’t have elevator trim to add to it. I am one of the biggest fans of WW1 planes.
I doubt the proportions are "true scale". The AA Eindecker was designed for a 503 non-electric start. Stab is full flying with a fixed trim tab.
 

rc-rotorhead

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No, the AA Eindecker is not true scale, but close enough (if you squint). The overall length, wingspan and chord are roughly 3/4 scale, but the nose is long and the tail is short along with larger tail surfaces. The narrow fuselage was also massaged to fit a full-sized pilot. I think it would look much better proportioned if the tailfeathers were built as a Moraine Saulnier H, or maybe even a Finnish Thulin KA (as ailerons were fitted to those).
 

radfordc

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The overall length, wingspan and chord are roughly 3/4 scale, but the nose is long and the tail is short along with larger tail surfaces. The narrow fuselage was also massaged to fit a full-sized pilot..
My E-III started as a 3/4 scale. At that size the wing area is too small for hefty pilots. Robert weighed 150 lbs when he designed it and that's about what you need to be to enjoy it. I'm not 160....not even close. My plane now has 7/8 scale wings. I wish the whole plane was 7/8 scale with a VW engine as I think this would be a "sweet spot" for size and power. I don't think I would fit a Moraine either. You have to be somewhat spry to get in and out.
 

TFF

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I always park WW1 aviation in a special category. I would want a replica. I come from the RC world of trying to build competition scale planes. Splitting looks and function is hard to me on certain levels. I am also a very average regular pilot who does not need to be flying most real WW1 replicas. Discussion of technical data has nothing to do with my appreciation of someone building their dream plane, perfect replica or not.

Your 3/4 with 7/8 wings has two discussions, how the proportions are needed to be different from the original, and how great an achievement it was to build it. It depends on how the discussion is framed. When someone says it’s a perfect copy, my model mind goes, really. I’m use to counting rivets. I put real rib stitching on my Sopwith Camel model. I rib stitched my real airplane so I know it’s not for show. For me, a plane has to fly good. Flies good, it’s safe. If I build a replica, I don’t want it to look like a toy, though. The dilemma. Some work better than others.
 

Rhino

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rasco

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Thanks everyone for help. It seems however there are not many other builders except for Sharon and Dick Starks :(
 
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