Quantcast

Any Tailwind owners / pilots?

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

mcrae0104

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
3,647
When I was about 165 pounds and 6’ 2”, I flew a C-85 powered W-8 with the 6’ 3” 200 pound builder. It was tight, but so were most airplanes of that era.


BJC
Apologies for going a bit off topic..

BJC, how does the Sportsman fit you? Which planes have you found to be adequate for your frame? Any that came up short but you liked them anyway (Cassutt maybe)?
 

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
12,505
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
The Sportsman is the most comfortable vehicle of any type that I have ridden in. That includes all the US luxury cars, the German Luxury cars, the Japanese luxury cars, my trucks, boats. and motorcycles.

It is roomy; 44" wide at the hips, and 46 " wide at the shoulders. It fits me very well, but I don't know how well it would fit a shorter pilot, because the seat is fixed, and the seat back moves forward and aft for adjustment. A 6' 7" pilot tested it, and fit in, but said that he would like more head room. If I stay in any one seated or reclined position for any time, my legs are a problem. The Sportsman causes the least problem.

I fit in the RV-7 with a slider, but an RV-6 that I was interested in lacked head room with a slider.

I flew a Cassutt some when I was about 160 pounds. I could not get my legs under the spar without holding myself up with my hands on the longerons, turning sideways, and sliding my legs in. Pulling my legs straight back once bent my knees backwards, and severely bruised them from above my knees to about mid-shin.

I don't like the back seat of a Pitts S-2A or B. The instrument panel is right in my face. The S-1S is actually fairly roomy, once seated. It would be really tight leg length wise for someone taller with a back pack parachute.

A standard, plans-built Hatz has diagonal tubes that are in the way to the point that I declined to fly the airplane.

The T-18 is short and narrow, as was John Thorp. The stretched, wider versions looks to be better, bur I haven't been in one.

IIRC, the Thatcher CX-4 fit, but that was just a cockpit check on the ground the first year that it was at Sun n Fun.

The Midget Mustang that I sat in was built by a big guy, and was reasonably comfortable.

The Glasair Super II S is like sitting in a recliner, and I find it very comfortable. Some do not like the seat back, which is reclined at 30 degrees. The G-I cockpit is narrower and not as tall, but still on a par with most factory singles.


BJC
 

Doran Jaffas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2019
Messages
315
It's funny, but people used to think my Hiperbipe was a Tailwind. I never could figure that one out, but that biplane TW sure look like a HB at first glance.
I contacted Ryan of Chapter 14. According to him..the center of lift wasn't correct and the airplane did not fly well. I plan to build another set of wings for a winter project? and do some research regarding the placement.
 

David Lewis

Active Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
31
Location
Longwood FL
The Sportsman is the most comfortable vehicle of any type that I have ridden in. That includes all the US luxury cars, the German Luxury cars, the Japanese luxury cars, my trucks, boats. and motorcycles.
Why would you say that is? Your analysis, please.

I have wondered if the seat is like a chair (i.e. your lower legs are almost vertical) then it would be more comfortable -- similar to a captain's chair in a van. Also, if the cabin floor is kept unobstructed, you'd have room to shift your feet when not working the rudder pedals.
 

Attachments

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
12,505
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
Why would you say that is? Your analysis, please.
My body told me after spending considerable time in each of the seats that I mentioned.

If you want a scientific analysis, an integral of the sum of the intensity of the pressures on my body parts in contact with the seats produced a result of 42.


BJC
 

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
12,505
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
I have wondered if the seat is like a chair (i.e. your lower legs are almost vertical) then it would be more comfortable -- similar to a captain's chair in a van.
That is what Van claims, but I really like the reclined seating in the Glasair. I don’t have enough time flying a Glasair to compare it to the Sportsman.

The Sportsman is fairly upright, with lower legs extended at about 45 degrees to horizontal.


BJC
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
8,420
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
I am anything but a trained test pilot, but I learned a neat trick or two flying R/C model airplanes that I now still use on any full-size airplane test flight where an engine problem is a possibility.

I take off and immediately turn 30-45 degrees to the right after accelerating to a fairly fast climb. After three or four seconds I start a gentle banked turn to the left. In the event of a power loss I'm already established in the turn back to the runway, and because I'm offset to the right of the runway centerline it doesn't have to be a tight high bank turn to get back. It's a shallower, less spin-prone turn.

Looking at the wild maneuver the Tailwind does in the OP's video makes me cringe. He turns through 240 degrees one way (left turn) and then has to reverse to a 60 degree right turn to get lined up on the runway. That pilot was a good enough stick to not spin out of either of those turns, but the odds were against him/her.

I also do not climb steeply until I have enough altitude to do something. A steep climb can easily trigger a fuel flow problem when the vertical distance between the carburetor and the fuel tank becomes less. If a fuel starvation incident is trying to happen, raising the nose to a best angle climb can trigger that reduction in fuel flow. A loss of power just as you are climbing steeply off the end of the runway is the worst possible situation. I'd much rather have a 100-200 FPM climb rate with just enough fuel flow to keep it running. After I get high enough on downwind, then I can see whether it will keep running with the nose high.
 
Last edited:

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
12,505
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
I don;t understand why he came in so fast. Throttle control issues?
I’ve previously posted about practicing the “impossible turn”, and being way too fast the first time that I did one in my then-new Sportsman from the same (minimum) altitude that I had used in my A152. I now apply full flaps and a full rudder slip as soon as I’m close to wings-level out of the turn.
I take off and immediately turn 30-45 degrees to the right after accelerating to a fairly fast climb. After three or four seconds I start a gentle banked turn to the left. In the event of a power loss I'm already established in the turn back to the runway, and because I'm offset to the right of the runway centerline it doesn't have to be a tight high bank turn to get back. It's a shallower, less spin-prone turn.
I did something similar for decades, then stopped when I moved to a residential airpark. I have resumed my practice, even though it means flying over residences. (They moved to an airpark, and elected to live beside a runway.)

On takeoff, as soon as I can turn without running into something, I turn right, if no crosswind component, or downwind it there is a crosswind component. That sets me up for a turn into the wind if I elect to turn back. The radius of the turn will be smaller that way.

I’ll reiterate: if anyone has thoughts about attempting a turn back on takeoff, practice your technique at altitude, perfect it, then gradually practice at lower and lower altitudes until you reach your minimum altitude. A windshield full of trees with the nose down and the wings at a 60 degree bank at 200 feet looks very different that it does at higher altitudes.


BJC
 

wally

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2004
Messages
930
Location
southwest TN.
New to me W10. It has a Mazda rotary and Ross re-drive. I haven’t flown it yet. I had to put wings back on after trailering from TX. The hangar is an hour away and keeping 3 grandkids has slowed things down. It has about 200 hours on it.
Wally
Yesterday my friend Wally (same name) flew my W10. He liked it. The Mazda ran fine and was fairly quiet. He said it rolled out straight on both landings. There are lots of things that I want to clean up like the instrument panel and wiring. Looking forward to flying it when I get my flight review signed off. Really glad to see it fly!
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,172
Location
Memphis, TN
I think the impossible turn plane had the engine catch. Diving for the runway and then having the engine catch, it’s going to scream in. Trying not to go in the road too.

Tell us about the Mazda Tailwind. I know a couple have been built. I think one got parted out.
 

Doran Jaffas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2019
Messages
315
Please remember to check for downwind traffic before executing even a slight right turn out unless a real emergency has taken place. At least here in the states where most traffic patterns are left hand.
Also ( I do this with every airplane I've owned ) one can go to altitude and practice the 270 to verify altitude loss. You as the pilot in that situation do not have to be lined up with the runway on most general aviation airports. A landing in the airport area even if not on the runway at least allows personnel quicker access to you if help is needed.
Just my .02 worth.
 

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
12,505
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
When I was about 165 pounds and 6’ 2”, I flew a C-85 powered W-8 ...
Without prompting, a friend just sent this photo, circa 1973, of the W-8, then owned by another friend (in the photo). The owner built about 6 HBA, including an EAA Biplane, a Cassutt, and a Breezy.Tailwind.JPG


BJC
 

rv7charlie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
Messages
1,250
Location
Jackson
Wally, Doran,

Stay in touch. I'm at Slobovia Outernational (MS71) near Jackson MS, and we hold rotary/alt engine gatherings periodically down here. With the Covid mess it will be a while, but as soon as it's safe we'll be planning another. We usually have 4 or 5 rotary powered planes show up, along with multiple guys who are 'in process'. My Renesis powered RV7 is about to have its wings/tail installed.

Thjakits, I've got a copy of the Olds conversion plans. Looked really intimidating when I bought them about 30 years ago (is a personal note from Steve worth anything?), but don't look that bad after getting a little building experience.

Charlie
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,172
Location
Memphis, TN
One of the Olds engines is on display at Oshkosh. I believe he had two. It doesn’t look too bad. Turning it upside down probably took more work than the prop connection. They are relatively light. Wittman used a smaller prop to keep the crank happy compared to what an equal Lycoming would use. It might have been one that started life on a O-200. The 215 was stroked to something around 243 I think. The question, at least at the time, are you replacing a O-200 or a O-290? I have dragged around a Olds core forever.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
8,800
Location
USA.
If I remember correctly, the 1962 Buick 215 ci aluminum block V-8 in my 1968 VW Bug was about 50 lbs heavier than the stock 1600 cc VW engine as removed. Yes, they are relatively light weight for a V-8.
 
Top