Anti-ice for experimental.

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BJC

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How does a Floridian know this? It is a rhetorical question.
Lets make it a real question. I grew up in Georgia, and later lived on a Mountain in Tennessee, where ice storms in early Spring are the norm. I’m familiar with chains. But not Kevlar chains. Once drove down Signal Mountain, through Atlanta, to Milledgeville Ga the morning after an ice storm. I saw exactly two other moving vehicles on that 200 + mile trip.


BJC
 

jedi

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Lets make it a real question. I grew up in Georgia, and later lived on a Mountain in Tennessee, where ice storms in early Spring are the norm. I’m familiar with chains. But not Kevlar chains. Once drove down Signal Mountain, through Atlanta, to Milledgeville Ga the morning after an ice storm. I saw exactly two other moving vehicles on that 200 + mile trip.


BJC
OK, but then let’s give the real answer.

We are both old farts!

:):pilot:

It is nice to be able to remember the good old days!

Ask me how I know!
 
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jedi

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BJC et. al.

Yea, but at least we’re not stupid.

You left George and Tennessee and I left Michigan.

Can’t say that for many folks here.

Problem is I am still stuck here in WA with students and homework while my wife is in AZ with grandkids where they have the best weather in the US from now till March.
 

8davebarker

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Their is a an alternative to heat and or chemical de-icing,
about 15 years ago I equipped my Mooney 231 with a 2” wide Kapton printed circuit strip along the leading edge of the wing. (See photo ) This had interdigited gold plated fingers. By applying ~ 400 VAC to the alternate fingers I could do electrolysis to even the purist form of ice. Electrolysis generates a gas barrier of hydrogen and oxygen under the ice allowing it to fall off. By watching the applied current you could tell how much ice was remaining . I.e. no current =no ice. This process only requires a few watts of power. The Mooney 231 wing exhibited the property of forming ice ridge in a very narrow pointed strip along the leading edge, Unlike the Cessna wing which makes for a much wider ice collection surface. I did not pursue additional development at that time due to some potential patent conflicts that I did not want to deal with. However, that is probably not an issue with the passage of time. To commercialize the device, the umanufacture of wide Kapton tape with copper layer, instead of the 3 foot segments I pieced together. But, I am an “old fart” and am not going to take on the Hercules size effort of bringing another product to market,
Especially with a very bureaucratic FAA in the mix.
Sort of like trying to break the sound barrier in Molasses.
 

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Andreas K

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I just wanted to refresh the memory of some of us Part 91 fliers in the US.
The important part is under (b) and highlighted and applies to experimental aircraft as well.
The keyword is forecast.


§ 91.527 Operating in icing conditions.

(a) No pilot may take off an airplane that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any propeller, windshield, stabilizing or control surface; to a powerplant installation; or to an airspeed, altimeter, rate of climb, or flight attitude instrument system or wing, except that takeoffs may be made with frost under the wing in the area of the fuel tanks if authorized by the FAA.

(b) No pilot may fly under IFR into known or forecast light or moderate icing conditions, or under VFR into known light or moderate icing conditions, unless -

(1) The aircraft has functioning deicing or anti-icing equipment protecting each rotor blade, propeller, windshield, wing, stabilizing or control surface, and each airspeed, altimeter, rate of climb, or flight attitude instrument system;
(2) The airplane has ice protection provisions that meet section 34 of Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 23; or
(3) The airplane meets transport category airplane type certification provisions, including the requirements for certification for flight in icing conditions.

(c) Except for an airplane that has ice protection provisions that meet the requirements in section 34 of Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 23, or those for transport category airplane type certification, no pilot may fly an airplane into known or forecast severe icing conditions.

(d) If current weather reports and briefing information relied upon by the pilot in command indicate that the forecast icing conditions that would otherwise prohibit the flight will not be encountered during the flight because of changed weather conditions since the forecast, the restrictions in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section based on forecast conditions do not apply.

Happy Thanksgiving

Andy
 

Turd Ferguson

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Only thing wrong with that Andy is that it's pulled from Subpart F which is applicable only to Large and Turbine-Powered Multiengine Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft.

It's does not apply to any other ops under Part 91 regardless of aircraft type - certificated, experimental, etc.
 

jedi

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So to further clarify or confuse the issue. Do the regulations allow VFR or IFR flight into known or forcast icing conditions for GA and experimental aircraft as long as they do not come under the transport or large aircraft limitations? If prohibited post the reference please. I am to lazy (full of turkey) to look it up again.

Careless or reckless issues set aside.
 

Turd Ferguson

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There are no regulatory prohibitions against operating a homebuilt airplane in icing conditions. Like most lightplanes, the pilot response to observed or detected structural icing should be immediate action to exit those conditions. A pilot is not automatically subject to certificate action just because ice forms on the airplane. Any investigation and subsequent action (or lack of) would be based on the totality of the circumstances.
 
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