Another commercial electric airplane

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by blane.c, Jun 21, 2019.

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  1. Jun 24, 2019 #21

    tspear

    tspear

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    I think it is interesting that they have focused on what is probably a moderate/achievable mission. Short range, lower speeds, 9 passengers, likely limits crew requirements also....
    Also, they seem to have been developing quietly for a while and only are going public when they are getting ready to test the prototype.

    Tim
     
  2. Jun 24, 2019 #22

    12notes

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    Stumbled on this while looking for a better photo of the tail wheel assembly, still not a technical article, but a bit more information:
    https://thepointsguy.com/news/eviation-alice-electric-plane-tour/

    "the aircraft can continue to fly with just the rear motor engaged. If one wing-mounted motor fails, the other will be disabled to maintain stability, and additional electric power can be diverted to the rear motor so the plane can continue its flight."

    The customer they have lined up, Cape Air, has short haul routes mostly under 240 miles, and they claim to be able to recharge an hour's worth of flight in 30 minutes. If the plane is close to the 240 knot cruising target, this would keep turnaround time reasonable.
     
  3. Jun 24, 2019 #23

    BBerson

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    I don't think the FAA has the criteria in place to certify an electric airplane.
     
  4. Jun 24, 2019 #24

    Dan Thomas

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    Probably not. The first applicant will have to work with the FAA to write up some regulations. That will delay things considerably, but that first applicant might get some free certification out of it.
     
  5. Jun 24, 2019 #25

    mm4440

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    https://www.youtube.com/user/MurryR100 The link to my EAA " Experimente"r article is not there anymore,will try to find.
     
  6. Jun 24, 2019 #26

    mm4440

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  7. Jun 25, 2019 #27

    BBerson

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    A locked tailwheel is useless if still in the air (or barely any weight is on it) when landing.
    A pilot sometimes lands on only one wheel, especially in a crosswind. That one wheel needs to be slightly behind the CG to be self correcting.
     
    mcrae0104 likes this.
  8. Jun 25, 2019 #28

    mm4440

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    If the wheel or wheels in front of the cg are free to caster there will be no ground loop. The fixed tailwheel acts like the vertical stab. If it is in the air you have to use the rudder to fly down the runway until it comes down. There are more details involved.
     
  9. Jun 25, 2019 #29

    BBerson

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    Sometimes the rudder is ineffective as well. Then try differential brakes. Trouble is differential brakes sort of impedes takeoff in an underpowered motorglider. (see avatar)
     
  10. Jun 25, 2019 #30

    narfi

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    Seems for this configuration the tailwheel could help prevent prop strikes on the rear prop.

    It is finished pretty plush for a 'prototype'... nice leather passenger seats with wireless charging stations, swivel seats for looking out the windows, etc.....
     
  11. Jun 25, 2019 #31

    BBerson

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    It's probable purpose was as a sales mockup instead of flight prototype. The article in post 1 said prototype number 2 is under construction. That means prototype 1 likely wasn't flyable, is my guess.
     
  12. Jun 25, 2019 #32

    narfi

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    according to wikipedia (which of course should be taken with a grain of salt)
    I think the current pictures are from the paris air show that just finished? but i didnt find any news about any initial flights taking place.......
     
  13. Jun 25, 2019 #33

    12notes

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    The article I posted stated that the prototype in Paris was airworthy. I've seen a few other articles stating the plane in Paris is fully functional, and that particular plane is heading to Arizona after the show for flight testing later this year.
     
  14. Jun 25, 2019 #34

    BBerson

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    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
  15. Jun 26, 2019 #35

    Dan Thomas

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    But at the same time, the prop won't be too far off the ground, either. One of the real drawbacks of pushers is the risk of prop damage by loose debris kicked up by the tires, as well as water splashed up by the wheels on a really wet runway. Trikes with tractor props have enough trouble as it is. I used to watch my apprentices running up airplanes after inspections, and would watch the surface under the prop. If there was water (a puddle), a waterspout would form and the puddle would disappear. This was with around 10" of prop tip/ground clearance. If there was sand or small stones, the vortex ring around the prop would sweep that stuff forward from a foot behind the prop, under it and then up into the prop. Kinda hard on the metal blades. Taildraggers with tractor props tend to get the best propeller life. Lots of ground clearance.

    This one was built at least 20 years ago as an aircraft for unimproved strips--rough stuff. I can't imagine that propeller life was very good at all.



    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2019
  16. Jun 26, 2019 #36

    tspear

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    If you are doing a static ground run up; the vortex pulling stuff up applies the same to a pusher and a tractor plane.
    The difference between the two really is either ground clearance or when moving. I do not see how the static test matters.

    Tim
     
  17. Jun 26, 2019 #37

    Dan Thomas

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    I was trying to get a point across: how much ground clearance can a pusher prop at the very end of a taildragger's fuselage have?

    And is that clearance requirement the reason the airplane's ground attitude is so flat?

    Geometry is such a pain, isn't it?
     
  18. Jun 27, 2019 #38

    tspear

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    Assuming I recall correctly, my Cirrus has a lower ground clearance on the prop as the Velocity Twin I was considering when sitting still. But yeah, on takeoff when you raise the nose, I am willing to bet the Velocity props are lower to the ground.

    Tim
     
  19. Jun 27, 2019 #39

    BJC

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    Yes, but the overall configuration appears to severely limit the AoA on takeoff and landing.

    It will be interesting to see if, as they wrote, it flies this fall.


    BJC
     
  20. Jun 27, 2019 #40

    mcrae0104

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    BB's right. With the proposed configuration, when taxiing with a crosswind, the plane will crab into the wind with the tailwheel skidding merrily behind over the pavement. The diagrams in the article are interesting but the self-correcting side force the tailwheel can generate is limited to the weight that is on it (with an ideal friction coefficient of 1).
     

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