Alnus Glutinosa, Black Alder !

Discussion in 'Wood Construction' started by Speedboat100, Sep 10, 2019.

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  1. Sep 10, 2019 #1

    Speedboat100

    Speedboat100

    Speedboat100

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    I purhased few boards of this..it is softer than spruce...but it bends amazingly at 1-1.5 mm thick veneers...I bet it could be used to make very good landing gear legs with some epoxy and glass fibre..in a mold.
     
  2. Sep 10, 2019 #2

    fly2kads

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    The mechanical properties of alder look pretty good, it should be useful. I know I have seen references to it's use in aircraft before, but I can't recall where off the top of my head.
     
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  3. Sep 10, 2019 #3

    Speedboat100

    Speedboat100

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    It is loved by the carpenters. It does not brake like spruce or pine or birch...no cracking.
     
  4. Sep 20, 2019 #4

    mullacharjak

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    I think white ash would be better for a landing gear.It should be a lot stiffer altough slightly heavier.Are you thinking of a pietenpol landing gear? I am thinking of River red gum legs for my pietenpol because its locally available.Better than steel!
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019
  5. Sep 20, 2019 #5

    Speedboat100

    Speedboat100

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    I think a layer of carbon..in between each wood layer makes it real strong. You need no real mold...a jig rather.
     
  6. Sep 20, 2019 #6

    Aerowerx

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    Shagbark Hickory.
     
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  7. Sep 20, 2019 #7

    Aerowerx

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    The carbon would be so much stronger than the wood, there is no real need for the wood. Save money and use extruded foam instead.

    Unless you need more stiffness, then the wood might have a benefit. The thing about using carbon fiber is that it is so strong that the problem is usually the stiffness. I have seen videos of carbon fiber wing testing where the wing half was bent almost 90 degrees, and the test jig then broke! (I have no real experience building with carbon. This is just from what I have read.)
     
  8. Sep 20, 2019 #8

    bmcj

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    I prefer Natalie Wood.
     
  9. Sep 20, 2019 #9

    Aerowerx

    Aerowerx

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    That species in extinct.
     
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  10. Sep 21, 2019 #10

    Speedboat100

    Speedboat100

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    Okay then possibly just few layers of carbon on the underside...as the mold phase can be avoided and adequate stiffness reached.
     
  11. Sep 21, 2019 #11

    Speedboat100

    Speedboat100

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    Just bent simple form in a lifting fuselage type of efficient ac.
     
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  12. Sep 21, 2019 #12

    Aerowerx

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    A better idea may be to make the gear out of laminated wood strips, then put a woven carbon fiber tube around the outside.

    And I have read this about laminating wood, particularly for laminated landing gear....Put a single layer of glass fiber cloth between the layers. The only purpose of the glass cloth is to keep a uniform layer of epoxy of the right thickness.

    Lots of possibilities here. I just wanted to point out that anything made with carbon fiber usually reaches the required strength before the required stiffness. And the layer of glass between laminations eliminates the "starved joint" problem.
     
  13. Sep 21, 2019 #13

    mullacharjak

    mullacharjak

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    I once visited Aircraft manufacturing factory at Pakistan Aeronautical complex Kamra long long ago.They make the Mashak and Super Mashak aircraft.They still do and its a beautiful aircraft.It is a swedish design by SAAB. What I vividly remember is the manufacturing of the main gear legs. 125 layers(I counted them !) of glass cloth which looked like ordinary cross fibres saturated with epoxy were loaded along with tthe die into an oven and cooked. The resultant gear leg is about 1 1/2 inch thick and truely impressive. Its in two pieces and you can use it as a battering ram.Maybe now they have switched to carbon. I was wondering why the flimsy leaf aluminum spring gear is still on the homebuilt aircraft like VP 1 as I think the carbon/glass landing gear is a very superior thing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019

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