Aircraft Lift?

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erkki67

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Hello

a few hangars seam to be high enough to store an aircraft somehow at an imaginary second floor.

I learned that some roofs where not built to handle the additional weight of aircraft .

does there existe some kind of aircraft lifts, that can handle aircraft up to 1000kg?

rgds Erkki
 

Hot Wings

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does there existe some kind of aircraft lifts, that can handle aircraft up to 1000kg?

rgds Erkki

Yes, I've seen them advertised in the past. They were.are just an adaptation of the standard 2 post auto lifts but modified for a single post and arms to fit a typical nose gear aircraft. I also remember them mentioning that the concrete floor of the hangar had to meet some specifications so they could be bolted to inserts in the floor.

If you want to try to DIY (do it yourself) take a look at how forklift chains work for ideas.
 

Derswede

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If you mean to store a plane for a period of time, you can do what we did with our Luscombe. Pulled the wings off, built up a simple frame that attached to the wing attach points, and used a hoist to lift it up. I stored a friend's Hi Max in my warehouse for several months, lifted it with an electric 100 kg capacity hoist, used a wide strap around the gear legs. I have pulled many a fuselage out of old barns, being held up by old rope. A small hoist works wonders in those cases, as old rope tends to fail at the most critical moments.

If you mean to store a plane that you want to fly a couple of times a month, it would be better to get any non-flying items off the floor to make space for flying planes. I have helped lift several retractable planes in the past, a floor mounted jack system is best, as the frames of many buildings are not rated for lift stresses. Designers of buildings typically look at two load factors, wind load and snow or roof load. I have seen improperly rated trusses bend and fail when loaded improperly. If your hanger is a typical "A" roof structure, it may need some renforcement to allow the trusses to bear the load of raising/lowering a 2,000 lb aircraft. Supporting the plane would be my worry, using straps under the wings at attach points seems to be a simple thing, but we did wrinkle the wing skin on a Bonanza lifting it in that fashion ( didn't matter in that case, the in-hanger gear collapse did much more damage).

One way, ( tho expensive) is to use a lifting platform lifted either by a toothed rail/ drive on each corner, or by synced winches. The building would need to be able to support the load or the lift would have to be self supporting. Brainstorming here, I used to work for a company that made auto lifts. It may be possible to use something like that, disassemble, mount the vertical lift posts in such a way to allow the plane to be lifted by the landing gear. The downside of this idea is that most auto lifts are rated at a 6' max lift. It may allow you to stack two planes into less space, but I would worry about crunching the lower plane. Also, never break laws, the law of gravity has expensive penalties. Putting stuff in rafters seems to be fine until something falls. Don't ask how I know.....!

Derswede
 

Sockmonkey

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If you plan on raising it often, one alternative to a floor jack would be to install a few mounting hard points on the fuselage where you can connect cables to hoist the thing up without risking damage. You still have to make sure the roof can handle it, but it's probably one of the cheaper solutions.
 

lr27

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I wonder what happens to the hangar in the video if it has 4 or 5 feet of snow on top. Not unknown in New England.
 

Joe Fisher

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When I have needed to I put my Cub with the tail against the ceiling.When I lived in Nebraska I new the man that bought my Cub new in 1946. At that time he and 4 others bought 5 brand new Cubs and started a flying service. They rented one "T" hanger at night they would stack all 5 with a cushion under the nose in the one "T" hanger. You don't want the fuel tank clear full.

https://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/forums/album.php?albumid=62&attachmentid=8794
 

Jay Kempf

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I have a huge shop with a lift in the back of a two deep bay and lots of room around. I also have another garage on the property 80 or so feet from the big hoose.

The thing about having a lift like that in an otherwise used space is that the wrong thing is always on the lift and you have to do a 4-6 car move to reposition everything. In the winter it is even more of a beeaaatttchhhh moving things around every snow storm and factoring plow moves in. Such is my current life. 2000 feet above sea level in central VT facing the prevailing weather doesn't help either.

Next time I redesign the entire thing knowing what I know now. Large commercial building, small house, lots of area around the commercial building, doors on both ends, auxiliary parking lot for long term storage, yadda... (Obsessive Compulsive Disease understood in that last bit).
 

Pops

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When I have needed to I put my Cub with the tail against the ceiling.When I lived in Nebraska I new the man that bought my Cub new in 1946. At that time he and 4 others bought 5 brand new Cubs and started a flying service. They rented one "T" hanger at night they would stack all 5 with a cushion under the nose in the one "T" hanger. You don't want the fuel tank clear full.

http://www.homebuiltairplanes.com/forums/album.php?albumid=62&attachmentid=8794

You mean like this in a crowded hanger. That is an 1943 L4 fuselage hanging above my SSSC on it nose in the first picture. Putting the landing gear on one of the 4 Bearhawks below. Picture of the 24' long Bearhawk fuselage jig with a fuselage inside, a 1938 Piper Cub Sport fuselage on it's nose, my SSSC on it's nose with the L4 above and a Bearhawk fuselage on the left side of the jig. Under the table is the rack for all of the 4130 tubing. Where there is a will, there is a way.
 

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You mean like this in a crowded hanger. That is an 1943 L4 fuselage hanging above my SSSC on it nose in the first picture. Putting the landing gear on one of the 4 Bearhawks below. Picture of the 24' long Bearhawk fuselage jig with a fuselage inside, a 1938 Piper Cub Sport fuselage on it's nose, my SSSC on it's nose with the L4 above and a Bearhawk fuselage on the left side of the jig. Under the table is the rack for all of the 4130 tubing. Where there is a will, there is a way.[/QUOTE

Pops

Any practical reason why the SSSC could not be stored on it's nose with fuel in the tanks. How were they vented?

Commercial operations used to economize on hangers stacking J3 h nose tanks.

http://blog.modernmechanix.com/mags/PopularScience/2-1940/planes_on_noses.jpg

How high is the tail rudder post with the tail on the ground?

Mattplanes_on_noses.jpg
 

Hephaestus

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YMM
One of the localish hangars, the owner parks his 182 on a what appears to be a modified 4 post car lift. Looks like he's replaced the crossbars with something much wider, ramps tweaked, wheel runs are deep channels, significantly higher than stock - looks like 18" or so? . Usually has a smaller home built he parks underneath.

Never stopped and talked but it's caught my eye as I head to the eaa chapter
 
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