Air Parks & Fly-In Communities

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Meyersg

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After 20 years moving with the Air Force, I retired the second time, moved back to the panhandle of Florida (18FD) and love it. Nice grass strip with good neighbors. About half live here full time. I told my wife we are not moving again. I think she is OK with that.
 

Rhino

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I'm assuming Chandelle Airpark? I drove through it one afternoon looking at a lot for sale and had an unfriendly encounter with a resident. It's not a gated community and the street signs denote they are public streets so I was little confused by his agitation.
Yes, Chandelle. I won't comment on the resident, but I probably know who it was. Like I said, things have improved, but some individual people sometimes refuse to change. Try not to judge the airpark based on that one person. I don't think anything's listed, but I know there's a lot or two that might be available for sale. For the right price, you might even convince me to sell my house. :p
 
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Mark Z

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Granbury, Texas USA 0TX0
After 20 years moving with the Air Force, I retired the second time, moved back to the panhandle of Florida (18FD) and love it. Nice grass strip with good neighbors. About half live here full time. I told my wife we are not moving again. I think she is OK with that.
Do you reckon if I moved in the half of them would stay gone all the time?
 

Pops

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Do you reckon if I moved in the half of them would stay gone all the time?
Its like that at our airpark. During the winter there is just a few of us here. Leave right after Thanksgiving and back about the first of May.
I like each season. Looking forward to the snow.
 

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PredragVasic

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And the biggie, selective enforcement and president and board members that thinks the covenants didn't apply to them. [...] Never again will be a member of a HOA .
I have noticed one thing that is quite consistent across all sorts of discussion boards; from this one, focusing on aviation (in discussion related to air parks), to all other areas of human interest across the internet, there seem to be near-universal anger, frustration and outright hatred of the concept of the HOA (Home Owners Associations). One could easily conclude that the whole idea is simply nonsensical, and that the communities where HOAs exist are largely undesirable.

This conclusion doesn't quite jibe with the evidence from the real estate marketplace. When compared to properties similar in every other respect, the homes in HOAs seem to consistently fetch higher prices, regardless of geographic location in USA. In other words, either nobody knows the dirty little secret of HOAs until it's too late (and are simply fooled by other qualities of the community), or the percentage of HOAs with out-of-control members is rather small, but, as everything else that's marginal, get greatly amplified online.

It is very rare, if ever, that you'll see a discussion post, somewhere online, that praises their HOA. Obviously, this is fairly consistent with normal human behaviour; people normally raise their voice(s) when they have concerns; not when they don't. Still, it would be nice to have a chance to get a bit more realistic picture of the whole HOA idea. I have never experienced one, never even visited people who live in one (at least I don't think I have); we just don't have them here in Manhattan... The closest we have is co-op boards (an apartment building where owners don't own their apartments, but instead shares in the entire building, proportionate to the size/value of their apartment). There may be some runaway co-op board that restrict the size and type of Christmas holiday (Hanukkah is apparently rather big around here) decorations on your door, but those seem to be trivially minor nuisances compared to the horror stories about HOAs.
 

rivilee

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Tullahoma, Tennessee
Yes, Chandelle. I won't comment on the resident, but I probably know who it was. Like I said, things have improved, but some individual people sometimes refuse to change. Try not to judge the airpark based on that one person. I don't think anything's listed, but I know there's a lot or two that might be available for sale. For the right price, you might even convince me to sell my house. :p
Oh it's a lovely airpark. It's just down the road from where I live (Belair Subdivision) and the fellow wasn't truly belligerent with me. This was before the two new houses were built.
And don't worry, I don't have the right price! I only have an ultralight that hopefully one day I'll finish so we're comfortable in our current humble abode. But it's a nice dream to have.
Nice to know someone else on this forum who's in Tullahoma!
 

Rhino

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I have noticed one thing that is quite consistent across all sorts of discussion boards; from this one, focusing on aviation (in discussion related to air parks), to all other areas of human interest across the internet, there seem to be near-universal anger, frustration and outright hatred of the concept of the HOA (Home Owners Associations). One could easily conclude that the whole idea is simply nonsensical, and that the communities where HOAs exist are largely undesirable...
Airparks are like a lot of other things. Only the bad ones get the publicity.
 

Rhino

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Oh it's a lovely airpark. It's just down the road from where I live (Belair Subdivision) and the fellow wasn't truly belligerent with me. This was before the two new houses were built.
And don't worry, I don't have the right price! I only have an ultralight that hopefully one day I'll finish so we're comfortable in our current humble abode. But it's a nice dream to have.
Nice to know someone else on this forum who's in Tullahoma!
There's a couple of others on here from this area.
 

rv7charlie

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PDV, I suspect that many of the points in your post are confusing correlation with causation, and miss some important details. For instance, the *vast* majority of homeowners do not have to deal with any variation on an HOA, and the areas that have them typically start out as 'upscale' developments, that are designed to attract purchasers who tend to be...this is perhaps a bit too strong a word, but...elitist, and aren't happy until everyone around them conforms to their ideals.

Another issue is that your data set isn't a 'scientific' survey. What you see is only data from those motivated to post, and humans are a lot more motivated to publicly express their grievances than their pleasures.

Many people buy an established house in an HOA neighborhood, never attempt to make any changes to it, and later sell, so never have any dealings with the HOA at all. Then there are others, like my stepson, who bought an established house, had the bushes in front die during the big freeze last winter (house is in Houston TX), and then got a letter from the HOA telling him that he had to replace his fence. The fence that had been there for years without the HOA forcing its removal. (Selective enforcement.) Or a former coworker of mine who built a house in a development built around a large private lake. Hundreds of homes in the development. He spent uncountable hours dealing with the HOA on all sorts of nonsensical issues. Their parting shot as his builder was finally in the last stages of construction, was waiting for the HOA to tell him what color (and what shade of that color) he could paint his front door.
 

Rhino

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We lived in an Omaha neighborhood that had an HOA with a president that could be described as elitist. I was even an officer on the HOA and an elected official on the Sanitary Improvement District board. I wanted to build a storage shed in my back yard. She didn't like sheds, but there was nothing in the covenants banning them so she couldn't stop me (this was a really nice shed). The building department made a mistake on my permit and approved it too close to the street. I learned later she knew this at the time, but kept her mouth shut so she could have the satisfaction of watching me demolish my shed later. When it was complete, she filed a complaint and the building department realized their mistake. But I was legally liable, and the shed couldn't remain. She didn't get her wish though. I had another foundation built, jacked the shed up on braces I built, and used a come along to roll it over to the new location. Even got a cool dad moment watching the look of shock on my oldest son's face when he realized he could actually move this huge shed by cranking a handle. She didn't get what she wanted and I got the satisfaction of knowing that, even though it cost me a pretty penny. My neighbors loved it because they were on my side.

That story is fairly typical of many of the HOA horror stories you hear about. But I relate it here to show that it isn't typical at all. That HOA did a great job while we lived there, outside that one incident. Although there was the odd elitist, there was no prevalent elitist attitude in that neighborhood. Most everyone got along just fine, and there were no other incidents like that that I ever heard of (she didn't get reelected). So although there are cases of HOA abuses and overreach, and those are the stories most widely disseminated, they really aren't the norm. After the initial clashes I had with my HOA here, and my threatening a lawsuit, there have been no problems whatsoever. We've even collaborated on a few occasions since. So I make no blanket condemnations of HOAs in general, just those that are abusive, or whose members are. The real joke here is, after that experience in Omaha, we vowed never, ever, ever to live in a neighborhood with an HOA again. :D
 
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Pops

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I have noticed one thing that is quite consistent across all sorts of discussion boards; from this one, focusing on aviation (in discussion related to air parks), to all other areas of human interest across the internet, there seem to be near-universal anger, frustration and outright hatred of the concept of the HOA (Home Owners Associations). One could easily conclude that the whole idea is simply nonsensical, and that the communities where HOAs exist are largely undesirable.

This conclusion doesn't quite jibe with the evidence from the real estate marketplace. When compared to properties similar in every other respect, the homes in HOAs seem to consistently fetch higher prices, regardless of geographic location in USA. In other words, either nobody knows the dirty little secret of HOAs until it's too late (and are simply fooled by other qualities of the community), or the percentage of HOAs with out-of-control members is rather small, but, as everything else that's marginal, get greatly amplified online.

It is very rare, if ever, that you'll see a discussion post, somewhere online, that praises their HOA. Obviously, this is fairly consistent with normal human behaviour; people normally raise their voice(s) when they have concerns; not when they don't. Still, it would be nice to have a chance to get a bit more realistic picture of the whole HOA idea. I have never experienced one, never even visited people who live in one (at least I don't think I have); we just don't have them here in Manhattan... The closest we have is co-op boards (an apartment building where owners don't own their apartments, but instead shares in the entire building, proportionate to the size/value of their apartment). There may be some runaway co-op board that restrict the size and type of Christmas holiday (Hanukkah is apparently rather big around here) decorations on your door, but those seem to be trivially minor nuisances compared to the horror stories about HOAs.
I talked to a real estate agent a few months ago about putting our place on the market. Was told the HOA would be a negative on the selling price.
 

sanman

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Feb 24, 2021
Messages
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Do Air Parks or Fly-In communities offer rentals through AirBNB? If not, then it would be useful to create an app for that. Seems to me there could be a market for people flying their own aircraft to be able to fly into some local Air Park community, land at the local air strip and park their plane at some home they've rented for the week or the weekend. Does that kind of thing happen?
 

Pops

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Do Air Parks or Fly-In communities offer rentals through AirBNB? If not, then it would be useful to create an app for that. Seems to me there could be a market for people flying their own aircraft to be able to fly into some local Air Park community, land at the local air strip and park their plane at some home they've rented for the week or the weekend. Does that kind of thing happen?
Yes , It happens. There is a Air BNB on our airpark.
 

Rhino

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Many airparks have covenant restrictions against rentals, so it varies from place to place. My airpark for instance, does not allow rentals.
 

Cardmarc

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Jun 16, 2021
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72
Do Air Parks or Fly-In communities offer rentals through AirBNB? If not, then it would be useful to create an app for that.
An app would be helpful. But the fact of the matter is that most Airparks (like the well run HOA airpark I live in) prohibit anyone using the runway but ‘owners’ and ‘invited guests’. Insurance reasons. And a ‘business’ like an air bandb or similar does not qualify. (Long term leases are differently treated). HOA insurance reasons as well; roads are often taxiways. Roads and runways, etc (except individual residential lots) are ‘common property’ owed by all HOA members and paid for by dues. I for one would NEVER live in ANY airpark that didn’t have a decent HOA to protect us all.
 

Dana

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Local airpark (9B8) is open to the public, has a nice grass runway (with a VASI, no less!). Dunno if there's a HOA, but there must be something to manage runway maintenance.
 

Pops

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Local airpark (9B8) is open to the public, has a nice grass runway (with a VASI, no less!). Dunno if there's a HOA, but there must be something to manage runway maintenance.
At one time I had a VASI system and all the instruments to install it. We installed the runway lights and due to the surrounding high hills couldn't get the required clearance for the approach for the VASI. We removed the runway lights and gave everything to someone with a private airport. No night operations.
 

gtae07

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A substantial amount of new single-family home construction in the last couple decades, especially in suburban areas, appears to be done in the subdivision model and those typically have HOAs whether the people buying there really want them or not. If you want a neighborhood of sorts, but don't want to live in an urban area, you're mostly stuck with some form of one, at least in the areas I've lived around.

When compared to properties similar in every other respect, the homes in HOAs seem to consistently fetch higher prices, regardless of geographic location in USA. In other words, either nobody knows the dirty little secret of HOAs until it's too late (and are simply fooled by other qualities of the community), or the percentage of HOAs with out-of-control members is rather small, but, as everything else that's marginal, get greatly amplified online.
I think the higher prices are probably related to the age and sizes of said houses (typically newer, and larger albeit on ever-shrinking land area). When we were shopping for houses thirteen something years ago (we still live in the house we bought shortly after getting married) it was very difficult to find a house that met our size and budget criteria that wasn't part of an HOA, unless we were willing to move out "into the country" such as it was, and she wasn't willing. Nowadays, in our area and the area we were shopping around in earlier this year (when I thought I'd be moving), it's still very difficult unless you want an older home (or build new) out in a more rural area. I think there's also a lot of "surely it can't be that bad" combined with people not really thinking much about it. I know that's how we were back then.

Our HOA goes back and forth. To this day I'm still amazed I was able to get away with building a 28x24 detached garage in my back yard, on a .19 acre lot; I took the HOA requirements for "accessory structures" and went through line-by-line showing how I met each one. Sometimes an overzealous "enforcement" person gets in place and drives around whining that people need to pressure wash or something, and we had really creepy, sleazy scumbag as our president for a bit. But overall they haven't been that bad; the biggest benefit from my perspective is that they operate and maintain the neighborhood pool.


On topic, I would love to live in a fly-in community. But my wife has absolutely vetoed the idea on multiple grounds.
 
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