AerOplane CamOuflage

Discussion in 'Finishing Techniques' started by ebonheart_2, Jan 28, 2006.

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  1. Jan 28, 2006 #1

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

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    Is Camouflage very popular on homebuilt aircraft? Well..... I think it's interesting, so I was looking around on the web for info. on how aircraft are/were camouflaged and why... I didnt come up with what I was expecting, but did come up with a bit of information on ground camouflage and a little on aircraft... I thought it was interesting none the less.

    An article... although a few of the pics. are photo shoped rather poorly, comparitivly speaking... I thought the real picture of a fake canopy was pritty cool.
    http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com...ns-successfully-tested-for-aircraft/index.php


    Here is a link to some ok presentations on what the new (Macro/Micro & Sym-ax) camo is, and kinda how it is applied to vehicles and stuff.
    http://www.marcorsyscom.usmc.mil/sites/marpat/marpat_pattern.asp
    I tried contacting the Dr. but I guess he doesnt have that address anymore.

    Scroll down a wase and read teh Theory of Camouflage
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camouflage

    and that's all I could come up with.:ermm:
    I sappose if you dont want to come up with your own you could alwase just try to copy one that looked cool, or you thought would work good. I've been trying to camouflage some things by what those presentations had on them.. but I just cant figure out where all that sym-ax stuff would go for something like an airplain; too many curves and stuff... but just squareing everything off and using a few different colors looked like camo... I cant say if it would work very well or not though.
     
  2. Jan 29, 2006 #2

    StRaNgEdAyS

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    Interesting stuff.
    I do like that idea of the canopy on the underside, that's pretty clever.
    Unless you had a warbird of replica thereof I could imagine you'd be getting some pretty "special" attention from the homeland security goons if you decided to paint your aircraft in camouflage pattern these days.
     
  3. Jan 29, 2006 #3

    whirlybomber

    whirlybomber

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    maybe not, strange.

    unless you try and stealth the exhaust of the engine that is......
     
  4. Jan 29, 2006 #4

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

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  5. Jan 29, 2006 #5

    Johnny luvs Biplanes

    Johnny luvs Biplanes

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    Lozenge fabric was camouflage used in the first world war, there was night, day and marine varieties, also phsycodelic varieties too!
    John
     
  6. Jan 30, 2006 #6

    orion

    orion

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    Keep in mind that most common camo paint schemes involve relatively dark colors. This means that in the summer (or in the sun even on a cool day) the airplane will heat up significntly. In a metal airplane, the surfaces might get so how they'll be difficult to touch - the interior will be very uncomfortable. On a composite airplane, the hot surfaces may heat up significantly to damage the structure. That's probably why camo paint schemes aren's so popular.

    A secondary reason many might be avoiding this paint approach is that the camo paint job will be extremely difficult to spot in case of a forced landing.
     
  7. Jan 30, 2006 #7

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

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    http://www.wwiaviation.com/cammo.shtml
    http://www.wwiaviation.com/lozenge.shtml
    http://www.gtmodels.com/web/pages/fabric.htm
    That stuff looks funny I think... do you know why they used purple and stuff?

    I was thinking about an all metal plane. It'd be even worse with a flat black cockpit huh... another reason to have a light gray interior; maybe a dark gray panel. If you werent able to walk away from the crash then yes, if you had a pritty good camo scheme your going to be waiting a while longer.
     
  8. Jan 30, 2006 #8

    Rhino

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  9. Jan 31, 2006 #9

    jumpinjan

    jumpinjan

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    The Germans did use a redish-brown and a forest green, just like the allied aircraft. So, there were mistakes as to who was friend and foe. In April 1917, the Germans changed the brown to a light grayish violet (although, the violet hue varied from Mauve-to-deep Violet).
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2006
  10. Jan 31, 2006 #10

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

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  11. Feb 4, 2006 #11

    gahan

    gahan

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    mini max 109G camo paint

    morinig all
    I applied for an N number on the internet with the FAA and ask for 109G and I almost soiled myself when they informed me that it was availible,I'ts been reserved for the past year and I just renewed the number . I will be finishing with poly tone paint , a powder blue coat on the whole plane then grey and darker blue for the camouflage . a bright yellow cowl and rudder.
    will the poly tone stick to the lexan fuel tank covers:confused: and the aluminum inspection covers or do I have to locate another type paint?
     
  12. Mar 12, 2006 #12

    CAVMan

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    Aircraft camouflage started out using ground patterns because the early aircraft missions had them flying close to the ground, making it hard for a bandit(enemy) to spot them when trying to gain the preferred look-down attitude for their attack. Today's aircraft still use camouflage, but the use of AAA & SAM's has caused aircraft to operate at higher altitudes. That's why today high altitude military aircraft use a grey or grey/blue paint scheme that allow them to blend to the sky at altitude.

    Those of us that still fly in the trees continue to use the ground camo color schemes, we just don't pattern them any more due to efficiency of repair and $.

    Oh yeah, I would not recommend using a camo scheme on a civilian aircraft. The whole idea is for other aircraft to see you easily.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2006
  13. Mar 13, 2006 #13

    Craig

    Craig

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    Poly-tone

    Polytone doesn't stick too well to metal, unless you use a good epoxy primer under it. Then it sticks well.
    Generally, for the metal parts, I use the poly-thane - a two-part urethane in the same colors. It is glossy, as are the enamels from Polyfiber. I've not tired to downgrade the gloss any, but I think there are additives that do that.
     
  14. Mar 18, 2006 #14

    gahan

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    craig
    thanks for tip on paint,I sprayed a lite coat of rustoliom:rolleyes: primer on the lexan and then sprayed the poly spray on ,no checking it took great but i did the same on the alum. insp. covers pretty heavy coat and it rinkeled up:confused: fixed it with a light coat on next try it came out fine:ban:
    I have completed the flight control cables and have half the fusalage covered. Should finish this step this week end. I also compleated the fire wall with an engine turn finish it came out totaly cool, took it to show and tell at eaa meeting and bent the sides and bottom, it fits:D I'm going to 2cycle section do a little diging and add a thread on rotax 582 that i can pick up rite from a local source who wants to up grade to a 4 cycle rotax it's not a 912 he thinks it's an 8 something sounds like late model snowmobile. I'm at the begining of the knowklege curve on this area.

    reguards
    tom gahan
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2006
  15. Jun 1, 2008 #15

    WurlyBird

    WurlyBird

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    ATC does not use that sophisticated of radar except for ASRs, PARs, etc. I talked with some ATC folk back in the day, where I flew gliders was just outside of Orlando International's airspace and we were curious if the FAA would be waiting for us on the ground if we accidentally "bumped" into their airspace. I was told that the fiberglass and tube and fabric aircraft had almost no signature and the aluminum ones would show up periodically for short periods. ATC radar is based largely on the response from your transponder.

    This is at least how it was explained to me by a small group of ATC operator, so it may not be completely accurate.
     
  16. Jun 1, 2008 #16

    Waiter

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  17. Jun 3, 2008 #17

    WurlyBird

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    Very nice! That will stand out for sure, among other aircraft I mean. I have a question about painting it dark (ish) colors. I always read that all composite aircraft, molded ones and not just foam core ones, were primarily all white because the heat also has unpredictable effects on the resins used and could weaken the structures. Have you heard this anywhere? If this is inaccurate I would love to hear what is. That whole knowledge is power thing is only true if your knowledge is built on facts, right? In any case, great looking plane. I look forward to seeing pictures of it flying.
     
  18. Jun 3, 2008 #18

    Waiter

    Waiter

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    The darker the color, the more heat it will absorb from the Suns radiation.

    There are several color/temperature charts that can be found, but their origination is a little bit questionable.

    So, I did my own testing.

    you can find the results posted on my web site under the second link listed above.

    http://www.iflyez.com/LongEZ_Retrofit_JUN_07.shtml

    Scroll down to the 9 JUNE entry

    Waiter
     
  19. Jun 3, 2008 #19

    Dana

    Dana

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    Consider too that if you ever go down in a remote area, having a camouflage paint job will make it much more difficult for searchers to locate you.

    -Dana

    It's only premarital sex if you're going to get married.
     
  20. Jun 3, 2008 #20

    WurlyBird

    WurlyBird

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    Oh yes, I checked out your weblinks, it looks great. I was just curious if you had read anything similar to what I had about the heat being damaging to the resins, regardless of being built up on foam or not. you mention the heat causing the foam to get damaged and delaminate but did not mention possible weakening of the composite itself. For instance the only glider I have seen that is not white, or very light blue, is one that was made entirely of prepreg cloth and it was bright orange, and these are all hollow molded composition. The reason I always hear this is is due to the resins weakening to potential failure if heated.
     

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