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Airplane For Sale Aeronca 7AC

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

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Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
9,830
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
A Champ is really, really not that difficult of an airplane to own, maintain, restore, and operate. Yes a "basket case" is a lot of work. Treat it as if it is two different hobbies combined into one (education learning how to restore an antique, and owning/flying an inexpensive airplane). If you do this, and assign a dollar value to each of those benefits, the time and cost will be much more reasonable.

It is a DELIGHTFUL airplane to fly, inexpensive, a good and forgiving teacher, and you will see people's faces light up with joy wherever you go.

Try that with a 172 (and I am a 172 owner)
 

challenger_II

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
609
Location
Fisher County, Tx. USA
Know THAT feeling, quite well! In the last 6 weeks, I have been called by two AI's, wanting fabric work on three separate airplanes.

As an airframe mechanic with extensive wood and fabric experience I would often find myself called upon to carry out wood and fabric repairs to these aircraft by AI's who would watch very carefully to learn what I did. The most common aircraft were Champ and Citabria And the occasional super cub, in addition to the wood and fabric gliders I usually did.
 

OhAnElBirds

Active Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Messages
43
The baggage compartment that little basically fitted bag behind the back seat was originally made of cotton. While at this time they likely all have been modified/replaced it is worth noting that the cotton eventually rots, so things like say that little fuel checker we all used to have with the screwdriver end can fall through the rotten cotton bag and end up under the floor. There are several documented instances were the control system got jammed by objects like this.
I have an L-3 (it would be certified under A-751 were it not an NX, not under A-759), but the plywood floor extends under the cotton bag. If I had a Champ and it didn't, it soon would. On the L-3 the back wall is likewise 1/4 or 3/8 ply so stuff in the BC stays in the BC. (While it's not great having it down there, I can't quite picture how a plastic fuel checker dohickey could possibly jam the elevator push-rod, or rudder cables.)
The copper line from the fuel primer to the firewall can work harden and break, I spent much of a return to home flight with my thumb covering the leak. Also the primer lines to the engine often break off and cause a lean cylinder...
So, a steel tube and fabric airplane is Paul Bunyan's axe-- it lasts forever. But Paul is on his tenth handle and sixth head. The individual parts in old airplanes have life limits. My Taylorcraft was built in 1943, the oldest hoses are a decade old and none of the metal lines are original to the airplane (neither are the fuel tanks for that matter).
The radio (handheld?) will not work with stock ignition. The ignition if not already done must be modified with either resistance spark plugs (easiest/cheapest) or resistance ignition leads or all you will hear in the radio is staccato that Varey's directly with engine RPM.
With a pressure cowl the simple (and less expensive) solution, is to replace the bottom plugs with resistor units and those leads with shielded ones. Because there is more room underneath and the cowl will not be in the way. Normally the left magneto fires the bottom plugs. Simply switch the right mag off when using the transmitter.
 
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dwalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2021
Messages
533
Location
Tennessee
Most I.A. will sign off a restoration with only a final inspection. The work can be supervised periodically by any A&P.
The clips on my Chief Goodyear disc brakes would fall out. Seem to work fine after half the clips were gone.
This is pretty much what my A&P buddy told me, he needed to do some specific stuff himself and supervise me for the rest and have another IA come out at a couple of key points as well. Still, like most other A&Ps I know he is stupid busy and has no spare time.
 

pfarber

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
877
Location
Dollywood
As an airframe mechanic with extensive wood and fabric experience I would often find myself called upon to carry out wood and fabric repairs to these aircraft by AI's who would watch very carefully to learn what I did. The most common aircraft were Champ and Citabria And the occasional super cub, in addition to the wood and fabric gliders I usually did.
getting any wood/fabric experience is hard.
Most I.A. will sign off a restoration with only a final inspection. The work can be supervised periodically by any A&P.
The clips on my Chief Goodyear disc brakes would fall out. Seem to work fine after half the clips were gone.
if they don’t inspect the wing structure pre covering I hope you put in a ton of inspection rings.

pencil whipping a 337? not doing a thorough pre cover? please tell me who these garbage ai are so I can avoid them.

quick Story time. Guy with a stearman asked a ai to do an annual. While looking over the ac before agreeing he saw that none of the inspection rings were cut open… they still had the original fabric coverings. when asked how long it’s been since the wings were cover owner said 7 years!?!? When told that he would need to cut the inspection rings open to, you know, inspect the wings, the owner flatly refused. AI explained the situation but the owner refused to allow the fabric to be cut. AI said have a good day. Owner still didn’t understand why he wouldn’t do the annual.
 

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
1,451
Location
Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
Mostly I wore "BUNNY BOOTS"
Amazon.com: Bata Military Bunny Boots Extreme Cold Weather Vapor Barrier Boots - 8 : Everything Else

I still have a pair that I bought new around 30 years ago, I only use them when I need them and are still nearly as new. Of course when I was working I wore out many pairs. Because they are so durable, solid rubber inside and out "THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE".
My father had a role in testing/designing those.
I personally did my best to try to convince him they were fine as boots but didn’t need to be snowshoes too.
I guess he never passed that observation up there chain of command .
 

BBerson

Light Plane Philosopher
HBA Supporter
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
15,350
Location
Port Townsend WA
“pencil whipping a 337? not doing a thorough pre cover? please tell me who these garbage ai are so I can avoid them.”
pfarber- I.A. or FAA or DAR do not do pre cover anymore. Yes they look into inspection holes.
 

Bellaire MK

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2021
Messages
13
Form 337 or FA (Field Approval) would be for modifications and or alterations of structure. When taking on a restoration or annual inspection one usually researches SBs and ADs as required. There are STCs for upgrades if one chooses, also owner built parts are legal provided they are manufactured to original specifications. There's no mystery to this! You guys can add to this if I missed anything. And yes there is an STC for the Lycoming O-235 for the 7AC.
 

blane.c

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
5,174
Location
capital district NY
Every engine change on the 7AC changed it to a different model like 7BC or 7KCAB, there is a list of them, so it wouldn't be a 7AC anymore with a O-235 it would have the appropriate letter grouping after the 7.

Aeronca-Genealogy.pdf (univair.com)

My memory says the list is a lot longer and that this is an abbreviated list, but then it is my memory.
 
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bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,942
Location
Fresno, California
Every engine change on the 7AC changed it to a different model like 7BC or 7KCAB, there is a list of them, so it wouldn't be a 7AC anymore with a O-235 it would have the appropriate letter grouping after the 7.

Aeronca-Genealogy.pdf (univair.com)

My memory says the list is a lot longer and that this is an abbreviated list, but then it is my memory.
Mine was originally 7AC, but the 90hp install changed it to 7DC.
 

OhAnElBirds

Active Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2021
Messages
43
Mine was originally 7AC, but the 90hp install changed it to 7DC.
Wisconsin Oddities:
Many 7FCs and 7JCs (and the J's were just-plain-odd to begin with) had the third wheel returned to it's proper place becoming 7ECs in the process. Some FCs were built as flight school trainers with a yoke in front (student position) and stick in back... Then there is the Lancer...
 

bmcj

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
13,942
Location
Fresno, California
Wisconsin Oddities:
Many 7FCs and 7JCs (and the J's were just-plain-odd to begin with) had the third wheel returned to it's proper place becoming 7ECs in the process. Some FCs were built as flight school trainers with a yoke in front (student position) and stick in back... Then there is the Lancer...
I can’t believe I’m admitting this, but I owned a 7FC at one time… the nose wheel made a real dog out of the plane.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a yoke in a 7FC, but I know the twin engine Champion Lancer had a stick in back, a yoke in the front, and throttles on the overhead.
 
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blane.c

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
5,174
Location
capital district NY
Wisconsin Oddities:
Many 7FCs and 7JCs (and the J's were just-plain-odd to begin with) had the third wheel returned to it's proper place becoming 7ECs in the process. Some FCs were built as flight school trainers with a yoke in front (student position) and stick in back... Then there is the Lancer...
There is a sick element to almost anything.
 
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