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Adventures in Cub building

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Little Scrapper

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I decided to avoid a "project thread" type of situation on here but still wanted to participate in either helping others or getting help myself. I thought about this quite a bit and figured I'd do this a little different.

This thread is for my J3 Cub replica but I'm only gonna post the challenges I face and how I worked out overcoming those challenges. So no updates, no glamour shot, nothing of the sort. The only posts here will be "here is my challenge" and "here is my attempt at solving them".

Hopefully people will chime in to assist and hopefully some will just read it and feel inspired to start.

Challenge #1

We built a rib jig from an old board, sanded it smooth and flat, waxed it with carnuba car wax and used scrap materials I had on hand to make the parts. The template is a sheet of scrap .050" aluminum. I guess you could say the Cub replica started on Christmas Eve 2018.

I'm at a stopping point on my jig, challenge #1, making nose ribs.

I sold the router table to make room for other equipment. All I have is a portable router. I made a aluminum airfoil template thinking it will help me make parts as a router template.

So that's my first challenge in the project, I need to figure out how to fashion together a quick router table that I can toss out when done. Here are some photos of where I stopped, the potential router template and the drawing showing what I need. If I can figure out how to make a cheap and quick router table I can finish up my jig and make parts and move on to the next challenge.

IMG_20181223_192240681.jpg

IMG_20181223_192220849.jpg

IMG_20181224_174037088.jpg

IMG_20181224_174144556.jpg

IMG_20181224_174152763.jpg

Merry Christmas.
 

don january

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Scrapper I ran into a similar challenge and ended up buying a used hospital over bed table that would not rotate and had a flat top and would raise up and down. I took a 1-1/2" hole saw and made a hole in the center and mounted my router under with cutting tool up through the table. Was rather crude but worked. Also with 42 nose pieces to be made total why couldn't you make them 2 piece and cover one side or both with a complete gusset ? I see on the print the nose rib is spaced out in front of the spar and is tied into the spar by rib caps and gussets only. I don't see why the radius of the nose rib on the inside couldn't be straight lines even as a single ply block and the outer leading edge would be easy enough to tune in with a disc sander. I would try and stack cut as many as my bandsaw would allow. By the way the hospital table second as a vise holder near the welder.
 

FritzW

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I'm at a stopping point on my jig...
I need to figure out how to fashion together a quick router table that I can toss out when done.
Merry Christmas.
I needed a "walk around" router table for the long taper on a couple of CX-4 spar cap sets, I took the ratty cover and foam off an old bar stool and mounter my router to the bottom of the seat. ...worked great. (looking for photos)

...I made sure to lower the bit when I wanted to use it as a stool :gig:
 

blane.c

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I removed the right side wing to my table saw and replaced it with a home-made one that you could drop a router in. Back side of saw fence works as router fence. Been there for maybe twenty years now takes up no more room than the table saw already did.
 

Rockiedog2

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Scrapper what about the Cassutt?
You got us all tore up about that and now we on a Cub?
 

Little Scrapper

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Scrapper what about the Cassutt?
You got us all tore up about that and now we on a Cub?
You must not have read a few threads about it? Hopefully you can survive this tragedy of what I've done. :nervous:

My life has changed, that really sums it up. The Cassutt parts, except the fuselage has been sold to a Cassutt racer.

That's it in a nut shell. Merry Christmas by the way.
 

Hot Wings

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I misread the title as "Club" building and thought 'Well Duh, borrow one".......My bad.

How about an old grungy plastic cooler? Pull the top off, turn it upside down, then hog our what is needed to clear the router? Then bolt on a flat plate of whatever you find laying around the shop with countersunk screws. Other than the screws it's all garbage to start with so no loss when it meets it's final resting place.
 

dcstrng

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Well you at least motivated me to drag out my Sport Trainer plans over the Holiday – always liked the venerable Cub and offspring (who doesn’t, at some level) once it was covered, but the antediluvian structure itself has not inspired me much, with lots of seemingly extra substructures… Still, the pure amount of information, assemblies and mods available for that airframe make it tremendously attractive – flaps (?), there must be a gazillion variants that have been tried successfully… Been thinking the similar thoughts as the grandkids get old enough to wonder when I’ll take `em flying and how that might happen in a single-seater… priorities change and I’d guess the project in the shop isn’t the highest priority, but merely reflects what the priority actually is.

Lotsaluck…
 

Victor Bravo

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and mods available for that airframe make it tremendously attractive
I'm not sure if the OP envisioned comments like this for this thread, Scraps forgive me if this is what you wanted to avoid, but it seems appropriate for me to provide a bit of "problem solving" advice per your renewed interest in the Cub. "Problem avoidance" may be more accurate. Before you build a J-3 replica with the idea of taking anyone flying in it, you'd better go out to the local grass strip and sit in the front seat of a J-3 or Cub Clone. The back seat is not much of a problem. Getting in an out of the front seat of a Cub, and spending any significant amount of time there, is not exactly graceful or comfortable if you are average or larger size.

Kids and small-frame or shorter people... no problem. Well-fed and spoiled post-Depression Americans, tall and lanky folk, people wearing big heavy winter clothing... becomes a challenge.

There are many thousands of Cubs flying, and the guys in Alaska with their Super Cubs do truly amazing things. And somehow they get into the front seat of the Super Cub (front seat solo) up there with heavy winter clothing on. But the stock J-3 Cub I had was a miserable experience getting in and out of the front seat. I was indeed a well-fed spoiled post-Depression american, but I was not "huge" and I'm only 5' 8".

So the point of this rant is that whatever they do in Alaska to make it easier to get in and out of the front (sliding front seat, or larger door opening, or re-shaped door opening - I don't know) I strongly advise doing it on any Cub replica being built today.
 

Mcmark

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Mike, are you going with a small Continental? If so, I’ve got a mount I’m taking off of my Cubby that we can do a deal on. Same as you did with Don on the tailwheel. Don’t use it, send it back.
If I can find some colt or tripacer horizontals and elevators for cheap, the ones off the cubby will be available as well.
Mark
 

Little Scrapper

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I'm not sure if the OP envisioned comments like this for this thread, Scraps forgive me if this is what you wanted to avoid, but it seems appropriate for me to provide a bit of "problem solving" advice per your renewed interest in the Cub. "Problem avoidance" may be more accurate. Before you build a J-3 replica with the idea of taking anyone flying in it, you'd better go out to the local grass strip and sit in the front seat of a J-3 or Cub Clone. The back seat is not much of a problem. Getting in an out of the front seat of a Cub, and spending any significant amount of time there, is not exactly graceful or comfortable if you are average or larger size.

Kids and small-frame or shorter people... no problem. Well-fed and spoiled post-Depression Americans, tall and lanky folk, people wearing big heavy winter clothing... becomes a challenge.

There are many thousands of Cubs flying, and the guys in Alaska with their Super Cubs do truly amazing things. And somehow they get into the front seat of the Super Cub (front seat solo) up there with heavy winter clothing on. But the stock J-3 Cub I had was a miserable experience getting in and out of the front seat. I was indeed a well-fed spoiled post-Depression american, but I was not "huge" and I'm only 5' 8".

So the point of this rant is that whatever they do in Alaska to make it easier to get in and out of the front (sliding front seat, or larger door opening, or re-shaped door opening - I don't know) I strongly advise doing it on any Cub replica being built today.
I learned to fly in a Cub, it is the airplane in which I'm most familiar with. It's cramped, no doubt. I'm currently in search of buying a already flying airplane. This Cub is simply used to satisfy my urge to build and keep my kids involved. It was either this or a Hatz. My wife and three kids helped with the decision, we all voted for a Cub replica.

My number 1 goal is to just have fun.
 

blane.c

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Shoehorning me into a cub is an artform, but with enough Crisco it can happen. Seriously my only complaint on the cub was the heal brakes, I never liked them on the cub or the Aeronca. Other than nostalgia they serve no useful purpose.
 

Victor Bravo

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Shoehorning me into a cub is an artform, but with enough Crisco it can happen. Seriously my only complaint on the cub was the heal brakes, I never liked them on the cub or the Aeronca. Other than nostalgia they serve no useful purpose.
Toe brakes would take up too much room in the Cub, they would be digging into the passenger's thighs and possibly be difficult to use. The heel brake cylinders were more compact, and eliminated the cost/weight/fabrication of toe brake linkages. On some airplanes (T-craft) toe brakes would often get your feet fouled up in the primary control system.

They're not bad once you get used to them. Until you have flown with the tiny cable operated heel brakes of the Taylorcraft, you have no idea just how pampered and spoiled you were with hydraulic Cub heel brakes :)
 

blane.c

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It would be silly to try and replace the rear brakes with toe they would be in the way of everything, but they are kinda' emergency brakes so … acceptable. The front would be better toe except for like you are saying proper room for them, I guess its one of those change one thing change everything fantasy's. I wonder how the Bearhawk LSA is configured brake wise?
 

Pops

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Toe (front), none (rear)... several more inches to play with width-wise; but then of course it wouldn't be a Cub...
The Bearhawk LSA has a nice roomy cockpit. The front seat slides back on rails making it easy to get in and out of the front or rear seat. I have sat in the prototype Bearhawk LSA, but not flown it. Have flown Bobs 4 seat Bearhawk. The LSA's cockpit is roomy for my 6' X 230 lbs and with a stall speed about like a J-3 Cub at 30 mph or so.
Bob was at my runway one time with the LSA and we were going to have a shoot-out as who could fly the slowest, Bob's Bearhawk LSA against my SSSC. I had just worked on fixing an oil leak at the oil pump and after take-off, I stayed in the pattern and landed, so it didn't happen. After watching the LSA in slow flight, believe he would have won. My indicated stall speed is about 30 mph but believe the Bearhawk's stall speed is a little slower. The difference between the stall speed and cruise speed with where the Bearhawk LSA really shines, compared to most airplanes including my SSSC, Piper J-3 Cub or any other airplane that I can think of.
As much as I like Cubs and started my training in a Super Cub, I believe I would like the Bearhawk LSA better than a J-3.

Have a good friend in Wy that is getting his Bearhawk LSA inspected and will be starting the test flying very shortly. He also built the 4 seat Bearhawk and now its in AK . Picture.
 

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blane.c

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The high wing aileron stall that has killed so many (the classic watching a moose while turning and stalling in) is supposed to be greatly reduced or eliminated with the Bearhawk wing. A friend of mine put the Bearhawk wing on his Super Cub and loves it. Building a scratch built J-3 it would be little effort to use the improved wing.

But Pops You never addressed the toe brake thing about the Bearhawk?
 
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