Acceptable Fiberglass Suppliers for Aircraft Construction

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

TLAR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2020
Messages
218
I don’t want the point about a negative pressure chamber to be lost. The chamber will not mask a leak. Having a leak free clamp insures a uniform 14.7 across the entire part.
 

Vigilant1

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
5,861
Location
US
I don’t want the point about a negative pressure chamber to be lost. The chamber will not mask a leak. Having a leak free clamp insures a uniform 14.7 across the entire part.
Yes, good point. For many layups, about 20” Hg (9.8 psi) of vacuum is sufficient to get a low resin fraction and to get trapped air out of the layup, and reducing pressure more could risk unwanted compression of core materials.
But, as you say, the important thing is to address the leaks. To the degree that new air is getting into the bag, continuing to remove air from somewhere else may just draw air into the layup during the cure.
Thanks.
 

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
472
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
_IF_ the ply orientations of the tri-axial and/or quad axial stitched cloth meets your requirements, and _IF_ you're vacuum bagging everything, then these materials can be extremely useful. But if you're NOT vacuum bagging (and I don't recall your particular project plan) then these cloths will be EXTREMELY heavy, as they have a LOT of interstitial space in them due to the non-woven quality of the multiple plies. They will retain a LOT of epoxy, without bagging.

If you are bagging, then you're good to go (as long as you bag correctly, which many people don't - they think that holding a vacuum, even if it's leaky, is all that's needed. If you have a leak in the bag, then you're merely ensuring that you will draw air through your layup as it cures).


Mark,

Excellent points you have made for sure. At this point, I cannot say exactly which of their systems I will be using until their engineers finish looking over the information I sent them. I sent them the specifications on the wings and the wing build manual in order for them to understand exactly what is I am doing so they can provide the very best advice and product to suit my needs.

They even mentioned me using carbon fiber but would know more after their review.
I must admit that I have been concerned about the weight like all of us builders are. I am relieved to know they will help me determine the best material and method to use.

As soon as I hear back from them I will post their recommendation on this thread.

Thanks for the advice!

Yellowhammer
 

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
472
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
A presenter at an EAA composite workshop today kept mentioning Rock West (www.rockwestcomposites.com)

No affiliation, but I’m also looking to buy some mold making materials, strand mat fiberglass, carbon fiber fabric and epoxy for resin infusion.

Thanks for the great info and links in this thread. The timing is perfect

Side question: do you use different epoxy for engine cowlings due to thermal stresses?

Kenneth


I use the Aero-Poxy's Structural epoxy for those areas..

Thanks,
Yellowhammer
 

TLAR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2020
Messages
218
So..........
You think you are smarter than a Truck Driver? That may be. Food for thought.
 

cblink.007

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2014
Messages
631
Location
Maryland, USA
I’m also looking to buy some mold making materials, strand mat fiberglass, carbon fiber fabric and epoxy for resin infusion.
FibreGlast Developments is your one stop shop for mold materials, from resins, glass, gelcoats, tools, name it. Literally the Aircraft Spruce/Pep Boys of mold stuff. If they don't got it, you don't want it!

If you are a military vet, they offer discounts as well!
 
Top