Abbott Baynes Flea

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Joined
Jun 30, 2022
Messages
5
Location
UK
Hi, I'm looking for some information on the Abbott Baynes Flea.

Please see image attached, and the circled part that I don't know.

Untitled-1.png
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2022
Messages
5
Location
UK
Thanks, I have the Ellis & Jones book and also "How to build and Fly the Flying Flea" book but nothing mentions this item and its not on standard Fleas.

I have a really bad full page image of the article and this is what I can make out from the text.

" The cantilever wing is pivoted on *something* at two points and may be detached by withdrawing two pins. On the right in the sketch of the *mass* ? balance on one of the arms which operate the wing control rods"

This is my project for Microsoft Flight Simulator. I'm doing eight different variants in total.
22.PNG
 

rotax618

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Oct 31, 2005
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1,670
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Evans Head Australia
I would say it is a weight to balance the stick load during taxying, when taxying the weight of the wing is considerable and on the early HM14 it could bounce down on the pilot’s head.
 

Tiger Tim

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Apr 26, 2013
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Thunder Bay
I would say it is a weight to balance the stick load during taxying, when taxying the weight of the wing is considerable and on the early HM14 it could bounce down on the pilot’s head.
What’s weirder is the early HM 14 would need the balance weight in the wing itself since it just had a single ‘more incidence’ cable down each side and no way for the pilot to push the trailing edge up without, you know, reaching out and just pushing it up.
 

Rob de Bie

Active Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2021
Messages
42
'Flying Flea - Henri Mignet's Pou-du-Ciel' by Arthur Ord-Hume has some information on pages 45-47:

"However, a major problem was now found to be the relatively high stick forces required to move the wing. This was overcome by providing lead counterweights fix to cranked arms attached to the wing actuating lever on each side of the fuselage. These were felt to be an interim solution but the movement of the wing centre-of-pressure acriss the flight envelope suggested little was to be gained from simply altering the pivot point of the wing."


It sounds like the writer knew a thing or two about the design process by Appleby, who made many changes to the PdC design.

Rob
 
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