A very affordable EFIS (Talos)

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Rhino

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
876
Location
KTHA
All of that equally, but at a much greater cost, applies to Garmin. Sigh.
That's one of the primary reasons I decided on Dynon. Love Garmin stuff, but you never stop paying a lot. There's still some cost with Dynon chart updates, but overall it's much less, especially if you're VFR only like me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BJC

Vigilant1

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
5,991
Location
US
In the aviation environment, daylight screen legibility is very important, esp if the cockpit has a bubble canopy. This is iprimarily about brightness, but contrast and screen reflectivity also play a role.
In the old days (a few years ago...), the Nexus 7 Gen 2 was a budget favorite among the Vans folks. I'm not sure what the current favorites are.
 

Rhino

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
876
Location
KTHA
Good point. I need to take the wife's tablet flying a couple of times.
 

103

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 2, 2015
Messages
374
Location
Wauwatosa WI
They are indeed frictionless in some ways, as I noted before. That's what tight control gives you. The old school comment brings up an interesting point. Long ago it was obvious that people liked most what they 'grew up' with. If you started computing with a Mac, you always liked them. The same for PCs. That hasn't really changed. Mobile devices experience that same brand comfort from familiarity, except for Windows mobile devices. Don't even get me started on those.

The hierarchal file system may seem archaic to some, but it's still necessary to get things done, especially in IT. I haven't been out of IT very long, so I'm not exactly speaking of ancient history here (I was mostly server, network and app administration). And I'm not talking IT level stuff here anyway. There's nothing old fashioned about wanting to see the files I've downloaded. That's just one example of the basic functionality you'd expect from any system, but I don't get on my iPad Pro. There are lots more, like being able to add a new word to the dictionary, having the cursor actually go where I'm pointing instead of somewhere else, or sharing files between devices. Really, really basic stuff. We could go for hours, but the points would be the same.

As you and I have both noted, the tight control in iOS does have distinct advantages, and those advantages have different appeal to different people. Nothing new there. I just prefer to have more control over the systems I buy. I know I may have to sacrifice some of that control and use other devices in order to use some of the aviation apps I prefer. And thanks to you, I have a better insight now as to why that really is (thanks again). But I'd still like to be able to use the attributes even those tightly controlled systems claim to have, and I'm still going to be frustrated when I can't, or when I have to jump through major hoops to do so. It's what I 'grew up' with. Maybe if I hadn't grown up being able to do those things, I wouldn't know what I was missing. Maybe it wouldn't bother me much, or maybe I wouldn't care at all. I don't know. But it seems to me having tight control shouldn't require you to make basic tasks difficult or impossible to perform. They shouldn't be mutually exclusive. People have been complaining about a lot of this stuff for a loooooong time. I see it when I do a search to find out why I can't do yet something else on my iPad. There's tons of motivation to develop apps in iOS, as you noted, but there doesn't seem to be any inclination to make the operating system do basic tasks easily.

You have good reasons for preferring iOS, and lots of other folks do too. What bugs me may be just what seems like normal ops to someone who grew up with iOS. But I'm not that person. The cons of iOS outweigh the pros on my personal balance sheet, so I have my own good reasons to prefer something else. Not everyone is going to like the same things. Both systems work well, but in different ways and for different reasons. It's just boils down to a matter of personal preference.


Yeah, that.

My wife wanted a tablet after watching me use my iPad for a couple of years, but she's sort of my opposite when it comes to technology. She's been using Windows PCs for many years, but I regularly have to remind her how to do find things or perform somewhat minor tasks. As such, I knew getting her a tablet with a new OS would be a nightmare scenario, so I got her a Samsung for Christmas that works pretty much the same as her phone (which I also still have to help her with sometimes). She likes it, and having watched her use it for a while, I'm thinking of putting Avare on it to see how that goes. Maybe I won't need an iOS device to run aviation apps with after all. That would make life SOOOO much easier for me, and it would simplify my panel configuration as well (fingers crossed).
You will like AVARE!
 

rv7charlie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
Messages
1,427
Location
Jackson
I've got both the original and 2013 N7s. Even the older one is bright enough and high enough rez in an RV4 cockpit. I'd still be using the older one if Google hadn't bloated the OS beyond usability. I may eventually root it to see if I can get it usable again. Last time I tried it, it still ran Avare just fine, but it was taking a cross-country flight to boot up.
 
Top